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Thickness Drum Sander #2: Design and Planning

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Blog entry by Vip3r74 posted 394 days ago 1433 reads 1 time favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Design and Planning Part 2 of Thickness Drum Sander series Part 3: Tables and Lifting Mechanism »

I think one of the important things about a drumsander is stability, meaning as little vibration as possible in all aspects of the machine. It is a finishing tool after all, and that is why I’m spending a lot of time in designing this machine to ensure minimum unnecessary vibration an movement while the machine is working. I have only seen 3 drumsander so far and they were all rigid, solid machines.

But enough of that, the frame for my sander is made up from 2” square tubing as well as some 2” angle iron. It will be mounted on a wooden base plate with some bolts.

This is framework v1, v2 looks a bit different due to changes in the table lifting mechanism but I will cover that at a later stage.

I’m using a 1” shaft with 2 pillarblock bearings that is mounted a bit more to the infeed side so that the table on the outfeed side is a bit longer to support longer jobs better.

The motor baseplate will be mounted on a hinge on the backside frame and will adjust the V-belt tension with a bolt frame the main baseplate.

Okay that is what I have time for today, will continue tomorrow.

Thanks for watching and the advice, I appreciate all criticism and advice.

-- Create, create, create create. It makes my blood flow. And what better material to use than wood, you can repeat the same object 1000 times and none will look the same in natural form.



6 comments so far

View Bogeyguy's profile

Bogeyguy

464 posts in 693 days


#1 posted 393 days ago

A nice concept plan Vip. Just remember to use it as a sander. Lots of folks think these drum sanders are a cheap substitute for a planer. Not so.

-- Art, Pittsburgh.

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4783 posts in 2507 days


#2 posted 393 days ago

Looking good.
But just a thought, I don’t see vibration as a problem at all. I see flex and adjustment as the problems. Make sure that the platform below the drum is strong and quickly adjustable.

This will be fun to watch.
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View Vip3r74's profile

Vip3r74

65 posts in 434 days


#3 posted 393 days ago

Bogeyguy: I have already seen the difference between sanding and planing, the couch in my projects tought me that lesson. It was really dirty pine that I wanted to clean up and I used about 5×40 grit belts on my belt sander with only a 4” x 8” area clean when I realized that I was fighting a losing battle. I sent them to a friend of mine with a planer and he cleaned them up for me without any hassles. So trust me, lesson learned. Thanks for the advise. :-)

Steve: Keep watching, I would like your comment on the table adjustment system. You seem to know something I don’t. :-)

-- Create, create, create create. It makes my blood flow. And what better material to use than wood, you can repeat the same object 1000 times and none will look the same in natural form.

View lew's profile

lew

9991 posts in 2380 days


#4 posted 393 days ago

I agree with Steve about the adjustments. Make sure the table adjustment stabilizes the entire width of the table and on the pivot end of the table, provide some method of adjustment to keep the table surface parallel with the drum.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Loren's profile

Loren

7389 posts in 2273 days


#5 posted 393 days ago

If you’re planning to hand feed you’ll find it tedious –
extremely tedious.

Some people have cannibalized treadmills for the
variable speed conveyer mechanicals.

I have a Woodmaster with planer type rubber
feed rollers on top. For longer parts this works
better than the conveyer on my Performax drum
sander, which is a pita but great for small and
thin parts.

Get at least a 2hp motor. 3-5 hp is better.

Considering the tedium of hand-feeding or inventing
a feedworks for a drum sander, building a stroke
sander might be a better investment of your time
and engineering skills.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Vip3r74's profile

Vip3r74

65 posts in 434 days


#6 posted 392 days ago

Thanks Lew, in part 3 I will discuss the tables. Please have a look and comment or criticize.

Thanks Loren, initial planning so far is for handfeed, that is because of my lifting system. I’m still working on a different lifting system that is stable and the possibility of a feed system. I do have a small 12v motor with power supply that is perfect for that application. I did not know what a stroke sander is but after googling it I now know, not really what I’m looking for.

-- Create, create, create create. It makes my blood flow. And what better material to use than wood, you can repeat the same object 1000 times and none will look the same in natural form.

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