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Performax 16/32 Drum Sander

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Blog entry by WoodArtbyJR posted 08-23-2010 09:45 PM 3755 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Well, my show went very well this weekend so I am looking for a drum sand so I can improve the quality of my cutting boards and produce some end grain boards. I just found one on craigslist for $395 and now I need some advice. The manufacture date on the motor is ‘96 and the color of the unit is green. I am not sure when they switched to white. Other then listening/checking for bad bearings and looking at the overall condition, what else should I be looking at or for. This unit also comes with beaucoup belts (per the lister). There is also another one listed for $650 that is 6 years old. Should I spend the extra $250 or is the 14 year old unit good/decent buy? Or are both over priced. I don’t want to spend an extra $250 if I really don’t need to. HELP ME LJs.

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington



9 comments so far

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SPalm

5257 posts in 3348 days


#1 posted 08-23-2010 11:00 PM

Hey Jim, I am not too much help here, but I poked around some on the web and noticed that others with older units complained about a few things (not to be the all inclusive list, but things to maybe check):

Like you said, bearing noise and shaking.

Excessive slippage of the board on the belt (mine never slips).

Inability to easily adjust the drum for parallelism with the belt. Evidently they made this easier sometime in the evolution of the machine. Mine is a simple screw adjustment.

The vertical adjustment changed to a much easier to turn handle rather than a knob at some point.

They went from a 1 to a 1.5 hp motor at some point. (?)

I never noticed anyone talking about paint or green.
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 2431 days


#2 posted 08-24-2010 12:31 AM

Steve – I’ve just noticed that it seems that the older models are green. Maybe when Jet bought them out they switched to white (assumption on my part). Good to know about the 1 to 1.5 hp though. I will also check out the slippage thing as well.
Thanks

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

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WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 2431 days


#3 posted 08-24-2010 05:52 AM

I just learned that this unit is the older 1hp unit. I’m thinking this is not the unit I will want. Should I hold out for a 1.5 hp or is the 1 hp sufficient?

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

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JamesVavra

298 posts in 2782 days


#4 posted 08-25-2010 02:45 PM

I recently bought a 16/32 off of craigslist for about $250. The motor is dated ‘95 and it’s silver. Mine had a dead switch and the belt is nearly impossible to adjust (it’s really close to tracking perfectly, but I can’t get the last 1%). The drum was already parallel, so I have not tried that adjustment.

It turns out the switch just needed to be cleaned out really well (the contacts were full of sawdust, go figure!) and I’m living with the tracking. Also, the belt speed adjustment knob is mussing, but I plan to turn a new knob in the near future.

I’m very please with my purchase. I’d probably not spend the extra $ in your case, but I’m definitely on the hobbiest side of the scale, so your mileage might vary.

James

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WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 2431 days


#5 posted 08-25-2010 03:53 PM

All – I made the jump and bought the cheaper one. When I got to the sellers place it was like I was on the TV Show American Pickers (I love the show). He opened the bay door to the garage/barn and it was standing there. It was FILTHY with dust, dirt, cob webs and bird poop. It probably hadn’t been used in years. We plugged it in and hooked up a vacuum system hose and turned it on. It was very quiet and ran nicely. I had brought along a 3” by 24” piece of black walnut to try on it. Worked like I thought it should. He then showed me 9 unopened boxes of Performax sand paper strips for the machine that came with it. I purchased the Performax for $360. I then asked if he had anything else he was getting rid of. We then went into his wood treasure box area. I left with about 20, 1” x 2.5” x 36” Brazilizn Cherry boards and 17 peppermill blanks of various species (most coming from ncwood.com). He also has 2 racks of Bessy Clamps that I am going back to buy later. To say the least I was very pleased, and I also made a new woodworking friend. He also has a ‘50s era cast iron Delta lathe that he has brought into the 21st century electrically that he wants to sell that also has many Packard Woodworking accessories that come with it. So, any locals that might be interested PM me and I will hook you up.
I have the 16-32 in the shop and I am cleaning it up. I found a link on sawmillcreek.com that others had blogged about this older model and one person had a manual to share. The model number of the unit I got was 629002. Found out that this model was made in the mid ‘90s and very few modifications sine then, It has gone to a 1.5 hp motor, 4” dust port and ceramic belt guides is about all I am aware of at this time. This particular one has the ceramic belt guides already installed. Thank you for the comments.

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

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SPalm

5257 posts in 3348 days


#6 posted 08-25-2010 04:53 PM

Sweet!!! Good for you.
Those strips ain’t cheap either.

And wood is always good,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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WoodArtbyJR

428 posts in 2431 days


#7 posted 08-25-2010 05:14 PM

Well, I just tried cleaning the extension tables and found that the acid in the bird poop has either eaten through the thin chrome plating or it might be a 400 series cress (it’s magnetic). It isn’t alum. I cleaned up one table with 180 and then 240 on my orbital and looks much better. I didn’t buy this because it was a beauty queen, so it has a little acne scarring, big deal. The legs on the stand are weak at best so I will add a little bracing to make it more stable (sometimes I get a little carried away with stability). Can’t wait to rum my first end grain cutting board through.

-- Jim Roberts, Port Orchard Washington

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SPalm

5257 posts in 3348 days


#8 posted 08-25-2010 05:32 PM

I am sure you know, but go slow (careful) on that endgrain. The sander will burn while a planer will not. Those burns can run deep and be a bear to remove, besides ruining your sandpaper. It stinks too, not that I have ever done it :-)

It helps to get a rubber belt cleaner stick and rub it on the sandpaper while it is spinning every now and then.

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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SPalm

5257 posts in 3348 days


#9 posted 08-25-2010 05:38 PM

Oh, and make sure that the board runs flat, or you will end up with at board that is all the same thickness but has a large bow or twist to it. Try rocking the board on a flat surface first. Add pieces of tape or whatever to the bottom to stop the rocking before sanding. I have even used a sled, like you would in a planer.

This is where the V-drum sander comes in real handy. Performax is a thicknesser, the V-drum is a jointer.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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