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Hall Table Designs Would like Your Feedback

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Blog entry by bfd posted 12-03-2008 03:44 AM 8228 reads 0 times favorited 23 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I recently picked up some 8/4 Walnut and a beautiful piece of 4/4 Jatoba. I have decided to build a Hall table and have come up with two designs that would exploit the grain of the Jatoba. I would like your input on which design you lean toward.

Idea 1 is modern and the concept is that the frame is mitered in two directions to create a continuous “ribbon” of walnut that is unbroken. I will either do a contrasting keyed miter joint or a miter slip joint. I may or may not have a edge detail. If I do an edge I would do a chamfer on the underside of the top. dimensions: 11”d x 60”w x 29”h

Idea 2 is a classic Parson’s style hall table and is timeless. Looks simple right? Well if I do this I would attempt to do the frame with a Triple Miter Joint. dimensions: 11”d x 54”w x 29”h



23 comments so far

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4440 posts in 2717 days


#1 posted 12-03-2008 04:05 AM

Idea #2 does more for me than 1. I don’t like the fact that #1 has a top that doesn’t cover the leg structure. Maybe I’m not modern enough. The corner treatment on #2 looks difficult and should be a challenge. A great learning experience.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Alan 's profile

Alan

51 posts in 2672 days


#2 posted 12-03-2008 04:28 AM

I think the Parson’s table design is a little too conventional, at least for my taste. As you say, it’s timeless, but been there, done that, you know? I don’t think it would be the best way to show off the Jatoba

The first design let’s your eye focus more on the jatoba, but the top seems a little narrow for the base. It looks like it’s just sitting on top. If you can make it as wide as the base and “float” it with little risers recessed under the top so you don’t see them, it’ll draw your eye to it even more. You’ll still get the effect of the walnut ribbon, but the top will be the star.

I’m not sure about the shelf. It might be a little distracting, but it does provide additional display space. Maybe try the drawing without it and see how it works.

Hope I wasn’t too negative. I tend to look at things pretty analytically. Either design has its good points and the joinery on the Parson’s table would certainly be a challenge.

Good luck with it whichever way you go.

-- Alan Carter, www.alancarterstudio.com

View bfd's profile

bfd

502 posts in 2562 days


#3 posted 12-03-2008 05:03 AM

Thos., Alan & Brian

I really appreciate these kind of comments so thank you for taking time exactly the feed back I am after. You guys have me thinking.

Alan, I like your idea about floating the top on risers and then changing the base to suit. I do like like the option of the second shelf and the additional display space it provides but I might try it without or floating that as well. It is funny I think you hit the nail on the head why I am struggling with the parson style “been there done that” but it would be a challenge and is timeless.

Brian, There is something that is bugging me too about idea 1 but I cannot put my finger on it yet. If I were to flip the base It would look like this (one of my favorite projects on LJ) but it would be too close to Brian’s piece.

Click for details!

To answer your question regarding the expansion of the jatoba in the mitered frame I would treat it like a frame and panel door and allow it to float within the frame.

View Woodhacker's profile

Woodhacker

1139 posts in 2478 days


#4 posted 12-03-2008 05:41 AM

I probably prefer #2 because I’d love to see what you do with the triple miter. I don’t mind the classic style.

I like #1 too, but agree with Brian (of High Point) about flipping the frame. Aesthetically I think it would look better. Functionally, the long runners against the floor in your original design will make it harder to clean underneath. I like Alan’s idea of widening the top slightly and floating the top.

-- Martin, Kansas

View oldskoolmodder's profile

oldskoolmodder

779 posts in 2435 days


#5 posted 12-03-2008 06:00 AM

Brain, as with all your work, I like them both, but I think #1 is the better way to go, but with legs going from front to back maybe?

-- Respect your shop tools and they will respect you - Ric

View EternalDesign's profile

EternalDesign

237 posts in 2750 days


#6 posted 12-03-2008 06:00 AM

Hey dude I think if you go with number one, drop the top two short rails down 3/4 leaving the end grain on the verticals going up that extra 3/4 and sit the top down. Nice to hear you like my table man, i still have that table sitting in the shop covered in dust ha. man i need to sell stuff.

