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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'carving'

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View shouldwood's profile

Woodcarving project #4

02-04-2011 04:51 PM by shouldwood | 13 comments »

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View jeremyslat's profile

ROUTERS HAVE SO MANY USES

02-03-2011 03:37 AM by jeremyslat | 2 comments »

Hello fellow woodworkers, I was messing around in the woodshop with my BIG BOSCH ROUTER and just thinking about how useful it can be. It’s amazing to me how you can put just about any edge on a piece of wood and give that nice or unique look. It’s that uniqueness people are looking for in a project no matter what type it is. I’ve read many books and articles on routing but haven’t yet tried everything there is to accomplish with a router. I’m learning slo...

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View mpounders's profile

carving "Thunderbolt" #7: Heads Up!

01-31-2011 06:53 PM by mpounders | 6 comments »

I got the head finished and glued on this weekend! It turned out ok…ears may be a bit long?You may notice that the ears are slightly darker…...they were soaked with the thin CA glue after carving, to strengthen this delicate area. Pretty sturdy now. Carving is “subtractive-sculpture” in that you take away wood to create. And a lot of what you “see” is what is also the negative spaces created. The shadows that are created give depth and create ill...

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View MasterSergeant's profile

Collapsible Castles, my first

01-29-2011 12:47 AM by MasterSergeant | 3 comments »

Being new to the “blogging” stuff here I go. Let me start out by saying I am new to woodworking and my goal is to learn how to 1. use my used/new woodworking equipment safely and efficiently and 2. learn how to cut/carve/sculpture wood into beautify/functional items. I want to be able to complete the interior trim work on the house my wife and I just built. I wanted to learn how to use my new Jet 18” band-saw first and foremost. I just completed a pretty neat little ...

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View mpounders's profile

carving "Thunderbolt" #6: Shrinking Heads?

01-27-2011 07:39 PM by mpounders | 3 comments »

I quickly discovered I had way too much wood for this head, much too wide! So I spent a lot of time whittling it down to a better fit! I may have to shrink it a bit more, but I am still mainly trying to get the rough shapes. Better too much than not enough I suppose. I did add some difficulty to the carving by choosing to do the mane like I have. With a mane that just lays down on the neck, you can just round over and shape the neck, then carve your hair out of that. Since this sti...

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View mpounders's profile

carving "Thunderbolt" #5: saddle completed and starting to get a head

01-26-2011 05:25 PM by mpounders | 10 comments »

Finished the simple details on the saddle and have the horn stuck in place temporarily. It may need to be cut down a bit more. I would normally do the stirrups, but you can’t see many saddle details when the rider is mounted. I used a stoning technique on the cowboy’s chaps to try and give the effect of angora or goat-skin chaps….may need to do it a bit heavier. “Stoning” is a process of using a dremel or other rotary tool with an abrasive wheel or cyl...

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View mpounders's profile

carving "Thunderbolt" #4: finishing muscle groups and starting the saddle

01-24-2011 07:38 AM by mpounders | 6 comments »

He’s starting to look like a horse now, with the muscle groups indicated. I spent quite a bit of time getting the spacing better between the legs and defining the groups of muscles around the legs. A technique I like is to carve the lines and then to sand them so that you get a flowing muscle look instead of something defined by a line cut into the surface. I like to use my veiners for this and then carve or sand the edges back up to the center. Here are a few pictures. When ...

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View mpounders's profile

carving "Thunderbolt" #3: Feets Finished!

01-21-2011 07:04 AM by mpounders | 11 comments »

I have spent several days working on the feet and legs and finally have the body ready for glue-up. As mentioned in the previous installment, the body is made of two separate pieces to make it easier to carve certain portions and to orient the grain for strength. It is definitely easier to carve and shape the interior portions of the legs and the legs are one of the more difficult elements to carve. They are somewhat delicate because of the thin-ness and you have to support them carefully...

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View Dennis Zongker's profile

Carved, "Methodist Flames" 3"thick x 4'-0" wide x 14'-0" long

01-20-2011 02:42 AM by Dennis Zongker | 34 comments »

We have the honor of creating these beautiful Methodist flames to be placed on the back wall, behind the sanctuary stage. Constructed of solid red oak hardwoods, the overall sizes of the flames are 3” thick by 48”wide and 168” long. The oak was glued together at different angles, to create a unique woodgrain appearance. Hand shaping and carved using a power grinder to create the flame motif. Stained with a red aniline dye and finished with a pre-catalyzed furniture fin...

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View Rogue's profile

Rogue Fine Living #1: Natural Lines- the work of Jeffro Uitto

01-19-2011 12:34 AM by Rogue | 0 comments »

If you’re a crab or a seagull on the Washington coast, there is one guy that has just become a part of the coastal scenery. His rugged figure just blends into the coastline. Blending in is helped by the fact that he’s usually lugging around a piece of drift wood that is commonplace on the inlet near Tokeland. His bent form under the weight of the wet wood perfectly mimics the shape of the gnarled piece he carries. (Read the rest of the artical at http://roguefineliving.com/)

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