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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'marking gauge'

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View harum's profile

Marking Gauge #3: some progress

08-01-2014 05:19 PM by harum | 0 comments »

Haven’t had much time lately for my marking gauge: our neighbor pulled out of her garage on her SUV without … opening the garage door. Fixing the door has taken more than I thought it would. Epoxied brass wear strip, the fence and put in the threaded insert. Instead of the suggested 3/8” hole for the insert I had to make it a bit wider than 7/16”—the rosewood’s really hard. Found a brass bolt to be sacrificed for two shoes. The knurled scr...

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View harum's profile

Marking Gauge #2: wear strips

07-24-2014 08:14 PM by harum | 0 comments »

Cut and sanded the strips to the right width, and cleaned the exposed sides with grit 320 sand paper. Have to find a piece of 5/16” brass rod or a couple of bolts for the shoes and come up with a way to cut a thin slit through the beam to hold cutter blades. This slit will be at the bottom of a hole at one of the ends of the beam.

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View harum's profile

Marking Gauge #1: have finally started

07-23-2014 07:59 PM by harum | 0 comments »

I had been saving a nice Honduran rosewood cut-off for a while before the last weekend. I wanted to make a marking gauge and thought rosewood was a good wood for it: dense and oily. A few gauges seen at LJ and in several ww magazines were an inspiration. The planned dimensions: fence—2-7/8” × 4-1/2” × 7/8”, beam—3/4” × 1” × 9-1/2”. Cut the beam and fence parts; got a 1/8” × 1” brass bar for wear strips from a recycled construc...

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View WoodAndShop's profile

How to Cut Rabbets with Hand Tools

05-03-2014 12:36 PM by WoodAndShop | 2 comments »

By Joshua Farnsworth (Writer at WoodAndShop.com) I’m excited to share a quick video tutorial about how to cut rabbet joints by hand, with a few simple hand tools. This method focuses on cutting rabbets along the grain, which is especially useful for cutting moldings (first step in using hollows & rounds molding planes), picture frames, etc. Go to this original blog entry (here) for some links to the tools that I used in this tutorial (you can use variations):-Marking gauge (I...

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View yuridichesky's profile

Workbench #4: Legs: mortise and tenon

09-17-2013 07:58 PM by yuridichesky | 7 comments »

First of all, my workbench build is far beyond the point that I’m going to share, I just have bunch of pics and I decided to throw them on the blog. There’s nothing special here, but some little documentary to remember. So… For M&T job I made couple of marking gauges out of pine. I know pine is not the best choice for this, I just wanted to practice a little before making marking gauge of my dream. I put pins just where I needed and then just re-inserted...

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View Dave Rutan's profile

Small Brass & Wood Marking Gauge

07-16-2013 11:26 AM by Dave Rutan | 3 comments »

This does not qualify as woodworking, so I’ve placed it here. I don’t have a lot of use for a marking gauge, so I didn’t want to splurge on a manufactured one. I decided to try making a small marking gauge that would have brass elements. I like the look of brass and I’m a cheapskate to boot. I found a plumbing fitting which I felt would work. It was a 3/4 in. x 1/2 in. male adapter MPT x barb. I cut the theads off the 3/4 end with a hack saw and then ground off the re...

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View StumpyNubs's profile

Old-Timey Woodworking #2: Almost all you ever wanted to know about making and using marking gauges!

07-08-2013 07:47 PM by StumpyNubs | 12 comments »

The second episode of our new hand tool woodworking show is all about one of the most essential tools for the old-timey woodworker: The marking gauge! In fact Stumpy applies his woodworking wit and wisdom to three types of gauges, building a marking gauge, a mortise gauge, and a cutting gauge; all three with just a few hardwood scraps and a little bench time. At the end you’ll have a deeper understanding of this critical tool, not to mention three of them to call your own! The Ol...

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View reedwood's profile

John Walcott, Where are you?

04-06-2013 02:58 PM by reedwood | 10 comments »

.I was checking out vintage tools on E Bay the other day when I came across this rosewood marking gauge.. . It was obviously handmade and had a brass name plate on it: ”Handcrafted by John Walcott, Benbrook Texas” . The tool had six days to go before the final auction so I put it on the watch list. There was something about this tool that got my attention. It didn’t have fancy brass inlays or parts made from ebony. There were no engravings or elaborate scro...

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View Rob Drown's profile

Marking Gauges #2: Marking Gauges

09-29-2012 04:29 PM by Rob Drown | 0 comments »

I am building 4 marking gauges and a small panel gauge. Two of the marking gauges and the panel gauge are for me. One gauge is to be a gift and the last gauge is to be sold and the proceeds donated to our woodworking club’s toy building program. I am going to build the French style from PWW. Bob Rozaieski’s podcast and incorporate improvements from the smokum youtube video. Thanks for providing so much good info. So far I have selected some walnut that I was given. It ha...

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View GlennsGrandson's profile

Tools #2: CS Osborne draw gauge/leather slitter (OLD)

09-04-2012 04:07 AM by GlennsGrandson | 2 comments »

I just picked one of these up at a garage sale for $2 not knowing what it was. (and got a lot of other great buys too!)It says C.S. OSBORNE & co. NEWARK, N.J. From what I’ve read it is indeed a leather cutter, aka draw gauge (http://www.csosborne.com/no51.5.htm). Mine has black japaning on the handle and the blade says C.S. OSBORNE & CO HARRISON N.J. The blade must have been a replacement. On the opposite side of the measurements is it stamped MADE IN U.S.A., it’s stamp...

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