LumberJocks

My 1st Attempt at Greene and Greene Style Furniture #5: Rolling along

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Don posted 12-19-2010 08:54 AM 2142 reads 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: First glue-up Part 5 of My 1st Attempt at Greene and Greene Style Furniture series Part 6: All cleaned up. »

I didn’t make as much progress as I’d hoped a couple of weeks ago when I posted my last blog but I just started a 2 week break for the holidays and am planning to spend most of it in my shop. With any luck I’ll get these finished before I go back to work.

I hate typing and I do a lot of typing at work so I’m mostly going to let the pictures do the talking:

I’ve got both both frames glued up, here’s one:

One top glued up and ready to cut to size:

Fronts and sides for both drawers milled and fitted:

And a good example of why one should be very carefull using Gorilla glue to make up for sloppy joints. The joints are comming out very strong but it’s difficult to judge just how much glue to use to fill the spaces without having it leak out:

And since I needed to sharpen my new chisels I had to buy yet another new tool. If I had known I would have to buy so many new tools to get through this project I would’ve started something like this a long time ago:

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.



7 comments so far

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3566 days


#1 posted 12-19-2010 06:12 PM

This is coming along great.

I bought a bottle of Gorilla glue a few years ago and never got past using half of it. I did not care for the foaming action and difficult removal of squeeze out.

Don’t be fooled, just because it foams and expands, it is not a structural gap filler. For that you want to use epoxy or epoxy and sawdust.

Gorilla glue is not among my arsenal of adhesives.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Don's profile

Don

514 posts in 2539 days


#2 posted 12-19-2010 08:33 PM

Hey Todd, thanks for the tip. I haven’t used Epoxys very much and not in a very long time but I don’t recall them expanding at all so how would they be used to fill gaps?

In the future my plan is to just cut better joints and use normal wood glue. :) If I had this to do again I would have spent a lot more time praticing the joints with scrap wood before cutting the real joints.

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.

View mpmitche's profile

mpmitche

428 posts in 2442 days


#3 posted 12-19-2010 09:36 PM

I’m with you on the tight joints. Everything that is visible looks very good though and I really like your project, can’t wait to see it finished. Another trick for loose M&T’s is to drawbore the joint; it’s not really very hard to do and makes a very strong joint. I don’t even glue some of my drawbore joints, just be sure your pegs are striaght and strong!

-- Mike, Western New York

View Don's profile

Don

514 posts in 2539 days


#4 posted 12-19-2010 10:23 PM

Thanks for the tip Mike. I had to do a little searching to figure out what you meant by “drawbore” since I hadn’t heard the term before. I was thinking of using my Kreg pocket hole jig to put toe screws in from behind to strengthen them but I like the idea of a drawbore much better. So far the joints all feel quite strong so I think I’ll be okay but we’ll see how they hold up to the stress of handling while I’m working on them.

Now I get to go clean up the mess and hope it doesn’t show through the finish…

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3566 days


#5 posted 12-19-2010 11:04 PM

The epoxy itself will fill & harden to create a structurally sturdy joint if there is a small gap.

If the gap is bigger then you can add sawdust to the epoxy, such as captured in the filter on a R.O sander, to create your filler mix.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8901 posts in 3566 days


#6 posted 12-19-2010 11:09 PM

I would not stress about the joints being sloppy & not holding up on a table such as this. The design itself creates a very enduring piece because of the stretchers at the bottom of the legs.

A table like this does not really get stressed like a chair would. One of the most stressful moments for a table like this is if you have weight on it and start dragging it across the floor which pulls the legs apart from eachother. But that is not really likely, the table is small enough it will be picked up to be moved.

There is no real stress as it just sits in the room with a lamp and books on it.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4808 posts in 2640 days


#7 posted 12-22-2010 06:06 PM

Wow. I, too, just stumbled on your blog.

How cool ! You’re doing a great job !!

-- -- Neil

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com