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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'barn'

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Around The Shop.. #2: 1200sqft Barn Shop Setup ..part 1

09-09-2016 01:54 AM by Airframer | 11 comments »

Well.. It has been a while since my last blog post and wanted to catch everyone up on what’s going on around the shop. In February I purchased a house just outside of town on 1.17 acres of land. The house needed (still does) a lot of work but it came with a 1200sqft pole barn with a loft! The loft is about half the size of the down stairs so it has roughly 1800sqft of usable space in it. This is a serious upgrade from the 2 car garage I had in my last rental and heaps better ...

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Building a Goat Barn #18: The Hobbit Door

12-10-2014 03:01 PM by David Bareford | 6 comments »

At long last, the only thing remaining was the door. Now, as I have mentioned earlier, my daughter Eleanor (10 yrs old) has read The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, and she really wanted me to put a round door on the barn like a hobbit hole. Well, as luck would have it, I found a free Craigslist posting for a company that had what appeared to be a side of a massive construction spool: it was a huge circle, 7-1/2 feet in diameter and 1-1/2” thick, made of of 1” x 6” pin...

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Building a Goat Barn #17: Windows!

11-13-2014 03:40 PM by David Bareford | 3 comments »

My daughters wanted the barn to be “hobbit-style,” complete with a round door. So, for the wall on the “human side” that will be visible from most of the property, I wanted to find a round window to match. Again through a free find on Craigslist from a floor and door company, I managed to acquire 2 beveled half-round and two rectangular door lites, double -paned: For the “goat-side” window, I was also able to get 6 15” double-paned squares from...

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Building a Goat Barn #16: New Residents

11-11-2014 05:41 PM by David Bareford | 1 comment »

As you may have noticed in the last post, the barn is already occupied. True, the walls aren’t even done, but friends of our were thinning their herd and offered us a doe and a wether, so I asked for a couple of weeks and quickly built a 20’ x 25’ paddock and partioned the interior of the barn off to separate the goat lounging area, kidding stall, and sleeping platform from the human side that houses the hay crib, the feeder rack, and the access to nest boxes and feed/water ...

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Building a Goat Barn #15: Cordwood Walls at last!

11-11-2014 05:19 PM by David Bareford | 6 comments »

My wife and I have been interested in building with cordwood for almost 5 years now. Initially, we planned to use the technique to build our Washington home ourselves but we found great home that was already built that saved us the work. Cordwood masonry is a centuries-old technique that uses short, debarked logs (like you might use for firewood) set in mortar to form structural walls or else fill in a timber frame structure. It’s a great way to use woods that otherwise would not be ...

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Building a Goat Barn #14: Covering the Roof

11-11-2014 04:14 PM by David Bareford | 2 comments »

If you’ve been following this blog series at all, you’ll know it’s been a lo-o-o-ong time since my last entry. Rest assured, I haven’t been idle—quite the contrary, I’ve been too busy to think about documenting and photographing a lot of the work. But, here’s a catch up of the roof. Rafters and purlins make a great roof for a gazebo, but a lousy roof for a barn to keep out rain. The covering starts with burlap. While not strictly necessary, the fir...

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Building a Goat Barn #13: Purlin Madness

08-15-2014 03:30 PM by David Bareford | 3 comments »

After the rafters were raised and secured last Saturday, we moved on to attaching the purlins. These are the radial pieces between the rafters that will hold up the roofing material. In our case, these are fashioned from alder branches or saplings, with the bark left on, nailed to the rafters with about a 4-inch spaced between them so that there is room for the purlins on the adjacent sides to attach. It was great to have a “ground crew” of people to hand up purlins of the ...

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Building a Goat Barn #12: Barn Raising Day!

08-12-2014 03:45 PM by David Bareford | 4 comments »

Well, the long-awaited barn raising day finally arrived this past Saturday, and my family in the area arrived to help. Wrestling eight 14-foot rafters was definitely a portion of the barn build that I could not accomplish alone. Of course, like any good barn raising, the family brought food, we grilled out, and we made a day of it. The first order of business was to explain to my “crew” what we would be doing. The barn’s roof is supported by reciprocal frame rafters, a te...

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Building a Goat Barn #11: Starting on the Paddock Fence

08-06-2014 01:42 PM by David Bareford | 6 comments »

The barn raising is Saturday, so in the meantime, I’m attending to some other related things that need to be done, but that won’t get in the way of the ladders, braces, and people that will need to be in and around the structure in order to get the rafters in the air. So, I’ve been done smaller projects like building out the next boxes for the chicken coop, teaching my wife how to stack the rafters, etc. Another big project that needs doing is the paddock, the holding and...

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Building a Goat Barn #10: Testing Out the Reciprocal Frame Rafters

08-04-2014 01:34 PM by David Bareford | 6 comments »

Inspired by Simon Dale's Low Impact Woodland Home, the roof for the barn will be held up by reciprocal frame rafters rather than a ridge peak or a truss system. This will allow a clear span beneath without support poles. Other web resources about this kind of roof can be found at the Year of Mud blog and at Green Building Elements. This weekend, I tested out the reciprocal frame concept on the ground ust to make sure the voodoo works before I tried it ten feet in the air. First, I brought ...

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