LumberJocks

Stanley 45 box #6: Reinforcing Mitred Corners

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Mitch Peacock posted 10-13-2015 12:58 PM 1283 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Glue-up (or 'A Box of Stress') Part 6 of Stanley 45 box series Part 7: Flushing off the Reinforcements »

Plain mitred corners are inherently weak, due to the propensity of end grain to end grain in the joint. For a box like this, I feel it is crucial to add some reinforcement.

Now you may ask, why then did I choose to plain mitre the corners? Wouldn’t I have been better using box joints, or dovetails, or adding a spline to the mitre? My answer is simply, I wanted a mitred box that was relatively easy for anyone to copy, and which had subtle decorative features.

My methods for reinforcement were to insert veneer keys, and through dowels. Either method being adequate, but both being a nice pleasing combination, in my view.

Thin strips of oak were prepared using the band saw, and then planed to a slip fit in a saw kerf. Then saw kerfs were cut across each mitred corner of the box, and the strips glued in. Remembering to run the long grain perpendicular to the joint line.

Next I drilled holes for 2mm dowels (hardwood cocktail sticks)...

...cut the dowels over size, applied glue and knocked them home.

The box was then left for a day, to allow a full cure to occur.

-- Design, Build, Inspire. http://www.WOmadeOD.co.uk



4 comments so far

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2801 days


#1 posted 10-18-2015 08:55 PM

There is nothing wrong about reinforcing miters but they are stronger with just glue than many think. While there is a lot of end grain, there is also some side grain involved, so they are stronger joints than they get credit for. A keepsake box usually doesn’t require reinforcement if the joints are tight, but for boxes with heavier loads or where it will be roughly handles it is wise to reinforce.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

23200 posts in 2333 days


#2 posted 10-18-2015 09:05 PM

If the corners are cut well they certainly have some strength. However, the splines add a lot more strength and are attractive as well. Most people like the looks of splines and I think it’s best to put them in or even go with hidden splines. The exposed splines are easy enough to do and fast enough so I just put them in. I think that they add some character to boxes as well. I have never dropped a box but without splines I would worry that a dropped box could bust a corner joint. Since splines are attractive and add strength why not use them.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Mitch Peacock's profile

Mitch Peacock

65 posts in 1201 days


#3 posted 10-19-2015 06:59 PM



for boxes with heavier loads or where it will be roughly handles it is wise to reinforce.

I think it would be classed as such, and the reinforcement also works here as a design detail.

You are correct of course, that not all applications would require reinforcement, and I appreciate your pointing that out. I wouldn’t want to put anyone off making a light duty box by thinking they need to do any more than cut the mitres.

-- Design, Build, Inspire. http://www.WOmadeOD.co.uk

View Mitch Peacock's profile

Mitch Peacock

65 posts in 1201 days


#4 posted 10-19-2015 07:01 PM



If the corners are cut well they certainly have some strength. However, the splines add a lot more strength and are attractive as well. Most people like the looks of splines and I think it s best to put them in or even go with hidden splines. The exposed splines are easy enough to do and fast enough so I just put them in. I think that they add some character to boxes as well. I have never dropped a box but without splines I would worry that a dropped box could bust a corner joint. Since splines are attractive and add strength why not use them.

Thanks, we are clearly on a similar wavelength with this one.

-- Design, Build, Inspire. http://www.WOmadeOD.co.uk

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com