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Started Projects #1: Tablesaw Build

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Blog entry by Woodripper posted 07-31-2014 06:06 PM 1023 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Hello all and welcome! I suppose I will start by telling you a little bit about myself. I have dabbled in woodworking since I was a young (12 years old) Midwestern farm boy. My Dad had a couple tools and we would build small projects together. Well, I am now an older (32 years old) Southern city boy and am able to buy my own tools…when the wife says it is okay. Over the years I didn’t really do much with woodworking but I always wanted to do more of it. That is why I promptly turned the one car garage of our home into a wood shop. I knew what the tools were that I needed and had a basic knowledge of each one but I didn’t know what I WANTED from each tool plus I had a very limited budget. Basically I went around and bought the cheapest tool that I could find. Sometimes this was okay but mostly I learned real quickly what I would be looking at when I was able to upgrade but in the mean time I had to figure out how to make what I had work. For my first table saw I ended up buying a craftsman benchtop/contractor saw that happened to be on sale. Now this was not a bad saw and in fact it has done very well for what it is but there are a few things that I just can no longer deal with and it is on its way out the door. I did a little write up a couple years ago http://lumberjocks.com/projects/30596. With that in mind I set out to find a different table saw. I began researching saws and seeing what I could afford and what would fit in my garage with out consuming the entire space. I quickly found that I really couldn’t spare the cash for a brand new saw. I began researching older table saws and decided that I really wanted an old Craftsman table saw. I liked how sturdy they were and how that you can still find them for pretty cheap in very good condition. I started hitting Craigslist with an open mind realizing that I may find other good deals. Well, after months of searching and quite a few phone calls and emails I came across an ad that amazed me. Of course I was out of the country for work and fully expected the saw to be sold by the time I got back home. When I got home I sent off an email thinking “What the heck, why not.” The lady that was selling it responded right away and I hustled the kids into the truck and headed out. The ad was listed as an old Sears table saw for $60, from the pictures that were posted in looked to be in really good shape. When I got there I gave it a once over and turned it on. It ran but it needed a new belt and some adjustments. The lady told me it had been her fathers and they were trying to make room in their garage for a ping pong table. She also told me that she had just used it to build a pergola. I gladly paid her the $60 and loaded it in the back of the truck. When I got it home I started a little more in depth inspection and took some pictures. It is a model 113.298240.

The saw as it was when I got it home and off my truck. You can see my current table saw in the background amongst all the junk in my shop/garage.

A quick shot of the front handle. Looks pretty clean here.

Tilt handle, little dirty on this side but the handle is in one piece.

Back with the motor and belt. There is a belt guard that came with it but is pretty jacked up. Thinking of making a piece to cover the big hole up here for a possible dust collection port later on. I saw somewhere on the internet where someone did this or similar…will have to look that up.

The top that is pretty clean but is going to get some good buffing. Think the consensus was scotch brite pads and mineral oil.

Looking down at the arbor which seems to be nice and tight. No replacing this yet…yet.

A look at the whole mechanism. The plan is to pull this all out and apart to clean and apply some lube. I like the idea that I saw about using wax and graphite powder.

This belt needs to be replaced. The previous owners had locked down the guide bolt which meant that as you raise and lower the blade the motor did not follow.

Found out that this pulley that was attached to the motor’s shaft did not have a set screw or a key to hold it in place. And a better look at how ragged the belt is. Can’t wait for the link belt to replace this one. I think I will keep these pulleys as they are in good shape just need to put a set screw and key in.

And of course the most useless rip fence. Haven’t decided how I am going to replace this yet. Tossing around ideas of purchasing and/or building one.

Well, lots of work ahead and I don’t always have all the time to get things worked on. A wife, three kids and two jobs (one that makes me travel quite a bit) doesn’t leave lots of time for work in the shop but I look forward to working on this and the day that I actually get to cut some wood with this saw. Thanks to everyone that takes a look at this and any ideas are welcome, especially in the fence area. Keep in mind I am still on a tight budget. Just glad that I am able to share this with people that can understand the joy of owning a tool like this. Thanks again everyone and have a good day.

-- WoodRipper



13 comments so far

View CharlesA's profile (online now)

CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#1 posted 07-31-2014 06:13 PM

Link belt will make a huge difference. I couldn’t believe it. I did the PALS and aligned everything at same time—has been good as well. I found a shop fox classic fence on Craigslist. fences are not common on CL, but they do come up.

As for SCI, you can get CR-1 from Leecraft or Peachtree has some of their UMHW ones for 9.59 right now, I believe http://www.ptreeusa.com/edirect_072514.htm I have used the CR-1 as a template and made 5 or 6 for angled and different width dado cuts.

