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Handplane Restoration #30: English Wooden Chamfer Plane

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Blog entry by WayneC posted 1150 days ago 4950 reads 1 time favorited 26 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 29: Stanley #62 Part 2 - Inspection Part 30 of Handplane Restoration series Part 31: Guess I need to get back to work. »

This is a recent eBay purchase. I am posting this for Mads. He would like to make one and requested some photos. This plane is 6 inches long by 2 inches wide and the body is 2 1/2” Tall. There is a wood insert at the mouth that make the overall plane approximately 3 inches tall. The blade is 8 inches long 1 1/2 inches wide and is a little over 1/8 inch thick. The blade is marked The blade is marked J. Herring and Sons, England and has the image of a fish above the name. There is no manufacture name on the plane. There are two owner names on the plane (S. Reed and A. Barnard).

There is a block inserted in the chamfer that the blade is aligned with. The chamfer begins in 1/4 inch from each side. It appears to be 7/8’s from the bottom of the sole at it’s peak.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov



26 comments so far

View bigike's profile

bigike

4031 posts in 1923 days


#1 posted 1150 days ago

very nice it looks as though it doesn’t need any work though.

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1289 days


#2 posted 1150 days ago

I looks like this plane did not start life as a chamfer plane. That the only way I can explain the “missing” insert.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12265 posts in 2731 days


#3 posted 1150 days ago

Ike, I debated where to put it. My main purpose for posting this was to be a template for Mads to make one.

RG, it could be a remade tool.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mafe's profile

mafe

9492 posts in 1723 days


#4 posted 1150 days ago

Hi Wayne thank you!
I have seen these planes but never understood how they were put together, now I do.
RG, this I do not understand why? And what should be missing here.
The problem I can see with this type should be lack of support behind the blade as it comes out, so you need to take thin shavings and then tap the blade down as you go.
Best thoughts,
Mads And thank you again Wayne, it’s a really nice little plane you got you.

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1289 days


#5 posted 1150 days ago

The “insert” is not deep enough for an insert, if you put one in now it would interfere with the operation of the plane. Look closely at the 6th picture and you will see what I mean.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12265 posts in 2731 days


#6 posted 1150 days ago

The insert comes out about 1/8th of an inch to create a mouth for the plane. You can see it in the bottom of the v. I belive the triangle in the center of the v represents the size of the chamfer.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1327 days


#7 posted 1150 days ago

I was thinking the same thing. It seems as if it started out as a smoother and someone excavated the sole and added a block. How they did that with such precision, I’ll never know. It seems as if the block with forever prevent the sole from fully engaging the piece. Am I missing something too?

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12265 posts in 2731 days


#8 posted 1149 days ago

I believe this just takes an 1/8th of an inch chamfer off of the edge of the wood. The wooden inset is the part that goes against the cut. The V’s ride on the sides of the boards being chamfered. The blade protrudes at the back of the wooden inset. Here is a photo where you can see the blade…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1327 days


#9 posted 1149 days ago

Nice photo, Wayne, I get it now!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12265 posts in 2731 days


#10 posted 1149 days ago

Thanks. This is a pretty good view as well…

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1327 days


#11 posted 1149 days ago

So it looks like the first pass or two will be pretty agressive, but I’m not sure how you’d avoid that and still have support behind the blade. The block still looks a bit tall to me; how thick would you estimate that step? It looks like 1/8” at this magnification but that could be deceiving.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12265 posts in 2731 days


#12 posted 1149 days ago

It is about 1/8”. The mouth can be adjusted to take a very fine cut. I just raised the blade so it could be easily seen. I believe you would start with the edge being chamfered on the block and not at the toe of the plane. Otherwise you would just hit the leading edge of the block.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1289 days


#13 posted 1149 days ago

Ah it all makes sense now. That is cool.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12265 posts in 2731 days


#14 posted 1149 days ago

: ^ )

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mafe's profile

mafe

9492 posts in 1723 days


#15 posted 1149 days ago

Sence to me too.
It should be enough support.
Thank you.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

showing 1 through 15 of 26 comments

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