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Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair #3: Marc Adams School, Day 2

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 10-11-2017 01:41 AM 703 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Marc Adams School, Day 1 Part 3 of Greene & Greene Gamble House Side Chair series Part 4: Marc Adams School, Day 3 »

Today we continued to work on the components for the back leg assembly. After tracing the outline of the components on the sapele using the templates, I roughed out the parts on the bandsaw. There is a significant amount of bandsaw work just in the parts for the back assembly alone.

The crest rail is the most time consuming part to make. The mortises for the floating tenons were made first using the multi-router, while the part was still square. Next, I affixed the template to the blank with double sided tape. Using a Forstner bit, I bored holes where there was an inside radius. After the holes were bored through, I cut the curves for the front and back of the piece on the bandsaw, then taped the offcuts back in place to bandsaw the profile.

The back apron also has a profile which I roughed out on the bandsaw as well. Even in the rough bandsawn state, the parts are starting to take shape nicely.

I began smoothing the parts with a spokeshave and block plane before moving on to final cleanup using my ROS.

Tomorrow we will continue getting the back leg components fabricated and ready for assembly.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



5 comments so far

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

598 posts in 2182 days


#1 posted 10-11-2017 12:10 PM

That is a considerable amount of work to complete just one piece of the chair. Still, it helps to see the steps of the process for future reference and not having to figure out the sequence on your own. Very timely blog for me to read since I will be making chairs for my desks later this winter. I can see that the plans will need to be fully developed before starting to reduce the chance of making major mistakes.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View pottz's profile

pottz

2216 posts in 818 days


#2 posted 10-11-2017 03:10 PM

yeah i think when people look at a g&g piece of furniture for the first time they dont realize how much work goes into it.it looks like it would be simple but far from it,but very enjoyable to make.i definitly want to do more in the future.wish i was there with ya tung.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5658 posts in 2981 days


#3 posted 10-11-2017 09:11 PM

I wonder what Peter and John Hall would think of the way their chairs are fabricated these days?

Anyone got a DeLorean we could use to bring them here….......?!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View pottz's profile

pottz

2216 posts in 818 days


#4 posted 10-11-2017 11:15 PM



I wonder what Peter and John Hall would think of the way their chairs are fabricated these days?

Anyone got a DeLorean we could use to bring them here….......?!

- Mean_Dean


i think they would love to see what modern tools and materials have done for there furniture.i think if they had todays tools they would have used used them,although probably still incorparating some hand tool use.look at what they accomplished with what they had,and think about what they could do today.who wouldnt ?.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

740 posts in 328 days


#5 posted 10-12-2017 01:05 AM



I wonder what Peter and John Hall would think of the way their chairs are fabricated these days?

- Mean_Dean


Bob Lang gave us a very interesting slide show of various Greene & Greene furniture pieces at lunch today. While complex enough, the chair we are building is actually a simplified version of the original. One of the biggest differences is in the crest rail, which actually curves in a third dimension (towards the back) and tapers in thickness (thicker at the bottom, thinner at the top. Bob thinks the originals were carved from 16/4 material in order to achieve the backwards curve. Amazing craftsmanship came out of the Halls shop. It doesn’t hurt that they were working T&M for the richest people in the country either, I suppose.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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