LumberJocks

Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'basswood'

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View MyChipCarving's profile

Learn How to Chip Carve - Lesson 2, Two-Sided Chips

03-13-2015 01:45 PM by MyChipCarving | 2 comments »

Learn How to Chip Carve - Lesson 2, Two-Sided Chips

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View OregonBurls's profile

Oregon Woodturners Symposium

03-10-2015 05:55 PM by OregonBurls | 4 comments »

It has been a while sense I have posted any thing. I hope not to be a stranger. Life is crazy with all the travel and all the other stuff that I do. It seems like I only have time for family and business. Just got back from the symposium. It was their first and it went great! Met lots of new people. I think my favorite moments are when I get to meet people who have been my clients for years and I get to meet them in person for the first time. and of course seeing old friends that I only ge...

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View pjones46's profile

Finishing Tips #6: Homemade Blotch Control Instructions

02-07-2015 06:04 AM by pjones46 | 4 comments »

Many people have contacted me concerning the specific mixing instructions to make homemade blotch control and specifics as to its application. So here they are. Mixing instructions Glue size is most commonly made of a watered-down, water-based, PVA adhesive. If you do plan to make your own, try something on the order of 10 parts (or a little less) water to one part Gorilla White Wood Glue. The ratios may vary with species and porosity of the wood. Use: Distilled Water (Can be pur...

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View parsonpaul's profile

For Drew

02-02-2015 03:00 PM by parsonpaul | 7 comments »

I recently completed this for a family whose son passed away from cancer last year at 4 years old. He loved trains and I found this image through a Google search. The picture was one of my favorites of him and a train. The lower right side is a copy of his first time writing his name.I was privileged to be asked to attempt this project. The finished size is like 16 by 20 from basswood. I applied Ipswich Pine stain and about 4 coats of gloss lacquer. I was inspired and informed by the ...

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View pjones46's profile

Finishing Info for the Woodworker #2: Wood Prep Before Finishing

01-20-2015 03:40 AM by pjones46 | 1 comment »

Wood prep before finishing The secret to perfect finish is proper sanding of your project. All surfaces should be clean and free from all dirt and oils. Prep sanding is done with progressively finer grits. On unfinished wood, prepare the surface by using medium grit paper first, and then progress to finer grades. With most raw woods, if you are hand sanding, start sanding in the direction of the grain using a #100-150 grit paper before staining and work up to #220 grit paper. You can make ...

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View pjones46's profile

Finishing Info for the Woodworker #1: What are the differences between stains and dyes

01-09-2015 09:41 PM by pjones46 | 2 comments »

What are the differences between stains and dyes? Very simply put: With stains, the pigment tends to remain on the surface of the wood and lodge in the pores, while dyes penetrate deeply and color the wood from within. Dyes Dyes are colorants that are usually mixed in a carrier vehicle (solvents) such as mineral spirits, water or alcohol. The dyes used in woodworking are characterized as transparent, as they bring about color changes in wood without obscuring the figure. The molecul...

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View pjones46's profile

Finishing Process of Interest #1: Chemical Ebonizing

01-07-2015 01:36 PM by pjones46 | 4 comments »

A while back, I put together a set of links of random finishing topics which I posted in my blog, called Finishing Tips #5: Finishing tips #5. One of the links listed coved the topic of Chemical-Ebonizing as I saw an interest from some concerning the procedure, so this is the time to single out that process. This process does not use dye, ink or paint, and can be carried out quite easily. As a matter of formality follow proper safety precautions such as wearing safety glasses, hand prot...

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View xraydav's profile

Mary May's on line wood carving lessons ***AND turning blanks for carving a Philly Highboy rosette #2: Moving beyond the first 13 online lessons..

10-19-2014 01:54 AM by xraydav | 1 comment »

Didn’t think when I signed up for online carving lessons that there would be any interaction with the teacher. I was wrong. You get to ask questions, make comments and post your completed lessons for feedback. If you check out Mary May’s online carving lessons you will see that in and amongst the 50+ video lessons, there are the first 13 lessons. The basics. These take you through different kinds of gouges and chisels, sharpening those gouges and chisels. Sharpening a V Ch...

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View bobkberg's profile

Wooden Spoon Material Experiment

08-13-2014 01:55 AM by bobkberg | 5 comments »

My wife loves her wooden spoons, but after many years, they warp and crack and eventually fall apart. So I started wondering what the best material to make a wooden spoon out of might be. I bought 10 small samples of hardwoods and cut them all to roughly the size that could serve as the bowl of a wooden spoon. So I have 10 pieces of wood roughly 5” long, 2 1/2” wide and 7/16” thick. I started with those and put them into a large stock pot with 4 gallons of water a...

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View Ronbrush's profile

Making Wooden Flowers #7: Making a Leaf Stem

05-17-2014 04:01 PM by Ronbrush | 0 comments »

Wire SizeIn making flower stems, I use several gauges of galvanized wire, ranging from 14 GA to 30 GA as well as single strands from picture wire. Although some people use thin brass tubing (available from hobby shops), I have found that wires of varying gauges are sufficient to create a pleasing result for this project. I use two gauges of wire for each flower. The thicknesses will depend on the size of your flower – bigger flower, thicker wire. The heaviest gauge will form the flower stem a...

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