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One Man's Junk - Chair #2: Starting the work

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Blog entry by Zuki posted 07-06-2008 02:27 AM 1074 reads 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: The inspiration and the junk Part 2 of One Man's Junk - Chair series Part 3: Using the Bandsaw »

Since my last posting I went to the local lumber yard to get some 8/4 poplar. I found a nice board that was 12” wide and had them cut off 36” . . . that made 6bf @ $3.25 bf = $19.50.

I then spent some time examining my inspiration. The seat is actually 1” thick made from several t&g boards. I opted to go with pocket screwing the boards together. Here is the blank.

I also dressed by 8/4 blank that I will use for the arms and back of the chair.

I then dug out some cardboard to make templates for the seat, arms and back of the chair.

Tomorrow I will be hitting the bandsaw to cut out the pieces. The only problem is that I have yet to use my BS since setting it up several months ago. I am a little nervous with diving right in so I will have to make some practise cuts prior to taking the plunge.

Anyone have any hints to getting these pieces cut properly?

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki



5 comments so far

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3361 days


#1 posted 07-06-2008 03:06 AM

Make sure your blade is tensioned properly. Stay a bit outside your cut line and then use a rasp to get to the line itself. Drill relief holes into the corners so you can turn your blade, or alternatively, make relief cuts into the corners.

Just curious about the seat. Are you going to scoop it out? I’m just wondering if those pocket screws will get in the way of that.

Good luck. I can’t wait to see how you rehab the chair.

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Zuki's profile

Zuki

1404 posts in 3542 days


#2 posted 07-06-2008 01:29 PM

Ahhh . . . great pointers Betsy.

The screws should not be a problem (I hope). As the seat is 1” thick I should have a little more wiggle room than if I was using 3/4” board. Before I dive into the scooping I will do a test scoop with some scrap to see how much room I have.

If I cannot go to the required depth I will consider it a ”last minute design modification” or a ”dang it I should have thoroughly thought out the pocket screw idea” and either scoop shallower for aesthetics only or go with a flat seat and add a cushion.

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki

View trifern's profile

trifern

8135 posts in 3232 days


#3 posted 07-06-2008 03:10 PM

Great blog Zuki… I will be following.

-- My favorite piece is my last one, my best piece is my next one.

View Betsy's profile

Betsy

3338 posts in 3361 days


#4 posted 07-06-2008 07:37 PM

Zuki—- I’m assuming you glued as well as pocket hole screwed. I’m wondering if you can pull out the screws while you scoop. If you discover any holes on the top of the seat while scooping you know you can’t reinsert those screws. Most, if any, holes you get from scooping should be small enough that you can use the sawdust and glue trick to fill them in. If you have any larger holes—then you have a design variation opportunity—- you can add some decorative insert pieces. Just some thoughts.

I hope this works out. I had a chair like this and really miss having it around. It was really comfortable.

Good luck!

-- "Our past judges our present." JFK - 1962; American Heritage Magazine

View Zuki's profile

Zuki

1404 posts in 3542 days


#5 posted 07-07-2008 01:32 AM

Betsy – - Nope, I did not glue them as I do not use adhesives in my woodworking. However, I do like your idea for larger holes. Hopefully I will not have to venture down that road . . . but who knows. :-)

-- BLOG - http://www.colorfulcanary.com/search/label/Zuki

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