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Stacked Dado, or Router Bit

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Blog entry by airfieldman posted 2411 days ago 3774 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Ok, I’m new. I admit it. No shame, right? Here’s my problem…I’m building my router table (good start, eh?) and the project calls for some rabbits. Not having a stacked dado or a router bit (of any kind yet) I have to decide which route to start with. Thus far I have been managing with simply lowering my blade and making several passes. It works. Not great, not very precise, but it works.

So, for the long run, and having blown my allowance already. which should I get first? The stacked dado would be more accurate, but for the same price I could get a whole set of bits.

Suggestions?

-- Measure with a micrometer, mark with a crayon, cut it with a chainsaw.



10 comments so far

View Russel's profile

Russel

2199 posts in 2540 days


#1 posted 2411 days ago

I prefer my router table for rabbets over my dado blades. To my mind, it’s a much cleaner cut.

-- Working at Woodworking http://www.VillageLaneFurniture.com

View airfieldman's profile

airfieldman

177 posts in 2412 days


#2 posted 2411 days ago

Ok, note to self: it’s “rabbet” not “rabbit.” Check.

-- Measure with a micrometer, mark with a crayon, cut it with a chainsaw.

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1763 posts in 2591 days


#3 posted 2411 days ago

Go with a nice set of carbide router bits. You can do dado’s/rabbets with them too and they tend not to kick back as easily as a stacked blade will do. The carbide edge will last for a long time as well.

There’s another way to cut rabbets with a tablesaw…Bolt a panel to your existing saw fence, say appx 12” high and the full length of the fence. This is your jig. It is used to support tall items like panels or rails/stiles, etc. at a 90 degree angle to the blade. Now place your project panel against this and cut the rabbbet depth. Your next cut will be with the panel face down to remove this piece. Follow this cut plan for all your rabbets or tenons as cutting the face first will lessen the edge support (makes the edge thinner). I’ve also used a jig like this to cut raised panels for cabinet doors too.

I probably have confused everybody but the most seasoned LJ’s to the max by now, so I’ll try and find a link unless someone else can get it first. Be back later!

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View iSawitfirst's profile

iSawitfirst

34 posts in 2413 days


#4 posted 2411 days ago

I’m trying to decide the same thing (my cheap dado set HAS to go!). Wouldn’t it be better to go with a dado set so you can have a higher degree of width control – with shims?

-- The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance. Aristotle

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1763 posts in 2591 days


#5 posted 2411 days ago

OK guys and gals…here’s the idea in “picktures” that we can all understand!

http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip011116ws.html

Making cuts like this can be real dangerous but will be easier on your fingers if your project piece can be clamped to the jig face, and “the jig” would be allowed to slide the length of the fence. This is also how you can cut tenons or half-lap joints safely. There is an article out there…someone help me with this…I can’t remember where! But I think you’ll get the idea with this link. (OH…You’ll notice in the pic that he’s cutting on the left side of the blade…That’s because he’s cutting an angle on the raised panel.) I’m killin’ time right now, let me go see if I can find some more info.

iSawitfirst, Yes, stacked dado’s are the preferred cutter. Most of the guys here have condemmed wobble dado blades.

OK, I’m back again! Check out this tenoning jig. It rides in the table slots. Notice that your project piece is firmly clamped to the jig. Keeps your fingers attached to your hand!

http://www.bobsplans.com/FreeJigPlans/TenonJig/TenonJig.php

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1763 posts in 2591 days


#6 posted 2411 days ago

And now it’s Miller Time!

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View furnitologist's profile

furnitologist

198 posts in 2614 days


#7 posted 2411 days ago

Hey Airfieldman…....what do you mean your new, there’s always something new for everybody with this wood stuff. Just to throw this out at you, what direction are you planning on taking your woodworking? Large cabinets at first which would have you cutting sheet goods or are you headed more towards smaller projects that move you in the direction of hardwood. Which ever it is, larger go with stacked dado, small hard wood items, router and router table.
Hope that helps…...Neil

View airfieldman's profile

airfieldman

177 posts in 2412 days


#8 posted 2410 days ago

Wow…this was exactly what I needed. Thanks! I ended up going with the router bits. I figured I got more bang for my buck (more sawdust for my buck?). Plus, with the suggestions from Dadoo (Go Sox!) and furnitologist, it seemed the best route (pun intended).

I’ll let you know how the table turns out.

Cheers!

-- Measure with a micrometer, mark with a crayon, cut it with a chainsaw.

View Dadoo's profile

Dadoo

1763 posts in 2591 days


#9 posted 2410 days ago

Another cool thing about a tablesaw is that you can remove a hell of a lot of stock quickly, then take the project to the router! It cuts down on the routing time, heat generated to the bits, and wear and tear on the motor.

-- Bob Vila would be so proud of you!

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2915 days


#10 posted 2410 days ago

I spent all day fighting a router bit cut dato in a set of kitchen cabinets. My bit is 5/8 +.05” well the 5/8 melamine was 5/8+.1” this would not be an issue with the dado blades. Now you have to buy both.

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