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Handplane Reference #7: Electronic Books.

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Blog entry by WayneC posted 05-08-2011 01:05 AM 2609 reads 11 times favorited 48 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: I found a cool book today Part 7 of Handplane Reference series Part 8: Bench Plane Screw Sizes. »

In Feburary 2011, I broke my right leg and ended up having to deal with an extend stay in the hospital and time away from work. I was given an eReader as a get well gift and have been using it to kill the time. One of the things I found is that many classic woodworking books are available in electronic format for free. Many of these come from Google Books.

You can read these books on-line using your web browser and down load them to your computer and save them there if you like. If you have an eReader, such as a Sony, Kindle, or Nook you can send the books to them and use them on your reader. This also can work on iOS devices (iPhone/iPad) and Android smartphones if you download an eBook reader application. eReader applications are available from Apple, Amazon, and Barnes and Noble as well as others.

If your adverse to technology, many of these books have been reprinted and are available on Amazon.com in hard copy. Simply go to http://Amazon.com and search for the book’s title or author. Also, I have seen a number of these books in Amazon’s Kindle store. You can see Amazon’s current list of Kindle woodworking books at the following link.

http://www.amazon.com/s/qid=1304899872/ref=sr_pg_1?ie=UTF8&bbn=156765011&rh=n%3A133140011%2Cn%3A%21133141011%2Cn%3A154606011%2Cn%3A292975011%2Cn%3A156699011%2Cn%3A156765011%2Cn%3A156821011&page=1

If your interested in discussing eReader technology let me know, I have used Various iPhone and iPad eReader applications, the Nook Color and Kindle eReaders.

I’m going to keep a running list of eBooks and links to them here. I will add to the list over time.

Individual Book Links

A manual of wood carving (1891) by Leland, Charles Godfrey and Holtzapffel, John Jacob

The art of wood carving By George Alfred Rogers

Mechanick exercises: or, The doctrine of handy-works. Applied to the arts of Handy Work By Joseph Moxon

Sloyd By Gustaf Larsson

Elementary sloyd and whittling: with drawings and working directions By Gustaf Larsson

Practical carpentry, joinery, and cabinet-making By P. Nicholson

Problems in farm woodwork, for agricultural schools, high schools, industrial schools, and country schools By Samuel A. Blackburn

Modern practical joinery By George Ellis

Turning and mechanical manipulation: Intended as a work of general ..., Volume 1 By Charles Holtzapffel

Turning and mechanical manipulation, by C. Holtzapffel By Charles Holtzapffel, John Jacob Holtzapffel

Descriptive catalogue of the woods commonly employed in this country for the ... By Charles Holtzapffel

The art of saw-filing By Henry Wells Holly

Mission Furniture: How To Make It by Henry Haven Windsor

Links to Ebook Sites

Google Books – Google book site (search for books and filter on free books). Able to download books in PDF format.

Project Gutenberg – 33,000 ebooks in many formats including ones for various eReaders.

ChestofBooks.com: Read Books Online for Free – Check out the crafts and home improvements sections for woodworking related books. The books do not appear to be downloadable.

The Evenfall Studios - Woodworks Library – 175 free woodworking related books. Most appear to be in PDF format.

Internet Archive – Lots of different media. Books in many different formats. Search for items of interest.

Do It 101 – Woodworking Section – Good selection of information. Books are HTML format.

Darkwood Woodcarving- good selection of PDF eBooks on wood carving

More coming….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov



48 comments so far

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1584 days


#1 posted 05-08-2011 01:26 AM

Wayne thanks for the links. Here are a few old ones I have found useful.
Practical carpentry, joinery, and cabinet-making [by P. Nicholson
Problems in farm woodwork, for agricultural schools, high schools, industrial schools, and country schools – Samuel A. Blackburn
Modern practical joinery – George Ellis
The last one has some really good stuff on hand planes.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#2 posted 05-08-2011 01:28 AM

Thanks Dave, I will add them to the list.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1859 days


#3 posted 05-08-2011 02:21 AM

thank´s wayne :-)

not solong ago Rivergirl had a blog about E-books and there was a lot of links in that right from start to the end of it but I can´t remember what she called the blog

