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View mafe's profile

Japanese tools #14: Japanese toolbox - finish drawer, wood nails and final details.

06-11-2012 09:39 AM by mafe | 48 comments »

Japanese toolbox大工の道具箱 Here we are part three of the build.Last blog we made the drawer lock parts and other stuff, now it’s time for drawer parts and the nailing of the box. This was where we left last, right there on the floor. Drawer parts ready, front with wood lock made. And here is the drawing I made for the drawer, following traditional Japanese cabinetmaker ways. The drawer back gets its rabbet.And I get to test my Veritas mini shoulder plane (it works fantast...

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View Mark A. DeCou's profile

How To Build Your Own Powder Horn; Some Simple Steps w/ Photos of Finished Scrimshaw Covered Horns

11-12-2007 07:31 PM by Mark A. DeCou | 8 comments »

Birth of a Powder Horn 101: A Lumberjock’s “Short Version” to Crafting A Powder Horn By Mark A. DeCou (All photos, text, and design is protected by copyright November 12, 2007) www.decoustudio.com =============================== UPDATE 9-25-2012:This past summer I had four students at the John C. Campbell Folk School class on Powder Horn Building and Scrimshaw Artwork. We had a good time together and accomplished some great work. Click the Widget Picture to go ...

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View Div's profile

The most expensive wood in the world?

07-01-2010 09:28 PM by Div | 41 comments »

I just looked through the latest price list from one of our local timber merchants. The most expensive wood listed is African Blackwood (dalbergia melanoxylon). It is also known as Mozambique ebony or Congo wood. It is listed at a price of ZAR440 000 per cubic meter. ZAR is South African Rand. We use the metric system, same as Europe, so let me Americanize….One meter = 39.37”. A cubic metre equals 39.37” x 39.37” x 39.37” = 61023.38 cubic inches…. A board foot is 144 cubic inches…. T...

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View mafe's profile

Japanese tools #1: Japanese hand plane KANNA setup

07-29-2011 01:30 AM by mafe | 28 comments »

Japanese hand plane setupFitting, tuning and sharpening. If you are looking for ‘ready out of the box’ just leave this blog now!This blog is for those who want to understand their tools, to trim, adjust and become the master of your tool.It is not a show off, not a tool gloat, but two basic Japanese hand planes going from useless to being used. Reading Toshio Odate’s inspire ring words in his book ‘Japanese woodworking tools their tradition spirit and use’ where ...

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View rance's profile

Virtual Designs in Sketchup #5: Rolling Wood Storage Rack

06-06-2011 07:22 PM by rance | 12 comments »

I’ve seen several variations of these rolling wood storage units. Inspired by them, I came up with this one for a friend of mine: It incorporates storage for long lumber, sheet goods, and small turning blocks as well. About the only thing I might add would be dowel storage of some kind. Truth be told, I’d probably just put them in tubes and store them on one of the shelves. It is a typical A-Frame design with half lapped joints. For economy, most of the stick material is...

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View dakremer's profile

How to Build a Sofa/Couch #5: Sofa upholstery complete, legs next....

05-27-2010 10:57 PM by dakremer | 18 comments »

Hey LJ’s. So I have the upholstery of the sofa frame complete. The only thing left as far as upholstery, is the seat cushion and pillows!! My next step is making the legs. This is where I need some advice from you guys. I was planning on making some legs that are really big and bulky, probably either black or dark shade of brown (like walnut), but I was wondering what you guys think? I was also thinking about only doing 1 long seat cushion. I kind of like the fact of not having a...

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View GnarlyErik's profile

Shop Tips & Tricks #12: Making Long, Round Things in Wood - with the Norwegian Dowel Cutter

04-15-2013 11:10 PM by GnarlyErik | 5 comments »

Sometimes you need long round parts made from wood. Prior to the 19th century, specially made wooden dowels often served where nails, screws and bolts are used today. For instance, in barn building and shipbuilding, ‘trunnels’ were used to fasten timbers together and planks to a ships ribs. Outside of lacking the strength of of metal, trunnels are not affected by electrolysis and do not rust, important considerations in ships – although of course they can eventually rot. The word ‘trunn...

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View Rembo's profile

making curved doors #1: making curved doors

11-17-2011 08:42 AM by Rembo | 9 comments »

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View lew's profile

Kitchen Treasures #1 Making the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin #4: Glue Up and Trimming The Blank- The Final Steps

10-06-2008 01:45 AM by lew | 14 comments »

Before starting this section, I forgot to add to pix into the previous post. This is the spacer strip used to reposition the blanks for the second cut. The spacer goes between the blank and the fence. This shows the blank seated against the rear stop and the blank is labeled to assure it is not reversed during the various cutting operations. I found it easier to glue if I oriented the blank with the diagonal cut facing up. I use an old restaurant cutting board as a gluing wor...

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View JL7's profile

Tips for Building a Freestyle End Grain Cutting Board

11-12-2013 05:04 PM by JL7 | 21 comments »

Lately I’ve been building some end grain boards that don’t follow the “traditional” convention of the repeating pattern from one end to the other. Examples: I call them Freestyle boards. I put together a video that shows some cutting and gluing tips: I really don’t have a lot of detail photos of some of the more complex blocks but I will share what I have so far: These are some of the shapes: The diamond shapes were inspire...

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