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Dining table inspired by the Greene & Greene Thorsen table #22: ID Pins and Setting Up the "Spray Booth"

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 08-30-2017 01:41 AM 4090 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 21: Fitting Ebony Splines and Plugs Part 22 of Dining table inspired by the Greene & Greene Thorsen table series Part 23: Testing Finish Options »

The last step before finishing is to add the identification pins to the leaves. The pins are made from brass rod stock turned on the lathe. After truing up one end, I cut them off roughly 1/4” long.

The pins are let into the edges of the table and leaves then held in place with a bit of glue. One edge of the table gets a single pin and the adjoining edge of the adjacent leave also gets a single pin. On the other side of that leave, two pins, and so forth up to five pins.

The order for the leaves is maintained by matching the number of pins in the edge of the leave with the same number of pins in the adjacent leave, maintaining the grain match. Kudos to jbay for the idea of using pins.

With construction complete, I give the shop a good cleaning and prepare for the finishing steps. I set up my temporary spray booth, which consists of plastic Zip walls and a fan in the window. With this arrangement I have an area of about 10’ x 15’ to work in.

I’ve been working on finish test samples on and off for a while. I’ve always liked the ‘close to the wood’ look and color from oil and varnish type wiping finishes like Waterlox and Arm-R-Seal, but for large projects such as this table spraying is a must. My usual go-to finish for a spray application would be a solvent based nitrocellulose lacquer. Lacquer is easy to apply, forgiving and dries quickly, all good characteristics when applying top coats without the benefit of a proper spray booth. The down side of any solvent based finish is the flammability, toxicity, and messy cleanup. A water based finish is in order. The trick will be to find a water based finish that will not be high build and provide the chatoyance of an oil/varnish.

Next steps: Preparing test samples of various finish options then applying finish.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



12 comments so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5705 posts in 2839 days


#1 posted 08-30-2017 05:04 PM

I’d stick with lacquer for this one. You just can’t beat the way it lays down when sprayed. I have two dining tables in the house that I sprayed with two coats of lacquer years ago. One is a formal dining table, and the other gets used every day. Other than a few dents, they both look like new.

I like Rudd Duracat 550 VOC in the satin sheen.

Good luck finishing up this massive and excellent project.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

1127 posts in 2373 days


#2 posted 08-30-2017 05:54 PM

Can’t wait to see the finished table. Take lots of pictures!!!

I tend to prefer Arm-R-Seal for the look as well as the durability. With your set up you should be able to keep your spray area “clean” and dust free for the longer dry time.

My finishing approach is to spray the first coat on Sunday, wait until Monday after work and take care of any light sanding, and clean off any nubs or dust. Then spray again Tuesday night after wiping the project down a second time. Wednesday is sanding and cleaning, Thursday is spraying, then Friday is more sanding and cleaning with the final coat being sprayed on Saturday. Sunday, I take everything down and do a really light wet sand with super fine paper (6000-8000 grit) if needed and follow up with Behlens Duplexing wax and a really good rub down.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

944 posts in 520 days


#3 posted 08-30-2017 07:28 PM

Willie- it is really risky for me to move away from my ‘tried and true’ finish (nitrocellulose lacquer) for a project with this much time and effort in it for sure. However, my current dining table was sprayed with lacquer and the finish has failed in a few places and the table my mom has is also starting to experience finish failure as well. Both are lacquer and both are 30+ years old at this point. In addition, what ever I choose to spray this table out with will need to carry over to 12 chairs, a sideboard, two corner cabinets and something for storing the leaves. So I need to choose wisely.

Earl- are you spraying Arm-R-Seal? If so how are you reducing it, and with what?

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2075 posts in 1248 days


#4 posted 08-30-2017 08:14 PM

I hate finishing 8^)

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

944 posts in 520 days


#5 posted 08-30-2017 08:27 PM

I hate sanding more. Since most of my early experiences woodworking were paid commissions, I learned to like finishing. It’s the step right before getting a check!

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View DS's profile

DS

2926 posts in 2446 days


#6 posted 08-30-2017 08:52 PM

When you mentioned pegs for your table leaves, I thought you might be talking about these ones from Hafele

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View jbay's profile (online now)

jbay

2340 posts in 924 days


#7 posted 08-30-2017 09:07 PM



I hate sanding more. Since most of my early experiences woodworking were paid commissions, I learned to like finishing. It s the step right before getting a check!

- TungOil

Sanding and finishing is the most important part. It’s not that I so much like doing it, but since it is the most important part, I do get into it. I’m doing a job now that is kicking my butt. It’s a 9’x 9’ wall unit, painted black.
So far, 4 coats of primmer, sanding to a powder baby butt smooth surface to 2 coats of clear. Not happy with the outcome so far so I’m sanding and prepping for a 3rd coat, hoping this is it.

I’m not suggesting you switch to pre-cat for this table,
but you will be much happier with the build and feel and look of pre-cat.
Plus it’s way more durable than nitrocellulose. I’ve used it on more than a few tops.

Good Luck whatever way you go, It’s a very nice table

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

944 posts in 520 days


#8 posted 08-30-2017 10:31 PM



When you mentioned pegs for your table leaves, I thought you might be talking about these ones from Hafele

- DS

DS- I added the alignment pins for the leaves a few weeks ago. I didn’t use the Hafele that you show but very similar style.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

944 posts in 520 days


#9 posted 08-30-2017 10:37 PM



I’m not suggesting you switch to pre-cat for this table,
but you will be much happier with the build and feel and look of pre-cat.
Plus it s way more durable than nitrocellulose. I ve used it on more than a few tops.

- jbay

jbay- I do intend to switch to pre-cat for this series of projects, water based if at all possible. I’m experimenting with the Target products right now, not quite fully happy with the results yet but getting there. the WB stuff behaves differently than solvent based, need to fine tune my technique to get a really exceptional finish but I can see that it is very possible with this system.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

1127 posts in 2373 days


#10 posted 08-31-2017 11:52 AM

Tung – I don’t thin Arm-R-Seal when I spray. It actually seems to go on thinner and with less runs/drips/sags/ than regular poly does. That being said, I also make sure and adjust the spray knob so it is a really fine spray.

I would like to hear your opinion of water based finishes after you try some. I’ve not been too happy with the way the water raises the grain, even after sanding, conditioner, sealers, and multiple coats.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

944 posts in 520 days


#11 posted 08-31-2017 07:08 PM

Earl- I’m working on some samples of the WB finishes and I’ll post the results with my next update. I’ll also try spraying some Arm-R-Seal as well, thanks for the tip.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Mean_Dean's profile (online now)

Mean_Dean

6564 posts in 3173 days


#12 posted 09-01-2017 02:30 AM

Interesting finishing discussion—I’m definitely staying tuned for that!

As others have mentioned, I can’t wait to see the finished project—it’s gonna be a DT3 for sure!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

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