LumberJocks

Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'hand tools'

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View brianl's profile

Hand tool workbench #2: Starting with the legs

10-24-2010 09:30 PM by brianl | 4 comments »

I changed the overall dimensions of the bench to accommodate a top that is two feet by four feet. My shop is pretty small so I’m trying to make everything more compact. My first task with the new bench was to create the end assemblies. So, I used a German cross cut handsaw (http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com/24-Hand-Saw-7-TPI-Cross-Cut-Teeth-Germany/productinfo/520-0600/) I ordered from traditional woodworker and got to work. Once I rough-cut the lumber down, I used my new Stanl...

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View Paul Sellers's profile

Making a workbench, without a workbench #2: Laminating the top (with video)

06-12-2012 02:58 PM by Paul Sellers | 12 comments »

Making the Workbench with Paul Sellers If the video below is not working please use this link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ru2ZiNsWek This replicates my personal workbench, one I have used and preferred over all others for, well, actually, half a century. Let’s talk briefly about benches and specifically working workbenches and not images of what a bench should be. Anyone can build any bench type they like, regardless of whether it works well or not, is big and clunky and la...

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View RGtools's profile

Occasional Table Class (Hand Tool Build) #21: Laying Out the Joinery For Your Table

01-03-2012 03:44 AM by RGtools | 7 comments »

Once your stock is at a working dimension (4 square and final length for the rails an inch overlong for the legs) it’s time to start laying out the joints that will create the base for your table. The joinery used for a good table is a haunched mortise & tenon. There are several great alternatives…but this is a good starting point. For furniture it is important to think of the end result early on. Take a moment to arrange the pieces on your bench so you know at a glance whe...

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View Texasgaloot's profile

Mirrors from my Website blog #7: Politics, Religion, and Woodworking

01-26-2009 04:15 PM by Texasgaloot | 5 comments »

Now that Obama has been inaugurated, I figure it’s safe to say that we might have a new president. I’ve perceived that he’s rather controversial despite the fact that I’ve tried really hard to ignore current events these last few months. I think I’m to where I care a lot more about a thin, wispy shaving coming off of a well-tuned vintage Stanley plane than what people are predicting about the future of our country. My country, dagnabit, sweet land of liberty! So far, I still have the libe...

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View Texasgaloot's profile

Mirrors from my Website blog #3: So What's Wrong With Being a Luddite, Anyway?

09-30-2008 07:57 PM by Texasgaloot | 5 comments »

Warning: the following is written in my blog’s wierd, arcane style… read at your own risk. Once again the literary blog of Chris Schwartz has stimulated my own (somewhat cranked) chain of consciousness toward the philosophical side of woodworking. “The Schwartz” recently offered a very positive review of Roy Underhill’s newest book (the link is here), which wasn’t fair because I can’t go out and buy it yet, and pre-ordering it only makes me feel like I’m 8 years old and it’s t...

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View Brit's profile

Saw Talk #18: Vintage Spear & Jackson 26" Handsaw - Sharpened and Tested

07-18-2012 11:56 PM by Brit | 38 comments »

This was the first saw I bought off ebay. I can’t remember how much I paid, but it wasn’t much. The seller only posted one dark grainy photo, so I didn’t really know what I was getting and at that time I didn’t know what to look for anyway. When it arrived and I removed the wrapping, I literally had goosebumps. I couldn’t get over how beautiful the hand-made tote was. More than once I’ve drifted off into dreamland imagining the work this saw has performed d...

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View Brit's profile

Saw Talk #15: W. Tyzack, Sons & Turner No.120 - Sharpened and Tested

07-06-2012 12:32 AM by Brit | 24 comments »

Well the rain finally stopped today and the sun came out. Looking out on my garden, the squirrels were making the most of it. I sat and watched this youngster somersaulting around the garden, before settling on a branch to devour his morning pine cone. Following his lead, I took the opportunity to get outside and sharpen another saw. Next up is the W. Tyzack, Sons & Turner No.120. Fourteen inches long with a .030” thick plate and an extra heavy spine. This is by far the heaviest ba...

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View Brit's profile

Saw Talk #14: Disston No.5 - Sharpened and tested

06-23-2012 06:38 PM by Brit | 26 comments »

Have you ever thought about why some saw makers add negative rake to the teeth of their rip saws? I have, but when I was drawing a 12 TPI template in Sketchup to re-tooth my Disston No.5 carcass saw, I realized that adding a touch of rake actually increases the volume of space between the teeth. If you look at a section through a saw file, you’ll see that you have an equilateral triangle (ignoring the rounded corners that define the gullets) and we know that the three angles of a triangle ...

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View Brit's profile

Saw Talk #16: Disston D8 - My first Crosscut Sharpening

07-14-2012 08:22 PM by Brit | 30 comments »

I managed to grab a few hours when it wasn’t raining and decided to sharpen Big Joe, the first of my crosscut backsaws. I got ¾ of the way through filing in new teeth and my file gave out. I’ve ordered some more files which should be here early next week, so I’ll return to Big Joe in a future post. I didn’t want to waste the day however, so I decided to sharpen a handsaw instead – a first for me. Some months ago, I restored a couple of 26” Disston D8s. This one is 8PPI (points per in...

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View Blake's profile

Hand Tool Journey #4: Building a Work Bench

10-13-2009 02:36 AM by Blake | 18 comments »

I did a trade for some woodwork with a guy who had a garage full of lumber and several nice hand tools. Most of the lumber was Oak. I don’t really like working with Oak. But I thought it would be perfect for a bench, and there was enough of it. I got lots of different lengths and widths. Most of it was 3/4”. I forgot to take a “before” photo of the stack but here is a sample: Now I intend to make a nice, sturdy bench, but its going to be more functional than ...

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