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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'joining'

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View bandit571's profile

Vermont Lap Desk, almost done:

04-20-2013 05:43 PM by bandit571 | 2 comments »

With the sides all nice and coplanar, time to mill a rabbet for a bottom. Set up a router with a 3/8” rabbetting bit, and ran it around the edges. Squared the corners with a chisel. Now, I get told there is to be a divider in this desk. Hunt around for a piece of scrap wood to make the divider. I also needed a dado for it to be installed. So, I laid one out, about three inches from the front. handsawn, and then chiseled to remove the waste And repeat for the other s...

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View David's profile

Hide Glue #1: Make Your Own (Non-Metallic) Hide Glue Brush!

01-27-2009 08:28 AM by David | 6 comments »

I have been gearing up for a particular project. In preparation I have been doing a bit of research on using hide glue. For the purist, it is best to use a glue brush without a metal ferrule. The reasoning behind this is the metal ferrule can potentially cause a black stain. There are brushes available for hide glue but there are rather expensive. For the time being, I am spending shop funds on materials and tools. The focus of this blog is to show an inexpensive alternative to an expensiv...

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View Damien Pollet's profile

Bootstrapping a living-room workbench #2: Overthinking the design

04-28-2011 01:28 AM by Damien Pollet | 15 comments »

I’ve been playing in SketchUp, trying to design the ultimate-workbench-from-a-kitchen-coutertop.This is more or less an arbitrary challenge, because I could probably glue a second countertop over the first one (after buying more than two clamps) and make a decent Roubo bench for a third of the price of the Festool drill… hmm. This is one of the first designs, strongly inspired by Kenneth Woodruff's knock down bench. For reference, all stock is 38mm (1.5in) thick. The rectangle...

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View revieck's profile

Mac's toy box

01-21-2012 11:01 PM by revieck | 1 comment »

http://youtu.be/5GHFPZNDPzo Building a toy box of a three tiered design. Stained then finished with water based poly.

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View Thomas Keefe's profile

Allyson's Nightstand #2: Dry Fit

06-13-2009 08:50 AM by Thomas Keefe | 4 comments »

Many of the nightstand components are complete now and I am getting ready to start gluing. I plan to glue up several intermediate components and then glue the components together. The first component includes the two front legs and the upper and lower drawer rails. These pieces are all sanded now and I plan to glue them up shortly. The next piece will include the two back legs and the back apron. Finally, I will connect the front and back with the side aprons, center drawer rails and the bott...

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View jjw5858's profile

Exercises in Artisanship #23: Rustic Renaissance Trestle Table: Part 6 THE FINAL

08-14-2012 07:28 PM by jjw5858 | 4 comments »

This table is special I suppose because it is my first. My shop being set in all natural conditions sure made this a spread out project, there were some truly brutal hot and humid days that let this sit and wait for a better time to work with it. I wanted a piece that had touches of rustic warmth supported with lines of a Renaissance rhythm. To stand back and see the entire composition in it’s thought out form, from some ragged sketches to this on my living room floor is a nice reward for ...

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View bondogaposis's profile

Roubo #6: Assembly

03-07-2013 02:10 AM by bondogaposis | 9 comments »

I was able to get the assembly done today. It was big day. I can see the tunnel at the end of the light! I have been working on the leg vise chop and all of the mortises and holes that have to be cut into the leg as well. This was much easier to do prior to assembling the bench. Here is the finished chop and parallel glide.On to the rest of the bench. I cut the pins for drawboring first and set them on the heater. I was thinking that this would make them a bit more pliable. Buy the ti...

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View harum's profile

Walnut kitchen countertop #5: glue-ups trimmed

02-05-2014 04:02 AM by harum | 0 comments »

The glue-ups were trimmed a bit to fit the space above the base cabinets. The walls around the cabs don’t meet at right angles though, so the right glue-up had to be cut accordingly. What is left before finishing is sanding with an ROS, grits 100 through 400. I also want to treat the edge with either a 1/8” round over, or a 1/8” bevel bits. Have to try on a scrap piece first to see which works better. Have yet to find one joint connector to bridge the left and r...

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View dannorocks's profile

Cabinetmaker's Toolchest #2: Dovetailing the case and bottom skirt

11-15-2015 04:40 PM by dannorocks | 3 comments »

With the jointed boards smoothed of tool marks and lumber yard stamps I’m ready to dovetail. I chose 1:6 ratio since I’m using pine, and will cut the tails first. I chose to lay out a tail 1” from the edge of long boards then used my dividers to space out my tails so that the opposite edge has a tail 1” from the edge of the board. Once I was happy with that I decided to go with 1” wide tails and drew out the boards and began cutting them out with my only back...

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View kenthemadcarpenter's profile

choosing what is right for you #4: How many router bits do You really need- for newbies

12-12-2015 12:33 PM by kenthemadcarpenter | 6 comments »

This is probably one of the most asked questions for those just getting into wood working. Obviously there is no real right answer. My self getting and choosing router bits is a simple enough decision to make. While in some some sense buying a 150 – 172 would over all have cost benefits in overall savings, other ways it would be a huge waste of money because my chances of using all of them would be slim. The best way at least for me when choosing a bit is I ask myself the following ques...

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