I have a few links I will dig out for you tommorow , for now I had to find the bed its 0230 here

G-night :-)
Dennis

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1584 days


#4 posted 05-08-2011 03:02 AM

Have you watched Underhill’s show on Sloyd
The Woodwrights Shop Who Wrote the Book of Sloyd?
Dennis wake up dont go to bed yet.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#5 posted 05-08-2011 03:24 AM

Dave,

I’ve not seen the show. PBS here dropped Roy’s show and they had the american woodworker on. I’m not a big fan and I pretty much gave it up watching. In the last month or so, I noticed that they had Tommy Mac on and so I am recording and watching the shows again.

I just picked up a couple of sloyd knives and carving knives to play around with. I will check out the link. Thanks for Posting it.

Dennis, I wiil take a look or perhaps she will visit this post if she happens to see it.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1981 days


#6 posted 05-08-2011 12:04 PM

I’ve been collecting e-books for several years now. Real paper books and magazines are much easier to read, less effort to turn a page than to keep clicking the darn mouse, and computer monitors don’t have enough display area, but e-books are much easier to search, fit in a much smaller space, and don’t get torn or dirty. Plus anything I want to build, I just print the article. Backup’s are also important. Hard drives don’t last forever, so I have one USB 500 gig drive for e-books and woodworking videos and a copy on the computer I use with a video capture card to record TV shows.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1859 days


#7 posted 05-08-2011 02:09 PM

here is what I can dig up
the first one is little like googlebooks but great
http://chestofbooks.com/index.html

the next is a site but very interresting http://workshoppages.com/WS/Index.htm

this one I gess you already know but for the galoot´s its a good site
http://www.wkfinetools.com/

http://www.woodworkinghistory.com/

http://www.evenfallstudios.com/woodworks_library/woodworks_library.html#Understanding%20Wood

http://books.google.com/books?id=v_YDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA3&lpg=PA3&dq=woodworking+shop+garage+basement+pros+cons&source=bl&ots=swpPUqH_t2&sig=kA-zPAYcHFRFiYiUIJ2xbzFy7mI&hl=en&ei=cWs0TY77J46CsQPC3Py0BQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=7&ved=0CEgQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q&f=false

the next is some of those from the rivergirls blog I bookmarked
http://www.archive.org/stream/boxfurniturehowt00brigrich#page/n7/mode/2up

http://www.archive.org/stream/concretepotteryg00daviiala#page/n7/mode/2up

http://www.archive.org/stream/craftsmanhome00stic#page/n7/mode/2up

http://doit101.com/boycarpentry/contents.htm

http://www.archive.org/stream/furniture00singrich#page/n9/mode/2up

http://www.archive.org/stream/handmadefurnitur00glid#page/n1/mode/2up

http://chestofbooks.com/home-improvement/index.html

this an interresting booksite too
http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page

http://www.archive.org/stream/seatweaving00perriala#page/n3/mode/2up

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/27238/27238-h/27238-h.htm ... just scroll a little down and its there

http://www.archive.org/stream/upholsteringguid00mack#page/n5/mode/2up

that shuold cover what I had more or less…. LOL

good luck with the reading

Dennis

View Dave's profile

Dave

11205 posts in 1584 days


#8 posted 05-08-2011 02:11 PM

Alright Dennis that should keep me busy for at leas 2 years;)

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#9 posted 05-08-2011 06:41 PM

Thanks much for all of the content Dennis. I’ve got a bunch on a different computer I need to go through and I will get them added.

Hal, I would agree with you related to reading eBooks on a computer, not something I would do for an extended period of time or for enjoyment. I was not a big fan of the dedicated eReaders until I got one. I had installed some of the reading software on my iPhone and played with it as well as on the Family’s iPad and became interested.

Before Christmas I purchased a Nook Color at Best Buy. I chose it over an Amazon Kindle because of touch screen user interface. I felt that it would be frustrating not to be able to touch the screen and interact with the device. I have found the nook color to be a great reader. Color and the touch screen are nice. The down sides of it are similar to the iPad, iPhone and other color touch screen devices. They are hard to read in direct sunlight and battery life is limited to 8-9 hours which is really not long enough if your traveling on an airplane and do not have access to a power source.

