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Croze - Coopers Tools

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Blog entry by apprentice posted 09-01-2012 06:28 PM 3059 reads 0 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My next full time project is to learn how to cooper, first things I intend doing is making most of the tools and equipment to do the jobs.

Pictured here is my first handmade tool, A Croze, the body is made from English oak, the tool rest/guide in apple and the hand knobs are from Hornbeam.

The blade is handmade in house from 5.00×15.00mm gauge plate, hardened and tempered as all of my blades, the blade is in the ear and clear design fitted to some of the Preston hand routers of old.

The blades sits snugly into the apple guide and held secure with a hand turned 5.00mm thick bronze washer and wing nut.

As I progress through each stage aided by a freind and professional cooper I will reveal all so others can have a go themselves.

My first coopered item will be a Co. Mayo style dash butter churn as seen being made on the film, Cavan Cooper, on the RTE Hands label, filmed back in the early 80’ s.

The sketch below shows a typical diagram of barrel stave, the tool I have just made cuts the square sided slot fot the lid to sit inside creating a water tight seal.


-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded



20 comments so far

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apprentice

201 posts in 855 days


#1 posted 09-01-2012 06:40 PM

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1810 days


#2 posted 09-01-2012 07:18 PM

thanks for sharing :-)

looking forward to see more
and deffently the first tight barrel you come up with

good luck

Dennis

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

11181 posts in 1701 days


#3 posted 09-01-2012 07:25 PM

Very interesting project. Id love to follow along. Do you plan on blogging it, if not i hope you could consider it.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Kookaburra's profile

Kookaburra

748 posts in 919 days


#4 posted 09-01-2012 07:42 PM

I second the request for blogging the process. Coopering has always intrigued me but I do not know much about it. I love that you are making your own tools.

-- Kay - Just a girl who loves wood.

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apprentice

201 posts in 855 days


#5 posted 09-01-2012 08:50 PM

I have tried to get the blog model going before but the android I use won’t let me do things for some reason, so I have done it this way.

Here is a taster of how the old boy does it.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xnjbz4_disk-12-cavan-cooper_shortfilms

My next job is to make the jointer like this one below.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

View Don W's profile

Don W

15269 posts in 1262 days


#6 posted 09-01-2012 09:26 PM

apprentice, I have one of those jointers, https://timetestedtools.wordpress.com/2012/03/05/coopers-plane/

I’d be interested to see how the other coopers tools work.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View apprentice's profile

apprentice

201 posts in 855 days


#7 posted 09-01-2012 09:45 PM

Don

If you watch the link above you could probably have a go at a few of the processes yourself.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

View Don W's profile

Don W

15269 posts in 1262 days


#8 posted 09-02-2012 10:36 AM

maybe someday when time in the shop is a little more plentiful.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View apprentice's profile

apprentice

201 posts in 855 days


#9 posted 09-02-2012 01:41 PM

I would like to point out that the coopering challenge I have just undertaken is the White Coopering method, use for making buckets, milk churns/ and other vessles for storing some dry goods.

The method Ned is using in the film link is the white method, many of the tools made were by the makers themselves and varied slightly but still did the same job.

The dry coopering method for making casks for storing liquors and wines is very similar and involves much higher tolerances and special angles using gauges for getting the staves perfect for holding their valuable contents.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6847 posts in 1846 days


#10 posted 09-04-2012 02:03 AM

Thanks for posting that sketch, I was having trouble understanding what that tool did. I’m looking forward to following along for the rest of the journey.

Watching the video now, I love this stuff.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View apprentice's profile

apprentice

201 posts in 855 days


#11 posted 09-04-2012 12:45 PM

Today I have sellected a nice section of Damson for making my sun or topping plane and prepared the body of the plane for cutting in the mouth.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6847 posts in 1846 days


#12 posted 09-04-2012 01:06 PM

Apprentice, that video was amazing, especially how he puts all of those staves together in the hoop, what skill!

I’ve heard (or read) it said that there is a reason why there are no armature coopers, it aint easy and takes a lot of skill. I’m sure you have skill but this is a pretty ambitious endeavor your on.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View apprentice's profile

apprentice

201 posts in 855 days


#13 posted 09-04-2012 05:41 PM

It is an ambitious project Maurico, but challenges are to be faced, chewed swallowed and digested. Making the tools is the easy bit for me, having the skills as a tool maker, as I go along re-discovering how everything was done before, I have to try getting those new skills honed.

The single most important category is to pass on those skills, and the ability of the person sharing them, as a nation and a whole, society in general has been de-skilled, we here are actually reversing that trend while we live and breath and that’s what counts.

I strongly feel that when our generation has gone we will loose yet another alternative arm to the corporate minds in our midst.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1810 days


#14 posted 09-04-2012 07:33 PM

I think you maybee have right about that apprentice
even in the skills of making and restore old house´s is badly going back
and some of the tecnic´s is already lost … maybee for ever
one good thing is that here in Denmark they have started a school to
let every one who has the interest of learning the old skills
in different trades can join different courses like using/mixing the old naturel paintings
including painting things to loke like they where made of wood or marmor from Italy
or building the roof construction on cornertowers that end in a spike
that was so popular in the 1800 centery

and I think other countrys in europe is doing /already have done the same
but sadly we do have trades here that is lost so much you can´t get the education here anymore

I think we only have one wheelmaker left
when he shuold have his graduation they had to fly masters in from UK to judge his work
a beautyfull crisp lightweight wheel
sadly the old trades will only servive if there is people who burn for it and doesn´t care
if they can live by it or not

only the future will tell

Dennis

View apprentice's profile

apprentice

201 posts in 855 days


#15 posted 09-04-2012 08:30 PM

Hi Dennis

There is a saying. To the man who only has a hammer, everything he encounters begins to look like a nail.

Having said that, I have always shared my knowledge unreservedly with anyone who wanted to help themselves.

For many years now I have sought out the older brains before they either lost interest or passed on, and I am so glad that I did, if the lessons of history teach us anything, it is that nobody learns the lessons that history teaches us.

It is my ambition to hone several skills well and become a journeyman of teaching them.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

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