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Wood for Woodturning

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Blog entry by Wildwood posted 05-10-2017 04:01 PM 753 reads 0 times favorited 0 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The other day or so recommended this site for person looking to buy wood to turn.

https://www.turningblanks.net/

If starting out might look at their “Education Center,” and many topics there. Do take what they say with a grade of salt! More correct info and explanations can be found various chapters of the governments Wood Handbook.

https://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/products/publications/several_pubs.php?grouping_id=100&header_id=p

Don’t always agree with what or how say things in their articles like, “Green Turning Blanks & Storage,” listed in drying article.

Wood suppliers selling wood to vendors catering to woodturners, have no idea of the moisture content of the wood they buy. Majority of vendors are up front about that! Vendors buy their wood by the pound sealed in wax regardless of species and sell by the inch.

Ninety nine percent of the time wood comes completely sealed in wax. Wood completely dipped in wax has a moisture-exclusion-effectiveness of almost 100 percent. If moisture cannot get in it cannot get out either! This effectively stops the wood drying process.

Last paragraph does address end sealing and removing wax from sides of a blank to speed up drying. Like the article says I too recommend paraffin wax as an end sealer only because its inexpensive and available at most grocery stores. Wax & wax emulsions don’t like heat and can melt, also wood shrinking may soften those products.

When they tell you to figure one inch per year for drying wood that is not true for all species. Okay for pine boards but not turning blanks. Length and thickness determine how long a blank takes to air dry. Wood completely seal in wax will have the same MC as when sealed unless wax has been compromised.

Depending upon where you live relative humidity, thickness of the wood will determine how long a roughed bowl or hollow form or spindle blank takes to dry. Rough turning will reduce up drying times due to decrease in mass!

-- Bill



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