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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'hand tools'

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• Two-Tier Side Table #8: Some Assembly Required

05-14-2018 11:38 PM by Ron Aylor | 10 comments »

Some Assembly Required –  With all of the zig-zag decorated aprons and three of the carved sides complete, I though it time to cut mortises and dry fit the table frame together. I must say it was quite fun channeling my inner Peter Follansbee, but it’s time to put away the carving tools and get out the joinery tools …  … but first … I took the time to make two interlocking trays to hold my newly acquired gouges. All I have used so far is No. 7 straight gouges – 20mm & 10...

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• Two-Tier Side Table #7: My Very First Lunette

05-07-2018 11:58 AM by Ron Aylor | 16 comments »

My Very First Lunette -  Having completed the zig-zag decoration on the aprons, I took my first steps toward some real  carving. To avoid undue marring of my bench, I decided to nail the work-piece to a 1×6 … which I secured to the bench via bar clamps. As mentioned earlier, I’ll be carving lunettes in the sides of the second tier. In architecture, a lunette is a half-moon shaped space. After laying out the lunettes with compass and awl …  … I took a deep breath and mad...

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• Two-Tier Side Table #6: Zig-Zags

05-03-2018 05:59 PM by Ron Aylor | 15 comments »

Zig-Zags - I mentioned earlier that I was going to have a chopped zig-zag decoration at the bottom of the aprons. This decoration is seen quite often on 17th-century furniture. It is also know as a sawtooth or serration decoration. To create the pattern, I cut a 1/8” x 1” rebate in the face of the stock, by first creating a shoulder with my kerfing plane …  … chopping out waste with a chisel …  ... and then using a rebate plane to smooth things out …  I then laid out the zig...

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Techniques #1: Cutting 135 degree dovetails

05-02-2018 11:33 PM by Dave Polaschek | 9 comments »

I couldn’t find anyone describing how to cut dovetails for non-square corners, so I decided to write this up. This trick will work for any angle dovetails, but you’ll have to change up the workholding jigs. This is a description of how to cut dovetails for a 135 degree corner. This is the angle used on an octagonal box (if all the angles are equal). They’re not perfect, and there’s probably a better way to do it, but this is the best I found. My first try cutting 135 degree dovetails us...

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• Two-Tier Side Table #5: I Can't Carve

05-02-2018 06:45 PM by Ron Aylor | 8 comments »

I Can’t Carve –  Well … not yet  anyway! I need a proper carving mallet … can’t very well use one of these guys …  Hmmm … I bet there’s a mallet inside this tulip poplar branch …                 After cutting a billet, removing the bark, and attacking one end with a hatchet … it was off the the old spring pole lathe.  After about an hour or two … presto! This should work just fine.  It feels great in my hand and has a good bit of heft. So now  it’s time to ...

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• Two-Tier Side Table #4: Hepplewhite Visits Plymouth

05-01-2018 10:46 PM by Ron Aylor | 8 comments »

Hepplewhite Visits Plymouth –  I have all the ash for the frame roughed out and partially jointed. I’ll tackle the shelf and top when the time comes. Before I cut mortise and tenon joints and assemble the frame ...                  … I going to try my hand at a bit of carving! Seventeenth-Century New England carving to be more specific. I’ve been studying Peter Follansbee’s work for quite some time, and thought I’d dress-up this Hepplewhite-ish  two-tier table j...

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• Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #4: Side Rails and a Test Drive

04-15-2018 11:28 PM by Ron Aylor | 14 comments »

Side Rails and a Test Drive –  After reorienting the horse and the cart, I used my tenoning clamp & chairmarker's tenon saw ...   … to create a tenon at one end of each of the two 3/4” x 1” cherry side rails.   I then cut 3/8” x 3/4” x 1-3/8” through mortises in the handles …  ... to accept the side rails.                 After a quick check for squareness …  I assembled one end of the saw and attached the blade …  … It was then that I was able to determine the len...

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• Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #3: Cart Before the Horse

04-14-2018 08:09 PM by Ron Aylor | 18 comments »

Cart Before the Horse –  I know I said I was going to attach the side rails next, but as I was ripping these parts …  … it dawned on me that I didn’t know how long they needed to be. I wouldn’t know the length until the blade attachment pieces were in place. So, once I laid out their shape on a cherry board, I drilled holes for the blade pins …                 … cut mortises for the handles to pass through …  … making sure everything stayed square …  … and tight.            ...

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• Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #2: Handles

04-13-2018 06:59 PM by Ron Aylor | 10 comments »

Handles - Having cut out the first handle with a coping saw, I used files and rasps to further define the shape.                 I then transferred the shape to another cherry board and started all over again.  I think these two handles are pretty close …  ... especially when viewed at three feet apart … LOL!  Overall this saw will be approximately 40” long and 20” wide. Next I need to cut the 3/4” x 1” side rails, and joint them, via through mortise and tenon, to the handles before tac...

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• Eighteenth-Century Frame Saw #1: The Want

04-13-2018 03:01 PM by Ron Aylor | 15 comments »

The Want - For years I have been resawing stock with a rip cut handsaw … both hardwoods …  … and softwoods.  Although this has proven successful, I have always wanted to add a frame saw to my arsenal, for this purpose. I have hesitated, up to now, for the sole reason of blade attachment. I have seen many different methods using tubular steel with inset bolts for blade tension, but I do not have the capacity to work with metal.  I recently obtained a copy of TOOLS: Working Wood in Eight...

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