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Grease Box, Grease Recipe #1: Cream Furniture Polish Recipe

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Blog entry by Jamie Speirs posted 1310 days ago 4442 reads 38 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Cream Furniture Polish Recipe
Furniture Preparation Oil Recipe or (Furniture Cream)
Ingredients:
32 oz 1.8lt Pure Turpentine (Not Turpentine Substitute or White Spirit)
16 oz 908ml Boiled Linseed Oil
8 oz 450g Beeswax
1 oz 225g Carnauba Wax Flakes
• Grate the Beeswax in a double bowl with hot water in the larger bowl (like a double boiler). Add linseed oil, stir well. Add Pure Turpentine, stir well.
• There are double boilers available for wax candle making. They are expensive though and unless you are intending production.

Beeswax Paste Recipe
Ingredients:
8oz 450g 50% by weight Beeswax
8oz 450g 50% by volume Pure Turpentine (Not Turpentine Substitute or White Spirit)
1 oz 25g Carnauba Wax (optional, this makes a much harder wax)
• Grate the Beeswax in a double bowl with hot water in the larger bowl (like a double boiler). Add Carnauba Wax, stir well. Add Pure Turpentine, stir well or Put the grated wax into a jar and shake until it dissolves. Leave it for 24hrs to set

Liming Wax
Ingredients:
8oz 450g 46% by weight Beeswax
8oz 450g 46% by volume Pure Turpentine (Not Turpentine Substitute or White Spirit)
5oz 125g 8% by weight White Pigment (tiO2)
1 oz 25g Carnauba Wax (optional, this makes a much harder wax)

• Grate the Beeswax in a double bowl with hot water in the larger bowl (like a double boiler). Add Carnauba Wax, stir well. Add Pure Turpentine, stir well add white Pigment stir well or Put the grated wax & White Pigment into a jar and shake until it dissolves. Leave it for 24hrs to set

How to use Liming Wax:
To prepare an item of furniture for liming, sand the wood smooth and remove any traces of grease or dirt by wiping the surface with a cloth dipped in white spirits (mineral spirits/paint thinner).
Then, and usually, most woods and substrates will benefit from opening the grain with a wire brush or coarse paper. Using a clean wire brush, or coarse paper, scrub and travel on the wood or substrate in the direction of the grain, to clean out and to open the pores. Be careful not to be too aggressive. Check the progress quite regularly by glancing across the wood into the light, ensuring that there is a fairly even distribution of open pores. If required, apply wood dye and seal the surface with a coat of thin transparent shellac. Applying Liming Wax.
Apply sparingly with a cotton cloth or pad, rubbing well into the grain, rubbing across the grain, forcing the liming wax into the open grain and pores and removing any excess. Dip pad into the liming wax and then rub into the grain, with circular overlapping strokes, until the surface is evenly covered. Again wipe across the grain with a clean pad, leaving the wax in the pores. This process is to ensure the liming is worked into the open pores and grain.
After about ten minutes, remove surplus wax from the surface by gently burnishing along the grain with a dry cotton cloth. The next day, apply an overcoat of clear Classic Wax for a more durable finish.

• There are double boilers available for wax candle making. They are expensive though and unless you are intending production.
Suppliers of Materials
Beeswax can be bought in most health shops
Pure Turpentine can be bought from Artists Suppliers
Carnauba Wax can be bought from Cookery Shops
Boiled Linseed Oil can be bought from Cricket Shops
If you have difficulty obtaining any of the ingredients? Just drop me an email. questions@meditation supplies.co.uk

Moshel finds Paraffin Oil better and not so fragrant.

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe



16 comments so far

View Div's profile

Div

1653 posts in 1446 days


#1 posted 1310 days ago

Some good recipes, thanks! Now I just have to find suppliers in my part of the world…

-- Div @ the bottom end of Africa. "A woodworker's sharpest tool should be his mind."

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3025 posts in 1440 days


#2 posted 1310 days ago

Very interesting. I never thought of making my own finish.

