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Blog entry by apprentice posted 645 days ago 1171 reads 1 time favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My latest tool and project which I made in a day from a local wind blown Laburnum this cutting gauge.
Measuring 4” by 3” by 1-3/16” with a 3/4” stick also from the same timber.
The stick is secured by a disc and side plate setup from the rear of the block by a transverse 10.00mm nickel silver solid rod drilled to take a 6.00 thread which is intersected by an ebony knob which has the 6.00mm bolt cut to length and also threaded and glued into the timber.
Inside the main body hole is a recess to take a side plate and behind that an fitted from the inner surface of the hole is a 5.00mm thick pressure disc which fits snug in the side hole.

The knob has a small shoulder spigot at the junction of the thread and where it enters the block through the 10.00 hole drilled into the end of the block.

In the front lower face I fitted four blind 10.00mm by 4.00mm blind nickel siver discs for asthetics and wear limiting.

The cutter is held in place by drilling a 10.00mm hole in the end of the stick to take a 25.00 by a 10.00 mm rod insert which is drill through its main body and a 6.00mm hole through the stick…. The insert is also drilled and threaded throughout its length to take a 6.00mm Alen grub screw. The blade is held in place via a small nickel packer and the grub which pulls the mech against the stick body when tight.

The blade is made from a piece of HSS industrial metal hacksaw blade and sharpened only on one side with the flat side outermost when in the stick.


-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded



21 comments so far

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#1 posted 645 days ago

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bobasaurus

1125 posts in 1684 days


#2 posted 645 days ago

That’s a fine looking cutting gauge. Though I wish the circular metal insets were symmetrical :) .

-- Allen, Colorado

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DaddyZ

2332 posts in 1540 days


#3 posted 645 days ago

Very Cool !!!

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#4 posted 645 days ago

Thanks guys, there is another gauge coming tomorrow, watch this space.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#5 posted 644 days ago

Here are two more gauges made from English holly and Ebony creating a contrast which I often replicate in my musical instruments.

The cutters have yet to be finished from hight quality gauge plate then hardened and tempered to around59-61 Roc.

Each gauge took about 6 hours each to make alowing for glue drying time, glue used was industrial strength super glue which.gives a glass hard fixing and ideal for timbers like ebony.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#6 posted 644 days ago

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#7 posted 644 days ago

The finished duo, final coating using numerous coats of Danish oil.

All fittings are made in house with nickel silver.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

View JR45's profile

JR45

516 posts in 812 days


#8 posted 641 days ago

Excellent pieces. They look almost too good to use. How did you harden the gauge plate for the cutter?
Jim

-- It always looks better when it's finished!

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#9 posted 641 days ago

JR

I have found two reliable ways of hardening the steel, first heat the metal to a dullish red but not orange/yellow, then quickly dip it in some old used engine oil from your car, as soon as the blade enters the oil whilst stiring constantly to draw the heat away from the metal, keep stirring until the smoking and bubbling has ceased, if you dip it and don’t stir a jacket of hot gasses is created around the steel and it won’t harden properly this enriches the carbon content in the gauge plate mixtures.

Then clean the metal so its shiny again, this time your tempering things by heating the blade from the opposite end of the tip and carefully watch the colours run up the metal, you will see blue at the bottom of the run towards the tip with green, orange and straw yellow at the front, as this straw yellow reaches the cutting surface really quickly drop it in some cold water, this fixes the temper very acurately and good enough for woodwork.

The other method is exactly the same but using a good quality cooking oil like Canola the hydrogenated kind.

Or if you can get it, whale oil is by far the best for quenching and why many of the older tools are superb.

Its all in the colours to which a straw tip the one your loking for, blue would be too brittle.

I nearly forgot to say, shape and sharpen your blade before hardening and tempering or you will be there all day, also be careful not to blue the very end/tip during tempering.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

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JR45

516 posts in 812 days


#10 posted 640 days ago

Many thanks for this info. I recently tried to make a birdcage awl and my attempts at hardening resulted in a point that was more like fudge than Thornton’s toffee!! Back to the blow torch.
Jim

-- It always looks better when it's finished!

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#11 posted 640 days ago

The metal I use for making pricking awls is silver steel and standard gauge plate for making blades.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#12 posted 637 days ago

The latest to the Laburnum line up is this other classic shape from the mid 1800’s with nickel silver fittings and a natural horn nipping knob.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#13 posted 629 days ago

Showing my version of a double edged marking knife, cuts in both directions and with the blade right at the end of the stick its good for getting into those tight spaces.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6693 posts in 1651 days


#14 posted 617 days ago

Wow! I need one of these.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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apprentice

201 posts in 659 days


#15 posted 587 days ago

My latest gauge is also made from wind blown laburnum, in an oval guise this time and a little plainer, donning a slightly thicker stick at 7/8”, this also incorpotates the stick end double cutter as others, and a flush fitting nickel silver nip screw.

-- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qcyhgsGA6mY&feature=player_embedded

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