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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'inlay'

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View Jon3's profile

Inlay Tools #2: Radius Cutter complete

07-08-2009 03:52 PM by Jon3 | 7 comments »

Cut off and mounted, the brass point actually looks kind of nice. I’ll just be a little less generous with the epoxy next time, so I don’t end up with that overfill bead. I mounted the radius cutter, going about 1/16th to 1/8th deeper than the brass pivot point, so that the cutter will remain as perpendicular to the work as possible. Since the holes in the cutter to attach it to the tool are oval, there is some room for adjustment later on. It isn’t perfect, ...

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View Karson's profile

Baltimore WoodShow - Vendor with a new item -- Inlays

01-10-2010 01:23 AM by Karson | 20 comments »

I just got back from the Baltimore (Timonium) Wood Show, and as I was walking down the last aisle after visiting with LJ member Chuck Bender. I noticed this gentleman sitting on a stool doing some strange things with wood. His name is Geoffrey Noden. Geoffrey in the man that has his name on the Noden AdjustABench It was in his booth that his wife was looking after the Adjust a bench and he was sitting at a stool in front of this tool. What this tool does is cut patterns in wood are then...

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View Jon3's profile

Compass Rose Inlay #2: Inlay the Compass Rose

12-15-2009 09:25 PM by Jon3 | 13 comments »

I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to take this part slowly. There are no shortcuts that leave you with a great inlay! Most commercial veneer is thin, 1/42nd or so. So you don’t have a lot of room to work with, once you’ve inlaid the compass rose. That means you need to make sure your inlay surface is ready to go. I used this maple panel with a little bit of curl to it. This has been pre-sanded to 320. You start by solidly taping down the inlay in i...

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Inlay Tools #5: Thicknessing Gauge

07-13-2009 04:30 PM by Jon3 | 3 comments »

Once again, I went for some more of that curly spalted maple offcut. I spent some time seeing if I could figure out how to make my own tooling from a spare card scraper, my my first attemps to cut down hardened stock were a pretty big failure. I picked up the L-N cutters, since they’re only $15 and appropriately sized already, and went to town. This is by far the simplest tool in the batch. Really, its just a block of wood with 2 cuts, 2 rabbets, and 4 screws. I didn’t thin...

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View Jon3's profile

Inlay Tools #4: Slicing Gauge

07-13-2009 04:22 PM by Jon3 | 2 comments »

With my straight line cutter complete, I moved on to the slicing gauge. This tool, along with a slicing board (which is really just a board with a lip to hold the inlay material up against) allows you to cut (a ripping action) long thin strips from your inlay sheet stock. This is the first part of making the inlay material itself. Here is my ‘raw materials’ shot. I went with a curly spalted maple body, and a Sipo cutter support bar left over from the previous tool’s offcuts....

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View JoeyG's profile

Epoxy Inlay #1: carving and first layer of epoxy

11-25-2011 03:39 AM by JoeyG | 14 comments »

I start with the lid already sized for the box. This one is purpleheart. I know, it’s almost impossible to carve, but it’s what the customer ordered. So I find a way. Next is to design your inlay After the drawing is done, I cover it with scotch tape or box tape Then comes the mirror and xacto knife After my stencil is made I transfer it to my lid blank With my trusty chip carving knife, I carve in my design. Since purpleheart is so hard I chose to o...

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View John Fry's profile

A Hepplewhite style Federal game table in six days, PIX.

09-18-2008 02:49 AM by John Fry | 13 comments »

A while back I posted a project that I did in my shop in California with my woodworking friend Jack Hutchison from Houston, TX. Here is that post: A Krenov Inspired Cabinet on Stand in Six Days We completed that cabinet during a six day visit by Jack. Our agreement was that at some future date, I would go to Houston and we’d do another six day project in his shop. So….I arrived at Jack’s and we completed a much more complicated piece in another six day time frame and here it is………....

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View NightOwl's profile

Turquoise Inlay for Wood Turning #1: Turquoise Inlay for Wood Turning

06-29-2010 03:55 AM by NightOwl | 5 comments »

My wife and I have been working with Turquoise a good bit in our wood turned works. The project titled “Blue Starburst Bowl” received some great feedback along with a couple requests for a blog on our process of inlaying with natural stone. Unfortunately we have never set out to formally document our process so we don’t have any photos of intermediate steps. Therefore, I’ll do my best to describe the steps in detail. Starting outFirst you need something to inla...

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View Brian Havens's profile

The Straightedge (video) #2: Router Inlay Basics

12-23-2009 10:07 PM by Brian Havens | 13 comments »

Here it is. My next video… finally! I feel like I got over a lot of learning curves on this one. I found this a particularly challenging subject to present because router inlay can get involved and there are often several ways to go about the different steps. Trying to cram all that into a video, however, is more likely to discourage folks from trying router inlay. My goal in this video was to present the essential knowledge and skills that one can start building on, thereby remo...

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View davemoorefurniture's profile

Check out my latest vid

03-30-2010 09:40 PM by davemoorefurniture | 13 comments »

I am new to lumberjocks and was recommended by a current user. Check out this video I made that shows how to use hand tools to inlay a design in stringing. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BUSfz3n7nYE

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