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Woodworking Business #5: Consistent Quality and Guarantees

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Blog entry by billb posted 1388 days ago 768 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Contracting For The Work Part 5 of Woodworking Business series Part 6: Two Woodworking Business Blogs »

It’s obvious from reading the comments here that all of you are concerned with the quality of your work in addition to getting paid. I believe that consistently delivering quality work is essential to success. Cutting corners is never a good idea and will usually cost you more in the long run. My experience was that when I fully satisfied a customer they became a good salesperson for my work.

Policy 4 – Consistently deliver the highest possible quality and make certain that the customer is fully satisfied with the work. Guarantee the quality of your work and when things go wrong, fix it promptly. Charge enough for your work so you don’t have to nickel and dime your customers for small items. Treat every customer as if they were the most important part of your business because they are.

-- Bill, Austin, Texas, http://woodworking-business.com



6 comments so far

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2690 posts in 1702 days


#1 posted 1388 days ago

Well said Bill…. I always look at my work as an extension of me. Weather it is my paying day job or a nice little box I make…. My name is on it, and it represents me. I can not expect someone else to think my work is quality unless I do. As my wife says “I am my worst critic”.... I don’t think that is a bad thing.

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View Dez's profile

Dez

1113 posts in 2702 days


#2 posted 1388 days ago

Someone besides the customer should be your worst critic – please your worst critic and the customer will be much easier to please!

-- Folly ever comes cloaked in opportunity!

View Maveric777's profile

Maveric777

2690 posts in 1702 days


#3 posted 1388 days ago

Well said Dez….

-- Dan ~ Texarkana, Tx.

View billb's profile

billb

112 posts in 1570 days


#4 posted 1388 days ago

Dan and Dez, my wife tells me that I’m my own worse critic and I think she’s right. Sometimes I would see some small thing that no one else noticed but I fixed it anyway because it was bothering me. I was raised in construction and that’s what I learned, build everything as if your signature appears on it.

-- Bill, Austin, Texas, http://woodworking-business.com

View dbray45's profile

dbray45

2488 posts in 1402 days


#5 posted 1388 days ago

Two things to keep in mind – Quality, by definition, is what is acceptable and second – perception counts more than reality. I have seen absolute junk being very acceptable and someone else do tremendous work for the same deliverable and get thrown out – at the same price.

I guess the moral of this story – know your customer very well and know exactly what your deliverables are supposed to be – in your customer’s mind, your idea may be quite different.

I have learned to choose my customers very carefully.

-- David in Damascus, MD

View billb's profile

billb

112 posts in 1570 days


#6 posted 1365 days ago

I found out the hard way that knowing your customer means listening attentively. I was hired to build a small desk in a kitchen area and, in addition to a complete explanation, the customer asked me to go by this house down the block and take a look at the one there because it was exactly what they wanted. Unfortunately, I knew better and just built them a beautiful small desk. When I delivered it they said it was lovely but it was not what they wanted. I told them to go ahead and use it until I finished building another one and I finally did go see the one at the other house. Sure enough, it was quite different and much easier to build. So, I built one just like it and delivered it the next week and they were thrilled. They considered it great customer service and I got tons of work in the neighborhood because of their referrals. It turned out fine and I used the first desk I built in my own shop office for many years but taking a moment to actually listen to the customer would have saved me a lot of time and money.

-- Bill, Austin, Texas, http://woodworking-business.com

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