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Charles Neil build along mahogany lowboy "series" #15: week

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Blog entry by a1Jim posted 1486 days ago 5807 reads 2 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 14: week Part 15 of Charles Neil build along mahogany lowboy "series" series Part 16: week »

Charles Neil lowboy build-along, # 15
When we left off in the last installment, we had the drawers together and we had sanded the inside and started to sand the outside. Continuing on, I used a number of different sanders to sand the outside of the drawers. I own a number of belt sanders, so to speed up the process I have three belt sanders with three different grits of sand paper to sand just the outside sides.

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I use them very carefully as a belt sander can wipe-out a project quicker than any other sanders. After light passes with the belt sanders I use my random orbital sander and sand the remaining edges and finish up the sides, using up to 180 grit. I use the same ball shape router bit to sand the concave dimple in the back of the small drawer, but now have some PSA sandpaper attached to it.

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Next comes the fitting of the drawers to the case. This involves a number of steps. The first step is that I take all the drawers and cut about 3/16 “off of the bottom of the drawer fronts with the table saw.

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This insures there’s no catching of the drawer front on the case. The next step is to check and see how level the drawers fit on the drawer shelves. In other words, when you press on any of the drawers when in place, will they tilt or bounce up and down. To adjust any bounce, you can adjust the back of the drawer shelves where they are screwed to the back of the case. If I hadn’t mentioned it earlier, the holes in the back of the drawer shelves are oversized just for the purpose of adjustment. It may also necessary to plane a little off the bottom edge of any drawer that still bounces after adjusting the back screws. The next step is to install the drawers and see how they fit in each opening. After that, you start to install the side guides in the case
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and then the wider center side guides that help tie the drawer shelves together, but still act as side guides for the drawers. After your drawers are adjusted so that they have no bounce and slide in and out without a large amount of side play , you’re ready for the next step. Now you take each drawer and put a bevel on the bottom edge just below where the drawer bottoms will slide in.

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I used a rabbiting plane because it seems to fit the area pretty well.

It’s important not to bevel the first two inches or so. After planing the bevel so they were fairly even, I sand them a little just to clean them up. Now I put them back in the case and check how flat the drawers fronts are compared to the scroll board and the rest of the front of the case and line them up so that the lowest part of the drawer fronts are even with the front of the case.
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Being very careful not to move the drawers from their alignment, I take some small blocks of wood that have been sized so their height won’t interfere with the drawer bottom and glue them on the case at the front corner of each side of the front inside corner of each drawer.

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These will serve as stops for the drawers and also keep the drawers aligned side to side. Notice the tape at the corner where each stop goes. If you glue the drawer in place, you might destroy it trying to get it out. You might guess that the bevel put on the bottoms of the drawer s were to insure there is no binding with the alignment blocks.

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This is typical of Charles’ woodworking genius and simple effect approaches to a problem of drawers that might otherwise would get jammed going in and out, no matter how much time you spend fitting them.
Now I’m ready for the next step, sanding the front of case and drawer all flush. That’s where we will start next time.
Remember, the techniques used are from Charles Neil’s subscription online webisode.
Sign up for Charles, “Mastering Woodworking” webisodes
http://mw.charlesneilwoodworking.com/ a new project starts soon so don’t miss out.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture



22 comments so far

View schloemoe's profile

schloemoe

691 posts in 1569 days


#1 posted 1486 days ago

Very detailed and very good work you would make Charles proud…......................Schloemoe..Rick

-- schloemoe, Oregon , http://www. woodrehab.blogspot.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112014 posts in 2208 days


#2 posted 1486 days ago

Thanks Rob and Rick

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View sandhill's profile

sandhill

2118 posts in 2555 days


#3 posted 1486 days ago

Great photos jim

-- Bob Egbert AKA Sandhill http://www.sandhillwoodworks.com/

View pawpawsteve's profile

pawpawsteve

16 posts in 1621 days


#4 posted 1486 days ago

Great job of building and great job of showing us how you did it. Charles picked a winner when he chose you to do the build along!

-- Steve ... determined to die working and believing that God is good!

View Jordan's profile

Jordan

1358 posts in 1756 days


#5 posted 1486 days ago

Soooo many tools! Tell me Jim, will you make more money for going the extra length for such beautiful detail – or do you make that kind of extra effort just because you love it? I mean, seriously, if a customer looked at this blog and the work involved, they would be shocked. Liked the before and after photos.

-- http://www.jordanstraker.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112014 posts in 2208 days


#6 posted 1486 days ago

Thanks Sandhill. Steve, and Jordon.
I don’t know detail the way you do Jordon , your blog on your Indian warrior shirt carving is fantastic.

If you haven’t seen Jordon’s blog gang here’s a link
http://lumberjocks.com/jordan/blog/17144

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View rsladdwoodworks's profile

rsladdwoodworks

311 posts in 1800 days


#7 posted 1486 days ago

Jordan if you take the easy way out why do it at all that is what keep a customer coming back is that ester effort love the work you do Jim it is nice to see some one do the job wright

-- Robert Laddusaw and no I am not smarter then a fifth grader ( and no I canot spell so if it is a problem don't read it ))

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112014 posts in 2208 days


#8 posted 1486 days ago

Thanks Robert

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2280 days


#9 posted 1486 days ago

This is looking fantastic Jim!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112014 posts in 2208 days


#10 posted 1486 days ago

Thanks Sharon

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View patron's profile

patron

13017 posts in 1972 days


#11 posted 1486 days ago

well done as usual , jim ,

step by step easy for us to follow .

i’m wondering ,
since you are left handed ,

do you have to read the plans in the mirror ,

like da vinci did ?

it must get confusing at times , LOL .

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112014 posts in 2208 days


#12 posted 1486 days ago

Your right nortap I mean Patron . Wow Da vinci pretty good company Huh.
Thanks David .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Jordan's profile

Jordan

1358 posts in 1756 days


#13 posted 1486 days ago

Yes Jim, it’s funny how we all have the patience for our certain niche items. I may have the patience to paint 3000 beads but I couldn’t make a square drawer if you paid me – I think the talents of my drawer making came down to trying to fix that old dresser that had the drawers on metal guides stapled to them – you know the ones that wobble back and forth?
I’m interested to see this finished and glad you are blogging it.

It’s okay Robert, I wasn’t suggesting he take the easy way out, I was only hoping that people wouldn’t balk if he sold high end and appreciated the workmanship, like I do.

-- http://www.jordanstraker.com

View Bob Kollman's profile

Bob Kollman

1796 posts in 1822 days


#14 posted 1486 days ago

Looking good Jim, kinda nice seeing all the front together.

Usually at this point in the project I start to get a little apprehensive,

Murphy’s Law you know…..LOL

-- Bob Kenosha Wi.

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

12935 posts in 1965 days


#15 posted 1486 days ago

Enjoying your great work and this blog Jim. I’m becoming less ignorant all the time following this. When I see your array of tools it makes me wish I owned and operated a tool store in your area! I would buy more tools, but unlike yourself, nobody would be willing to pay for my woodworking, so I just have to get along with what I have. Looking forward to episode 14.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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