LumberJocks

Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'restoration'

  • Advertise with us
View skeezaroonie's profile

Fitting a beautiful old birdseye pine chest with a cedar lining

08-28-2011 11:26 PM by skeezaroonie | 2 comments »

We recently ran into a remarkable old chest at an estate sale. I fell in love with it immediately for the birdseye figure of the panels. At the time I thought it was a nice older veneered piece only to find out once we brought it home that it was not veneer but solid birdseye pine planks. I’ve only seen birdseye pine once before, in a restored lobby of an old east Texas hotel. The entire lobby & stairwell were built from highly figured longleaf pine. The story is that the carpe...

Read this entry »


View Brit's profile

The Humble Hand Brace - A Beginner's Guide to Restoring, Buying and Using #3: Part 3 - Cleaning and Restoring a Brace to 'Like New' Condition

08-28-2011 12:18 AM by Brit | 19 comments »

At the end of Part 2, I left you with this photo showing how the ratchet end of the brace looked after de-rusting it and polishing it up. I still had the other end to do. So I went ahead and de-rusted the ‘Head’ end of the brace using the same process I covered in Parts 1 and 2. You don’t need to see that again. After the rust came off, I found confirmation that this was indeed a Skinner brace made in Sheffield, England. I was pretty sure it was, because I’ve got a 6” Skinner brace tha...

Read this entry »


View Brit's profile

The Humble Hand Brace - A Beginner's Guide to Restoring, Buying and Using #2: Part 2 – Cleaning and Restoring a Brace to ‘Like New’ Condition

08-24-2011 09:31 PM by Brit | 30 comments »

At the end of Part 1 I showed you a photo of the polished chuck. The outside was complete and the rust had been removed from the inside, but I still had to smooth the inside face to prevent it marking the jaws again. To do this, I cut a piece of dowel about 4” long, and marked approximately 1 1/6” in from one end using an awl. Then I drilled a 3mm hole using a hand drill. Well who’s got time to charge batteries these days? Using my dovetail saw, I cut a slot about 1/16” wide str...

Read this entry »


View Shannan's profile

Saw: A Story of Adventure (but not like in that torture movie)

07-29-2011 03:01 AM by Shannan | 27 comments »

I’ve been lurking on Lumberjocks for a while now, but this is my first post. So … hi. I think you’re all amazing. :-) After years of dreaming, I finally live in a place where this is space for me to set up a woodshop. I’ve been building utilitarian furniture and repurposing existing pieces for the past seven years, but I only started getting serious about woodworking as an artisan craft in the past year. For my first project, I decided to restore an old rip saw that my roommate and I fo...

Read this entry »


View CharlesAuguste's profile

Disston dehorning saw restoration

07-24-2011 06:57 PM by CharlesAuguste | 9 comments »

I got this saw at a flea market for next to nothing the wood handle was broken but i did like the way it looks,and i wanted to make it into a hacksaw, since i dont have any animals that need dehorning!!!Clean everything, fixed the handle, painted the saw black, painted the lettering with antique gold.works beautifully and it sure is nice to have a few hacksaw for the different tpi configuration.

Read this entry »


View Don W's profile

Planes restored - Because I can. #8: Electrolysis

07-05-2011 03:32 AM by Don W | 7 comments »

First and formost I want to thank Al for his Electrolysis: on the cheap for vintage tool people and all the other LJ members who responded. This is a shortened version of the forum thread. Go get a rubber tote, a battery charger, some Arm and Hammer Washing Soda and a long piece of metal (like a length of rebar, or steel rod or bar) Add water and about a table spoon of Washing soda (baking soda doesn’t work nearly as well) to each gallon of water. I like to error on the “...

Read this entry »


View hodgepodge's profile

Stanley No. 7 Identification

07-01-2011 02:38 AM by hodgepodge | 9 comments »

Ok, so I found this plane at an estate sale a few months ago. I decided to finally give it a make over when I started trying to ID the type. Using the flow charts I find online I would assume it is a type 4. However, there are some strange things that don’t match like the frog screws being round head screws, and the frog seat on the sole is kind of strange. Also, the lever cap has an interesting design on near the bottom. The only marks on the sole that I can make out is No 7 in front o...

Read this entry »


View RGtools's profile

Restoring History-Auburn Tool Co Try Plane #4: Finishing touches

06-26-2011 05:19 AM by RGtools | 6 comments »

The bottom was flat enough for rough work but not fine cuts impressive after 137 years and a trip from coast to coast. Now I needed to make it flat enough for fine work. I found it fitting that my old plane was being restored by my newest plane. My vise crapped out (my fault, need to give me bench it’s yearly tune up…which may be the next next blog) so this is a good improvised set up for planing (yet another reason to make your bench clamp friendly) I use winding st...

Read this entry »


View RGtools's profile

Restoring History-Auburn Tool Co Try Plane #3: Lessons Learned

06-24-2011 04:32 AM by RGtools | 3 comments »

So I made a mistake. Not a big one but definitely avoidable. When I set my grinder up, I used a nice thick blade to figure out where may angle should be. Unfortunately I forgot to factor in the tapered blade on the old plane makes a RADICAL 10 degree difference to my grinding angle so I realized that I had a 20 bevel angle about early enough correct it. I tapped the stand forward so I ended up with a second bevel of 30 degrees. Believe it or not the secondary bevel is big enough to reference ...

Read this entry »


View RGtools's profile

Restoring History-Auburn Tool Co Try Plane #2: Cambering the Iron

06-21-2011 05:49 AM by RGtools | 12 comments »

Never try to outsmart a dead guy. If you see something that worked a hundred years ago, don’t try to improve it, that’s not your job. Your job is just not to mess things up. Moderns tend to put way more aggressive a camber on there irons than needed, Lee Valley and Lie Nielson put a 3 in radius on their scrub planes. A camber that size is great for removing wood in a hurry, and on it’s own a 3 inch camber sounds like a great idea. But our ancestors realized that each tool wa...

Read this entry »


« prev 1 ... 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 ... 33 next »
327 entries


DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com