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Blog entry by YorkshireStewart posted 1573 days ago 2795 reads 0 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here’s a couple of pictures of just a few from a box of tools that have just been donated to the museum where I do voluntary work. They’re mostly in cast brass. My thoughts were that they’re for decorative plaster work. Can anyone confirm? Any other ideas?
Tiles are 6” to give a guide as to sizes.

Mystery tools

Photobucket

-- Res severa verum gaudium - True pleasure is a serious business. http://www.folksy.com/shops/TreeGems



17 comments so far

View sphere's profile

sphere

109 posts in 1618 days


#1 posted 1573 days ago

Maybe for sculpting wax or clay?

-- Spheramid Enterprises Architectural Wood Works

View pommy's profile

pommy

1697 posts in 2278 days


#2 posted 1573 days ago

definatly for plaster work cornicing and coving i would say looking at them and know how old the buildings are around yorkshire the victorians loved their detailed coving and cornices

thats my shout anyway

Andy

-- cut it saw it scrap it SKPE: ANDREW.CARTER69

View quartrsawn's profile

quartrsawn

143 posts in 1800 days


#3 posted 1573 days ago

Hello, I think they may be foundry tools used in the wet sand molding/casting process for cast iron parts. They were used to shape the sand in the negative form of the part being cast from the molten iron.

-- Nat - West Sayville,L.I., NY

View Leslie's profile

Leslie

44 posts in 1640 days


#4 posted 1573 days ago

As a plaster contractor I would have to say they are indeed ornamental plaster tools. I have a set myself I picked up at a flea market.

-- Leslie, TX

View Leslie's profile

Leslie

44 posts in 1640 days


#5 posted 1573 days ago

Oh nowdays some use them in sand art. All so you should have one longer amd flat at the end to connect the box and cove parts too.

-- Leslie, TX

View Karson's profile

Karson

34847 posts in 2987 days


#6 posted 1573 days ago

Interesting set of tools Stewart..

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View YorkshireStewart's profile

YorkshireStewart

1106 posts in 2488 days


#7 posted 1573 days ago

Thanks folks.

Leslie I just picked up a handful quickly to bring home to photograph. There must be another twenty or so different shapes and sizes.

-- Res severa verum gaudium - True pleasure is a serious business. http://www.folksy.com/shops/TreeGems

View Leslie's profile

Leslie

44 posts in 1640 days


#8 posted 1573 days ago

That is a great set. My set steel had some old red top plaster on them it was the best finded I ever had my dad ( a lather and plaster) said he had not seen any for 30 yrs and that was about 12 yrs back. I sure do miss him.

-- Leslie, TX

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1702 days


#9 posted 1573 days ago

my gess wuold bee plastre or clay ornament
but now a days it seams to me a lot of different trades/people
use them in all shapes and sizes

a complet set wuold deffently bee nice to have in the toolbox
if you like to do everything and try everything I have a copple of
them and it´s the most weird/odd times/places I have used them

Dennis

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 2901 days


#10 posted 1572 days ago

Brass…hum. I have a few that are steel that showed up in a box of old tools. Why brass?

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2886 days


#11 posted 1572 days ago

My Guess!

They could possibly be foundry pattern makers tools. They use beeswax on the wooden pattern for rounding, & shaping corners, or fillets. They are heated first.

I took a pattern makers course in High school years ago.

I did a search, & I think I’m right.

Here’s some pictures,

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19284 posts in 2438 days


#12 posted 1571 days ago

Might be some early golf sticks Yorkie. LOL

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View stefang's profile

stefang

12424 posts in 1921 days


#13 posted 1570 days ago

It is possible that both foundry workers and plasterers used similar tools. I can see brass being useful because I think both casting sand and plaster are wet while being worked, so no rust. I have never seen tools like this before.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View YorkshireStewart's profile

YorkshireStewart

1106 posts in 2488 days


#14 posted 1570 days ago

Thanks all.

Dick and Barb – There are certainly some similarities in your picture. Thanks for that link. The double ended spoon looks identical to ‘mine’.

....thirteen minutes later - here is another website that seems to confirm that they’re for use in making foundry moulds.

-- Res severa verum gaudium - True pleasure is a serious business. http://www.folksy.com/shops/TreeGems

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2886 days


#15 posted 1570 days ago

You’re welcome Stewart,

Pattern making used woodworking a lot for making patterns

Who’d have thought that a class I took 62 years ago would come in handy for an answer on

Lumberjocks. <(;O}#

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

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