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Top 10 Do's and Don'ts for Woodworkers & Makers

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Blog entry by WoodWorkLIFE posted 04-21-2017 03:50 AM 2261 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This had been eating at me for a while, and I had to get it off my chest. I hate talking to the camera, but I hope it comes through. These are some tips about how to be a better member of the community and how to get the most enjoyment out of your shop time.

Send me an “Amen Brother” if you agree, I hope this helps eek just a little more enjoyment out of the craft/hobby.

Thanks for watching, please like and subscribe!


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Rick
Wood.Work.LIFE

-- Rick, Keep your tools sharp and your mind sharper, www.Wood-Work-LIFE.com



10 comments so far

View ocean's profile

ocean

45 posts in 555 days


#1 posted 04-21-2017 03:13 PM

Good comments. I for one have always tried to do one thing I have never tried before with each project. I had some epoch failures, but have learned from my mistake. The next time around I know what will or will not work. One thing I really know is you can’t have every cool tool out there. I for one have stopped buying tool for the sake of having that new cool tool and work with what I have. Most of all SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY. Put on those glasses, put on the ear muffs, really use a good respirator. You are right – if it feels wrong it is wrong. Try a different way.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

467 posts in 2070 days


#2 posted 04-21-2017 11:12 PM

Well said!!!

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View MinnesotaMarty's profile

MinnesotaMarty

110 posts in 940 days


#3 posted 04-21-2017 11:26 PM

Amen Brother !

Marty

-- I can see the cheese heads from here and it is great.

View Roger's profile

Roger

20871 posts in 2526 days


#4 posted 04-23-2017 12:33 PM

You’re absolutely right! Carry on. Work/Play safe. Keep a dust collector fed

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View FourOaks's profile

FourOaks

45 posts in 346 days


#5 posted 05-14-2017 01:11 PM

Amen! People are at many different levels in their skill. There are dozens of different ways to do things. And, yes, technology has opened up the door to do things different from yesteryear. Like many other industries, technology is making it easier for others to enter and enjoy woodworking without having to necessarily learn from the masters. Nothing wrong with learning from master woodworkers, but not all of us have easy access to these folks. Aspire to be a great woodworker through books, video, clubs, and the masters, but more importantly jump in with the tools you have and start doing it. The best way to learn and motivate yourself. Just be safe.

Thanks for sharing this video!

-- Stephen, Atlanta Georgia, http://www.fouroakscrafts.com

View dbeck's profile

dbeck

34 posts in 81 days


#6 posted 06-04-2017 09:16 AM

Excelllent lessons for us beginners, thanks for sharing with us. I am still getting use to the idea of making misstakes in my projects. Sometimes i miss the beauty in what i made because i can only see the flaws and like you say most the time i am the only one who knows. It seems in this craft you must be a bit anal about detail yet able to over look errors in that detail, tough to do at first. One of my very favorite things about this is learning something new all the time on every project it seems and getting to solve new challenges with tools, jigs etc

View WoodWorkLIFE's profile

WoodWorkLIFE

70 posts in 292 days


#7 posted 06-15-2017 08:32 PM



Good comments. I for one have always tried to do one thing I have never tried before with each project. I had some epoch failures, but have learned from my mistake. The next time around I know what will or will not work. One thing I really know is you can t have every cool tool out there. I for one have stopped buying tool for the sake of having that new cool tool and work with what I have. Most of all SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY. Put on those glasses, put on the ear muffs, really use a good respirator. You are right – if it feels wrong it is wrong. Try a different way.

- ocean

Easier to work with 10 fingers than 8

-- Rick, Keep your tools sharp and your mind sharper, www.Wood-Work-LIFE.com

View WoodWorkLIFE's profile

WoodWorkLIFE

70 posts in 292 days


#8 posted 06-15-2017 08:33 PM



Well said!!!

- EarlS

Thanks!

-- Rick, Keep your tools sharp and your mind sharper, www.Wood-Work-LIFE.com

View WoodWorkLIFE's profile

WoodWorkLIFE

70 posts in 292 days


#9 posted 06-15-2017 08:35 PM



Amen! People are at many different levels in their skill. There are dozens of different ways to do things. And, yes, technology has opened up the door to do things different from yesteryear. Like many other industries, technology is making it easier for others to enter and enjoy woodworking without having to necessarily learn from the masters. Nothing wrong with learning from master woodworkers, but not all of us have easy access to these folks. Aspire to be a great woodworker through books, video, clubs, and the masters, but more importantly jump in with the tools you have and start doing it. The best way to learn and motivate yourself. Just be safe.

Thanks for sharing this video!

- FourOaks

Plus what do you even accomplish throwing shade on beginners? Unless somebody is going to get hurt let them learn from their mistakes.

-- Rick, Keep your tools sharp and your mind sharper, www.Wood-Work-LIFE.com

View WoodWorkLIFE's profile

WoodWorkLIFE

70 posts in 292 days


#10 posted 06-15-2017 08:38 PM



Excelllent lessons for us beginners, thanks for sharing with us. I am still getting use to the idea of making misstakes in my projects. Sometimes i miss the beauty in what i made because i can only see the flaws and like you say most the time i am the only one who knows. It seems in this craft you must be a bit anal about detail yet able to over look errors in that detail, tough to do at first. One of my very favorite things about this is learning something new all the time on every project it seems and getting to solve new challenges with tools, jigs etc

- dbeck

For sure,

Maybe someday you’ll have a perfect project, but in my experience it doesn’t happen unless you’re not trying hard enough. Its the nature of the beast, wood doesn’t always behave.

-- Rick, Keep your tools sharp and your mind sharper, www.Wood-Work-LIFE.com

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