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Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair #10: CAD Templates and Pattern Sanding Test

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 11-25-2017 03:59 AM 5365 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 9: Pattern Sander Setup and Bandsaw Upgrade Part 10 of Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair series Part 11: A Lumber Mill Run »

With the new bandsaw tuned up and cutting nicely I got to work designing the templates needed to make the chairs. I worked through the steps to make each part, designing pattern routing/sanding templates to aid each step. Each part has several templates to be used to route the shape, mortises, etc.

I ended up with 46 templates overall, a lot more than I expected. I sent the files off to the local CNC shop for quoting.

While waiting for my templates I decided to test out my pattern sanding rub collar using a template for the back seat rail.

Starting with a sapele scrap, I traced a portion of the full size pattern and headed to the bandsaw.

After rough cutting just outside the line, I attached the template to the part with double sided tape. The rub collar requires an offset of 1/4”, which I designed into each CNC template. For this test, I just used the full size template and set it back about 1/4”. After a little time at the sander, I had a finished part that matched the template exactly.

Satisfied that my pattern sanding technique will work, I placed an order for a load of quarter sawn Sapele. Working in AutoCAD, I determined that I could get all of the components for a chair from a single 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9” wide and 10’ long. This required a special order from my hardwood supplier, who agreed to bring in some wood for me to pick through.

Next Steps: Pick up the sapele when it arrives and get my CNC templates on order.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



11 comments so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

601 posts in 2183 days


#1 posted 11-25-2017 01:53 PM

Wow, that is a lot of templates. What drafting program are you using?

Finding a local lumber supplier like you have has been my biggest problem. The local sawmills have domestics only and that is limited to cherry, walnut, maple, oak, poplar, etc. Any online order has ~$200 shipping costs since the wood ships via truck.

I’m starting chairs for the various desks I built, but the plans I bought from Fine Wood Working (Kevin Rodel chair) don’t appear to be all that involved. After seeing your post here, I just hope I’m not naively assuming they will be fairly easy to build.

I’m definitely going to “borrow” your sanding technique for the curved portions of the chairs.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

1694 posts in 1057 days


#2 posted 11-25-2017 03:57 PM

Are you using a “basic” spindle sander and gauging progress by eye?

I’ve had good luck with the “robo sander” drums, basically the same thing as an end bearing guided (template) router bit, but with the sanding drum instead of carbide. It works excellently, but I’ve only done edges (1”), nothing like your wider surfaces.

I’m not that familiar with spindle sanders, is there a way to add a router style guide bushing to the table much like a router?

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

744 posts in 330 days


#3 posted 11-25-2017 07:36 PM

Earl- I’m using AutoCAD for my 2d drafting. I am familiar with the Rodel chair you are building. Luckily for you it is less involved (less curves as I recall). It’s a very nice chair and was on my short list of designs to build. That Leigh FMT will come in handy when you get to building them! Have you checked woodfinder.net to find a source of lumber near you?

Splinter- I am using a jet oscillating spindle sander. I turned a custom rub collar on the lathe from UHMW-PE to press into the existing table plate on the sander. Since the spindle oscillates up and down, I had to create an oversized rub collar for the template to ride against but still allow the sanding drum to pass through. All of my templates are offset by 1/4” to account for the oversized rub collar. There are some photos in an earlier blog post.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1519 posts in 3393 days


#4 posted 11-26-2017 04:26 PM

With your investment in this process, I would think you’d be justified to get an X-Carve and make the templates yourself, especially for the price point of 46 templates.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

744 posts in 330 days


#5 posted 11-26-2017 09:50 PM



With your investment in this process, I would think you d be justified to get an X-Carve and make the templates yourself, especially for the price point of 46 templates.

- CaptainSkully


If I had room for a CNC I might consider it, but the templates will likely cost $500-600 at most so no real cost justification. Plus, no learning curve if I outsource it.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

601 posts in 2183 days


#6 posted 11-27-2017 06:00 PM

Tung – I was not aware of woodfinder.net. Thanks for the information. I think the Kevin Rodel chair will be plenty challenging for me, but nothing like the scale of work and learning curve you have with the G&G chairs.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5459 posts in 2648 days


#7 posted 11-28-2017 12:08 AM

I m starting chairs for the various desks I built, but the plans I bought from Fine Wood Working (Kevin Rodel chair) don t appear to be all that involved. After seeing your post here, I just hope I m not naively assuming they will be fairly easy to build.

- EarlS

Only next to a Greene and Greene chair does the Rodel chair seem not too involved :)

I’d be interested what the quote is for templates at a CNC shop. Pretty reasonable I would bet, so long as your program is compatible with theirs.

Great stuff.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

744 posts in 330 days


#8 posted 11-28-2017 03:04 AM



I d be interested what the quote is for templates at a CNC shop. Pretty reasonable I would bet, so long as your program is compatible with theirs.

Great stuff.

- pintodeluxe


I expect you are right. They had no trouble working from the AutoCAD files I supplied last time for the table. I imagine this will be the same.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View PPK's profile

PPK

867 posts in 644 days


#9 posted 11-28-2017 03:21 PM

I like watching your processes!
I’ve got a table (perhaps TWO) and set of dining room chairs in my future… so this is really fun to watch and learn.

-- Pete

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5659 posts in 2982 days


#10 posted 12-01-2017 10:22 PM

Man that’s a lot of templates…............!

Looking forward to seeing them in action!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

744 posts in 330 days


#11 posted 12-01-2017 11:31 PM


I d be interested what the quote is for templates at a CNC shop. Pretty reasonable I would bet, so long as your program is compatible with theirs.

Great stuff.

- pintodeluxe


Just got the quote back. $345 for the lot in 1/2” MDF. Hard to justify a new CNC at that price.

And love the Rush lyrics in you sig, Freewill is one of my favorite Rush songs. I think I might have gone with ‘and the trees will all get equal by hatchet, axe and saw’ myself

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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