As I said above, I was injured in Feburary (damn Texas ice storm) on a business trip and while in the hospital I recieved a Kindle as a gift. The kindle has a keyboard and buttons used to control the device. I found that my concerns about not being able to touch the screen were not really an issue. To contrast the Kindle to the Nook Color, iPad, etc. the Kindle has a simulated paper display. It is easy to read in sunlight and the battery life is close to 30 days if you turn the radio off. I also think there is less eye strain on the Kindle compared to active display devices. If you want to read in bed, you will need a light source such as a book reading light or a case with a light build in because the display is passive and emits no light. Since I got the Kindle, I have easily read 25 or more books and can say that it is a very good experience. The other interesting thing about content from Amazon and Barnes and Noble, is they have applications for PCs, Macs and mobile devices that allow you to read your content on any of these devices. I can get to my copy of “the bandsaw book” on my phone if I need to. Pretty cool.

I would really recommend the Kindle if someone was interested in getting a reader. I would recommend the Nook Color if your use is mainly in the house and you feel color is important. Nook Color is also great if you have small children. They have lots of content designed for Kids.

Yesterday I was on amazon looking for a link to “The Bandsaw Book” by Lonnie Bird to include in a post and I noticed they now have it in Kindle format. I also noticed that they had quite a few more woodworking books available. I was surprised, perhaps all the time I have spend clicking the I want that in Kindle format has paid off. One advantage of the eReaders in general is that you can have thousands of books on the device and they are easy to carry around. You can quickly find books. Much easier than having to find it in a box or large collection of books. I really love physical books but find the convience of having them with you and not taking up space to be a compelling argument for the eReaders.

With the eBooks you see in this post many of them can be downloaded to your eReader using a USB cable or in the case of the Kindle you can email the PDF file to your device.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1859 days


#10 posted 05-08-2011 10:48 PM

S-Dav :
great then I have a chance to get infront of you when it comes to refurb tools ….. LOL

Wayne :
I agree with you that real books is the best to read in I can do it alot faster than on any screen
and I just love the waight of the book and the excidement it is to reveal a new site in it for the first time
I´m the oldfasion guy who wants real catalogs to go thruogh and drool all over the pictures ha ha ha
I have only read books on the Pc and a half one on the I-pad sice we have that one in the Taxi
to get the mail thruogh to us
the I-pad is a great little tool to have in the car for mails and the news but you have to find a place with shadow to use it when the sun shine and the battery capacity is a little low if the screen is on fulltime
one feature I do love is the way I can make the text bigger and smaller just by using two fingers :-)
then I don´t have to find my reading glasses all the time

take care
Dennis

View mafe's profile

mafe

9668 posts in 1833 days


#11 posted 05-08-2011 11:35 PM

That is way too cool!
Even I do have an e-reader in my bookcase ironically that I have never used. This might bring it to life soon.
Best thoughts and thank you,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#12 posted 05-09-2011 01:22 AM

Too bad that your eReader has never been used Mads, what kind of eReader is it? I’m getting to where mine is going with me pretty much every where I go.

I started adding some of the books above. I think I will create two lists. One is sites where you can get eBooks and another that lists specific books. Check back every once in a while.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mafe's profile

mafe

9668 posts in 1833 days


#13 posted 05-09-2011 01:41 AM

I bring my netbook when ever I go to on tour (Samsung), and always read books on this one in the aroplane, bus and so. My mobile is a Android so even there I can read pdf files also, but really my netbook is my life line.
It’s a kindle, my X wife got it as a present from her work and offered it to me.
Perhaps I should try and undust it, it is really light and small, and now that I can read tool books in my garden then!
Big smile,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#14 posted 05-09-2011 01:53 AM

So your pretty well setup. I would definately dust of the Kindle. You can also download the Kindle application on your phone and computer and access your library on all 3. I see they have Krenov’s “A Cabinetmaker’s Notebook” in Kindle format. That would be a great garden read.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2842 days


#15 posted 05-09-2011 06:00 AM

Added some more books….

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

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