Thanks for posting.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View mafe's profile

mafe

9243 posts in 1595 days


#3 posted 1310 days ago

Now we are getting there!
You are a wisard of wax, it was just what we needed, someone to tell us how to make our own, and without some dead animals involved…
Thank you so much Jamie, I’ll put a link on my grease box post’s if it’s ok.
Best of thoughts, and a wish that tomorrow will be a day, where the sun are even more bright, so you can enjoy that new wood…
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14418 posts in 2181 days


#4 posted 1309 days ago

Geez, this could get as bad as making lubes for black powder bullets. Basically the same ingerdients:-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View BigTiny's profile

BigTiny

1664 posts in 1394 days


#5 posted 1309 days ago

Rather than a double boiler, why not use a microwave?

-- The nicer the nice, the higher the price!

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4038 posts in 1362 days


#6 posted 1309 days ago

Pure Turpentine is flammable. So I would not use it.
A jar of wax & turpentine sat in a pot of hot water softens very quickly.

Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View rivergirl's profile

rivergirl

3198 posts in 1344 days


#7 posted 1309 days ago

Big Tiny- I would think that the microwave could be a bit dangerous due to the inability to manipulate the temperature. A double boiler provides low heat dissipated through water. Microwaves get this pretty hot, pretty quickly. You can pick up a double boiler at the infamous Walmart. You don’t need a good one for cooking say.. chocolate so one from Walmart will suffice. PS great information Alba.

-- Homer : "Oh, and how is education supposed to make me feel smarter? Besides, every time I learn something new, it pushes some old stuff out of my brain."

View John Gray's profile

John Gray

2366 posts in 2391 days


#8 posted 1309 days ago

Thanks for the post.
I’ve used a microwave to make the Furniture Preparation Oil Recipe Formula. You just have to heat in “bursts” (short micro time check and heat a little more keeping a close eye on it).

-- Only the Shadow knows....................

View swirt's profile

swirt

1914 posts in 1478 days


#9 posted 1309 days ago

Stephen Shepherd at Full Chisel Blog has some interesting info both historical and current on what to use in a tallow box, for use on tools …not sure how furniture polish is now going into grease boxes ;)

http://www.fullchisel.com/blog/?p=1167 The short version if you don’t want to read it all is that he uses simple lard from the grocery store.

-- Galootish log blog, http://www.timberframe-tools.com

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4038 posts in 1362 days


#10 posted 1308 days ago

Hi Swirt,
the furniture polish was just put in as a straight copy of what I send to my customers along with some polish.

Grease. Yes I know it well. Smelly stuff that gets as hard as ice in an unheated Scottish workshop. I personally only used Beeswax straight and I finally got to adding turpentine to it for the winter months. My grandfather thought it ingenious. He was also a carpenter & Joiner. He relates to eating his sandwiches with hands smelling of rancid fat. There were no hot water facilities to wash your hands on the ships my grandfather worked on. Hot water was reserved for tea. :)
Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View moshel's profile

moshel

864 posts in 2189 days


#11 posted 1302 days ago

i used natural bee wax with paraffin oil to soften it. less smelly than terps, and will not harden, so its really more a grease than wax.

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View Roger's profile

Roger

13076 posts in 1310 days


#12 posted 1257 days ago

How do you get all that into those itty-bitty boxes? LOL

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4038 posts in 1362 days


#13 posted 1256 days ago

LoL :)

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View meestajack's profile

meestajack

33 posts in 1177 days


#14 posted 1148 days ago

I just mixed a batch of pastewax over the weekend using a coffee can inside an old aluminum pasta pot as a double boiler…

low heat, keep an eye on it, and you should be fine.

be careful though, these ingredients can combust if they get too hot or are spilled on the heating element or flame.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2182 posts in 1389 days


#15 posted 24 days ago

the great thing about this site is discovering posts like this one. Was looking for a recipe for grease box grease and discovered your post. Thanks Jamie!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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