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Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair #26: Shaping and Sanding

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 12-02-2018 04:17 AM 755 reads 1 time favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 25: Crest Rail Final Shaping Part 26 of Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair series no next part

It’s been a while since I posted an update on this project, largely because I spent most of the summer shaping and sanding. Pretty boring stuff but I thought I’d post a few progress pictures anyhow.

The top of the rear legs on the original chairs is quite heavily rounded. To approximate this look, I lay out the shape on the leg with a white pencil. I mark the centerline of the leg as well as the curve on both sides so I have a reference line to work to.

The round over is shaped with various floats and progressively finer rasps.

Completed batch.

The bottom of the legs are shaped as well, but just a slight round over.

The bottoms of the rails and most other parts get rounded over and softened as well. The original G&G pieces all have a ‘worn soft’ shape that is subtle but really helps complete the look. It’s also time consuming to reproduce.

Cleaning up the bandsaw marks on the tapered slot in the center back splat proved to be a challenge. Luckily I had a very thin file that fit at the narrowest point.

The rest of the parts were shaped similarly, using spokeshaves, rasps and files. Figuring out how to hold these parts was half the challenge. My old benchtop Workmate with a Kreg self adjusting clamp was a big help.

Before and after shaping and sanding the back splats.

After that just a lot of boring sanding. I went through quite a few disks on the ROS sanding these parts.

A very large pile of parts, almost ready for assembly.

Next step: cut the pockets for the ebony splines in the center back splats.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



12 comments so far

View jbay's profile

jbay

2891 posts in 1102 days


#1 posted 12-02-2018 04:22 AM

Good lookin work Tung!
Great job on keeping everything consistent.
Looking forward to the next…...

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1059 posts in 698 days


#2 posted 12-02-2018 01:03 PM

Thanks jbay!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

1939 posts in 2551 days


#3 posted 12-02-2018 01:33 PM

I was just re-reading your previous entries for my G&G fix for the week. I can only imagine how many hours you have into sanding and shaping everything. My sand paper stack would be about 10x bigger since I get impatient and pull the paper off before it is worn down.

I think you might have to invest in a new ROS after this. If so, take a look at the Mirka Deros. I switched over to one after I started getting carpal tunnel pain and numbness in my hands from my Dewalt ROS sander which really helped. It’s expensive, but a lot less costly than surgery.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View sras's profile

sras

4943 posts in 3332 days


#4 posted 12-02-2018 03:44 PM

All that time on the details will be worth it – this is a first class project!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1059 posts in 698 days


#5 posted 12-02-2018 04:43 PM



I was just re-reading your previous entries for my G&G fix for the week. I can only imagine how many hours you have into sanding and shaping everything. My sand paper stack would be about 10x bigger since I get impatient and pull the paper off before it is worn down.

I think you might have to invest in a new ROS after this. If so, take a look at the Mirka Deros. I switched over to one after I started getting carpal tunnel pain and numbness in my hands from my Dewalt ROS sander which really helped. It s expensive, but a lot less costly than surgery.

- EarlS


Too many hours sanding, I can tell you that. Feels like I spent the entire summer sanding. That was only half of the stack, I threw the other stack away earlier in the summer. Even with my air cleaner running, my entire shop was covered with a film of fine dust after imwas done sanding.

Interesting side note- I had a box of Makita disks and a box of the Indasia Rhynogrip disks. The Indasia disks lasted probably 3x longer than the Makita disks before I needed to toss them.

The Mirka is a really nice sander for sure, but my Bosch sanders are relatively new. They are actually pretty decent tools, very little vibration especially from the bigger one. I work on a piece of carpet padding as well,which helps absorb some of the vibration.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1059 posts in 698 days


#6 posted 12-02-2018 04:48 PM



All that time on the details will be worth it – this is a first class project!

- sras


Agreed, the details are what make these pieces special. The splines in the back splats are next on my to-do list and are a perfect example. When I studied the originals on the chair at the Huntington I was amazed at the amount of detail work in each one. Mind boggling.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

1939 posts in 2551 days


#7 posted 12-02-2018 05:34 PM

More info on the white(?) dots. Are they pins?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1059 posts in 698 days


#8 posted 12-02-2018 05:48 PM



More info on the white(?) dots. Are they pins?

- EarlS


Yes, they are silver rods used as through pins.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View grace123's profile

grace123

251 posts in 2965 days


#9 posted 12-02-2018 07:32 PM

I am inspired to try a Greene and Greene project again. Your work is outstanding.

View pottz's profile

pottz

3576 posts in 1187 days


#10 posted 12-03-2018 06:13 PM

wow im tiered just looking at these pics buddy,all that shaping and sanding.your work always inspires me,your a true craftsman,great job as always.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1059 posts in 698 days


#11 posted 12-03-2018 08:47 PM



I am inspired to try a Greene and Greene project again. Your work is outstanding.

- grace123


Thanks Grace!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1059 posts in 698 days


#12 posted 12-03-2018 08:48 PM



wow im tiered just looking at these pics buddy,all that shaping and sanding.your work always inspires me,your a true craftsman,great job as always.

- pottz


Thanks pottz!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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