LumberJocks

Lessons... #1: Inheriting Tools

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by Jim posted 1954 days ago 1839 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Lessons... series Part 2: Inheriting Tools #2 »

I recently went digging through my late Grandfather’s garage and found a practically new Craftsman 1 1/2hp router with the box, but no instructions. I decided to buy a small router table at a local box store knowing it wasn’t anything great but just something to try my hand at for the time being. I finally got around to using it today. I’m finally finishing the cabinet doors I’ve been putting off for months, and decided to route the dadoes using the table. For some reason though I’m finding I know less about using routers than I thought. I figured out how to install it into the table, put the straight bit in, and raise and lower the bit by turning the “dial wheel” on the motor base. The problem I’m running into, is that after I get to a certain depth, the whole collar and bit drop a bit. Unfortunately for me, it’s right at the depth I need to lock it in at to make these dadoes. I’ve looked online, and the instruction book for this router is no longer available, always my luck. Oh well, if I can’t figure it out soon, back to the table saw I guess.

-- -- Jim - Kokomo, Indiana



13 comments so far

View jlsmith5963's profile

jlsmith5963

297 posts in 1980 days


#1 posted 1954 days ago

maybe you can find a copy of the manual for the router here

http://www.managemyhome.com/mmh/products/ManualSearchDisplay.action?psid=54055006&sid=PaidSearchxGooglexManuals

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2878 days


#2 posted 1954 days ago

or try a car jack router raiser. the scissor type jack under the router works great. Look in my gallery for the idea.

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View Jim's profile

Jim

142 posts in 1954 days


#3 posted 1954 days ago

Thanks for the link JL but unfortunately mine wasn’t available on there. And I’d wondered the other day when I saw an article in a magazine about a router life what the purpose might be, and I guess now I know haha. Thanks for the advice guys!

-- -- Jim - Kokomo, Indiana

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1809 posts in 2355 days


#4 posted 1954 days ago

Jim,
What model number router do you have?

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View Jim's profile

Jim

142 posts in 1954 days


#5 posted 1954 days ago

Craftsman 91743

-- -- Jim - Kokomo, Indiana

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1850 posts in 2193 days


#6 posted 1953 days ago

Jim,
I have an old Craftsman 1 1/2 HP (model 315.17431) that may have the same depth adjustment design. On mine the motor housing is plastic and it slides into a cast aluminum base. The bottom of the motor housing has molded threads and a threaded plastic ring is used to adjust the motor housing up and down in the aluminum base. The aluminium base is split with a thumbscrew. The thumbscrew is loosened to allow the depth to be adjusted and tightened to hold the adjustment in place.

When the router is “upside down” while mounted in a table, and the adjustment ring is rotated (to lower the bit height) the motor will not exactly follow the adjustment because of friction between the motor housing and the base. The solution is to come up to the bit height from the other direction – i.e. set the height way low, and turn the ring to raise the height. That way the ring is forcing the motor housing to move rather than gravity.

Since the unit is old, it might help to remove the base and spray the motor housing with some silicone spray or equiv. to allow it to slide easier. If you do this make sure you don’t get the spray on any wood that you intend to finish.

I hope I haven’t confused you unnecessarily.

-- Joe

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1809 posts in 2355 days


#7 posted 1953 days ago

Jim,

Are you sure of the model #? In most cases Craftsman Model numbers are three digits then a . and the five digits: XXX.XXXXX

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View Jim's profile

Jim

142 posts in 1954 days


#8 posted 1953 days ago

Sorry, I just glanced at the box number, didnt pull the router out of the table to look at the sticker. The setup that Ajosephg mentioned sounds dead on to what mine is. Just went and pulled it out to check, it IS a 315.17431)

From what Ajosephg mentioned though, I had the right idea from trial and error. The one problem though is that tightening screw just happens to go into a hole in the plastic housing at the exact depth I need, but it’s not an exact sized hole, it’s long and lets the screw slide up or down. As for starting backwards and turning it to raise, unless I’m reading it wrong and not seeing the solution, I am not able to raise it. The plastic ring that you turn moves against the base when you lower the bit, causing the motor to lower, as it should. But when you turn it the opposite direction, it just lets the ring turn on it’s own, there’s nothing holding it to the motor to take it with the ring. I hope I’m not the one getting too confusing now. Maybe I should just bite the bullet and make the grooves on the table saw already haha.

-- -- Jim - Kokomo, Indiana

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1850 posts in 2193 days


#9 posted 1953 days ago

Jim
I have a few things that I must do first, but after that I’ll go to my shop (an hour or so) and we’ll try to figure out what’s happening.

-- Joe

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1850 posts in 2193 days


#10 posted 1953 days ago

OK Jim
I’m in the shop, and here is what I see.
What I think you are calling a tightening screw is not. It is a set screw that keeps the base from turning relative to the motor, and keeps the base from falling.

The tightening mechanism is a thumb screw that screws onto a square headed bolt. This is on the outside of the cast aluminum base and no way does it touch the plastic motor housing.

When the router is mounted in a router table, and the red plastic adjusting ring is turned CCW the base is forced to rise thereby reducing the depth of cut. If the ring is turned CW the base lowers (by gravity) increasing the depth of cut. To accurately sneak up on the desired depth of cut, lower the base then turn the plastic ring CCW to reach the desired depth.

-- Joe

View Jim's profile

Jim

142 posts in 1954 days


#11 posted 1953 days ago

OK lol. I think I’ve finally realized the problem. I wasn’t on the same page as you :) but now I see what you’re saying. And yes, I was talking about the wrong screw. I was actually doing what you were suggesting, but what was missing was tightening that thumb screw. I think now that I realize I need to adjust that, I can fix this problem… hopefully ha. Thanks for all the help and tips!

-- -- Jim - Kokomo, Indiana

View ajosephg's profile

ajosephg

1850 posts in 2193 days


#12 posted 1953 days ago

Great -
Just to clarify one thiing – that set screw is not intended to lock the adjustment. Its only mission is to keep the base from rotating and/or falling off. Therefore don’t tighten it down or you’ll probably crack the motor housing.

If you want a copy of the instruction manual, send me a PM with your email, and I’ll get to it tommorrow.

-- Joe

View Jim's profile

Jim

142 posts in 1954 days


#13 posted 1953 days ago

Awesome, I think I’m good for now. Can’t believe I never realized that there was that thumbscrew on the back… I just went out and tinkered with it, did a test cut, and it did exactly what I wanted on the first try (well, it dropped down halfway through the stock but that was just a dumb error on my part, 2nd run worked just as planned!) Can’t thank you enough, you saved me from shelling out $35 for a scissor lift!

-- -- Jim - Kokomo, Indiana

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase