LumberJocks

Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'jointer'

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View MrMeasureTwice's profile

Building the shop #3: quick update, ramblings...

12-06-2011 07:29 AM by MrMeasureTwice | 0 comments »

Hi folks,Been trying to make progress in the shop every weekend. I have no evenings available during the week due to my work schedule and long commute. So, weekends are made for woodworking, or in my case, for getting ready to do woodworking. So far, progress has been good and steady until last weekend. Saturday was one of those days where I needed to really be a husband and give some focus to my wife and so I did. We had a nice time on Saturday and I even persuaded my beautiful wife to ac...

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View ~Julie~'s profile

Making a Condiment Tote (for beginners) #4: Making the handle and finishing the tote

12-06-2011 02:30 AM by ~Julie~ | 9 comments »

Now that we have the size of the handle piece, the actual handle has to be cut out of it.For now I keep the piece as a rectangle, and will do the angled sides after the handle is cut out. I’m using my router and a template guide to remove the area for the handle. First I need to make a template out of hardboard that is 11/32” larger than the actual size of the oval hole that I want. I determined a hole 3 1/2” long and 1 1/8” wide for the handle would be good for t...

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View ~Julie~'s profile

Making a Condiment Tote (for beginners) #3: Finishing the inside

12-01-2011 05:31 AM by ~Julie~ | 2 comments »

Now that the sides, ends and bottom are cut I stain them, on the insides only, before putting the box of the tote together. It’s much easier to stain before glueing because trying to reach your hand inside a box and stain it is very difficult. With pine, I use flecto Varathane’s Gel Stain. It does not require any undercoating and always give me a streak-proof finish. Not all stains work well on pine but I have had great success with this. I rub it on with a piece of old t-s...

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View ~Julie~'s profile

Making a Condiment Tote (for beginners) #2: Cutting the side and end pieces

11-28-2011 12:36 AM by ~Julie~ | 4 comments »

In the previous post (part 1) I showed how to prepare the wood for the four totes I am making. After the wood was resawn and cut apart with the handsaw it will have a slight ridge down the middle (and often a few scratches from the saw). You can remove the ridges, if you like, with a hand plane, but it’s not necessary. The wood is put through the planer until it reaches the desired thickness, which in my case, is 1/2” 6 pieces are needed for each tote, two sides,...

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View MrMeasureTwice's profile

Building the shop #2: The beginning...

11-27-2011 12:39 AM by MrMeasureTwice | 4 comments »

Good day fellow dusty chippers,Short entry here – thought you’d like to see what I started with in the garage – the big mess… The picture is midstream in moving stuff around to find stuff to throw away and give away. Since the beginning of the big purge, I’ve made 6 trips to Salvation Army (so far), put countless objects on the end of the driveway with FREE signs on them and furnished 1/2 of house for the new family across the street. OK, may 1/3… seriously...

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View JordsWoodShop's profile

Jord's Ramblings #2: Christmas Has Come Early

11-26-2011 06:11 PM by JordsWoodShop | 0 comments »

Click here to view the full article with images After looking for a better quality thicknesser in classified newspapers and online trading sites for quite some time, I finally found something that seemed to good to be true, advertised as a 16″ panel saw, 6″ jointer, 15″ planer/thicknesser, and a 1200CFM industrial dust extractor, it caught my eye, and for the low price of $400 for the lot how could it not? At first I thought it would have been a typo in the advert, I thought it should h...

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View ~Julie~'s profile

Making a Condiment Tote (for beginners) #1: Preparing the Wood

11-25-2011 08:11 PM by ~Julie~ | 5 comments »

This series of posts will show how I made four condiment totes for a local restaurant. I’m going to show most steps from rough wood to finished product. Most of you will find this basic, but hopefully I can help some beginners see how things are put together. The restaurant wanted holders for ketchup, mustard, relish and vinegar that the waitresses or waiters could take to the table with them. (In Canada, some of us like white vinegar on our fries. On my trips to the U. S., I hav...

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View Knot_Board_At_Awl's profile

Beginnings #2: Procuring Equipment

11-25-2011 09:16 AM by Knot_Board_At_Awl | 1 comment »

As written in my first post, I’m still at the beginning of my foray into woodworking as most of my wood projects so far are home renovations and grunt work! Throughout my home renovations, I have been keeping my eye open for equipment so that I can slowly build it up and have it ready for when I can really get into woodworking within the next two years or so (at least that is the plan). Most of my equipment is used (See my workshop for details). I figure that buying something used he...

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View tenontim's profile

Face Jointing Wide Boards on a 6" Jointer

11-23-2011 04:02 PM by tenontim | 13 comments »

After commenting and following a post by MichaelJ, I decided that a picture or two is worth a thousand words. So, here’s how I do it. (I had also posted in the past another way, but I like this method better)First, remove the blade guard on your planer. Set the fence to the maximum width.Face joint the board as you normally would, until the jointable surface is flat.You should now have the flat, jointed surface and the “rabbet” from the overhang.This is the spacer board, whi...

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View Byron's profile

Work In Progress #2: Canasta Part Two

11-20-2011 06:11 AM by Byron | 0 comments »

So unfortunately I had not taken many pictures during the process of hand planing the curved door as well as cutting the dovetails for the carcass. I wanted the door to be thin, very thin, which ultimately led to many, many problems. I ended up with a final thickness of a bout 1/4 inch. While I was milling the door I did not have the wood move on me much at all, the Avodire I ended up getting was so incredibly stable I could do almost anything to it and it would not warp. The one thing ...

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