-- Brian, Eternal Furniture & Design http://www.eternal-furniture.com

View EternalDesign's profile

EternalDesign

237 posts in 2750 days


#7 posted 12-03-2008 06:06 AM

Hey dude I think if you go with number one, drop the top two short rails down 3/4 leaving the end grain on the verticals going up that extra 3/4 and sit the top down. Nice to hear you like my table man, I still have that table sitting in the shop covered in dust ha. Man i need to sell stuff.

-- Brian, Eternal Furniture & Design http://www.eternal-furniture.com

View majeagle1's profile

majeagle1

1419 posts in 2251 days


#8 posted 12-03-2008 06:27 AM

I like idea #2, the parson’s table…....... I like the way the walnut “frames” the jatoba.
I love the idea of the triple miter joint. I saw an article on how to do that joint in FWW a couple of years
ago and now I can’t find it, wouldn’t you know. I have always wanted to try it, do you by any chance have
that article?

Can’t wait to see the finished project.

-- Gene, Majestic Eagle Woodworks, http://majesticeagleww.etsy.com/, http://www.flickr.com/photos/majesticeagle/

View EricS's profile

EricS

11 posts in 2293 days


#9 posted 12-03-2008 06:39 AM

Brian, first of all, I like all of your work and really admire your style and craftsmanship. For this table, I definitely like design #1. A couple ideas I might add to what others have already said…I think I would leave the base the way you have it modeled and I do like the shelf, but for the top I would consider floating it vertically up off the base (as opposed to floating it between the legs). The other thing that I think might look good is to shape the top such that it is wider (front to back, not the thickness) at the ends than the middle by cutting subtle curves along the front and back edges. If you have enough material, I would probably make the top cover the base instead of being narrower.

Just throwing some ideas out there to help keep the creativity flowing….

-Eric

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8791 posts in 2854 days


#10 posted 12-03-2008 06:57 AM

Brian,

Love your work, I think there is some great potential in developing either of these designs.

I like EternalDesign Brian’s (love his work too) suggestion of dropping the top down 3/4 for #1

In reference to #2, notice the detail of the negative space created in his project that you used as a sample. It is the space between the panel and the frame the turns into the legs. That is a fantastic detail that many would not pick up on but makes it very sophisticated.

Your joinery detail of the legs for #2 is a great way to go. This stands out in modern designs such as this.

#2 would be great but I would do it with a veneered panel or the expansion issue has to be addressed in the construction.

I like GarageWoodworks Brian (and yes love his work too) comment, “something doesn’t ‘feel’ right about it.” I design on feel and intuition as well. Trust your instincts – use the force Luke. OK, seriously, take in the info and for the next few days walk into the office and look at the pictures. What hits you immediately about each picture? What makes it feel awkward or what creates a good rhythm and flow to the design? The initial impact will tell you a lot about the design.

I am printing these images off of a screen shot and I will look at them again tomorrow.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8791 posts in 2854 days


#11 posted 12-03-2008 07:03 AM

Had to come back.

I like Alan’s suggestion of the floating top effect. He does some great work and has a great vision too.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Maddhatter's profile

Maddhatter

126 posts in 2332 days


#12 posted 12-03-2008 07:04 AM

Brian, number one is the choice for me..
I find the second option a little on the plain side when it comes to both function and style. Good luck with your choice.

-- Norm (AKA - The Maddhatter), Middletown DE

View Maddhatter's profile

Maddhatter

126 posts in 2332 days


#13 posted 12-03-2008 07:04 AM

Brian, number one is the choice for me..
I find the second option a little on the plain side when it comes to both function and style. Good luck with your choice.

-- Norm (AKA - The Maddhatter), Middletown DE

View mmh's profile

mmh

3485 posts in 2477 days


#14 posted 12-03-2008 07:20 AM

I don’t like the legs on #1 and the plain edges look too unfinished, not well executed. The Parsons table is nice, but I think you can incorporate more design to make it a bit more interesting. The thin board does need a frame to accent it and give it more volume.

-- "They who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night." ~ Edgar Allan Poe

View garysharp's profile

garysharp

114 posts in 2235 days


#15 posted 12-03-2008 08:15 AM

Brian, I like the triple miter joint a lot. If you get a chance, give me a call if you have not seen the joint in person. It is one that I teach in the club advanced joint class and I have my sample. Have a nice day. Garysharp

-- Garysharp "When sharpening woodworking tools, good enough,...isn't" “Your life’s complete only when your knowledge passes on”.

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