A good crosscut and rip thin kerf blades will make it hum.

This can be a really good saw for you.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View CharlesA's profile (online now)

CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#2 posted 07-31-2014 06:15 PM

Oh, folks have many preferences for this, but I used Boeshield RustFree and T-9 to get the top clean slick. I sometimes put some johnson wax on it for good measure, but according to the tests its not a very durable protectant.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View Woodripper's profile

Woodripper

22 posts in 1673 days


#3 posted 07-31-2014 06:26 PM

Thanks CharlesA! I completely forgot about the PALS but yes those are also in the plan. Yeah I hadn’t figured out yet if I would but inserts or attempt to make my own. I figured I had a little time to worry about that part. I am definitely keeping my eye out for any kind of deal on a fence that I will be able to convince the wife on.

-- WoodRipper

View CharlesA's profile (online now)

CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#4 posted 07-31-2014 06:28 PM

I found it much easier to make my own ZCI’s by using the CR-1 as a template instead of using the original stamped metal insert as a template.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View handsawgeek's profile (online now)

handsawgeek

172 posts in 82 days


#5 posted 07-31-2014 08:27 PM

This saw is very similar to the old Craftsman I own. Belt drive with a nice solid cast iron top. You will find this saw a joy to use. Warning: Sears online parts/service will likely not be able to provide replacement parts for this model any longer. I found that to be true with mine, when I contacted them to buy missing hardware for mounting the blade guard assembly. I was able to provide them with the exact part number straight from the owners manual, but received a ‘no longer available’ message. I attempted fashioning my own mount McGyver-style, with no success, and ended up having to abandon use of the blade guard altogether. Other’n that, it’s a great saw!

-- Ed

View CharlesA's profile (online now)

CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#6 posted 07-31-2014 08:42 PM

I went with the MJ splitter instead of the clunky splitter that came with it.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View LJRay's profile

LJRay

31 posts in 191 days


#7 posted 08-01-2014 01:53 AM

I’m also in the process of tuning up a 113 series Craftsman TS. It’s been kind of fun cleaning it up and really getting to know it inside and out. Good luck with yours!

-- Ray (Aspiring woodworking hobbyist. Advice is always welcome.)

View NormG's profile

NormG

4254 posts in 1690 days


#8 posted 08-01-2014 02:51 AM

Great deal

-- Norman

View Woodripper's profile

Woodripper

22 posts in 1673 days


#9 posted 08-01-2014 07:25 PM

Handsawgeek – to be honest I wasn’t even expecting to be able to find anything from Sears but if I can it will be a bonus. I know how important the safety equipment is on power tools but my blade guard has been off of my other saw pretty much since I have owned it. With the different jigs I have it was more inhibiting then helpful.

CharlesA – I looked into the MJ splitter but was concerned about some of the reviews I saw. I do really want a splitter so if its good I will consider it. I see what you mean about the ZCI – I may buy one just to use as a template.

LJRay – Thanks Ray. Would love to see pictures of yours.

NormG – Thanks!

-- WoodRipper

View CharlesA's profile (online now)

CharlesA

1659 posts in 484 days


#10 posted 08-01-2014 08:22 PM

The MJ splitter is a bit finicky to set up, but it is great once set up and it is no trouble with sleds and such You need something with a 113.

-- "Man is the only animal which devours his own, for I can apply no milder term to the general prey of the rich on the poor." ~Thomas Jefferson

View TheFridge's profile (online now)

TheFridge

899 posts in 172 days


#11 posted 08-01-2014 08:36 PM

Sawstop tsa-pfa and the delta t2 are in 150$ or so price range if you’re looking for one. I have the sawstop on my craftsman saw with and incra 1000hd. It does just about everything I want for 300-325$.

-- "We build our workshops. Then we enjoy the fruits of our labor by laboring for more fruits." - Me

View Woodripper's profile

Woodripper

22 posts in 1673 days


#12 posted 08-03-2014 10:35 PM

TheFridge – Where did you find a Sawstop tsa-pfa? I haven’t come across one. I have looked at the Delta t2 and I like it but haven’t found much availability on it.

CharlesA – Sweet! It is now on the list of things to get.

-- WoodRipper

View raymero's profile

raymero

2 posts in 316 days


#13 posted 09-12-2014 03:19 PM

Woodripper, I bought a TSA-PFA at the Woodworkers Emporium in Las Vegas last Monday 09/08/2014, so it stands to guess that any store selling SawStop saws will have the TSA-PFA. The one I bought has 52” rails. Paid $199.00 for it.

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