LumberJocks

Dining table inspired by the Greene & Greene Thorsen table #20: Top Assembly, and Ebony Plugs & Splines

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 08-07-2017 01:06 AM 826 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 19: Finish Sanding and Assembly of the Bases Plus Some Ebony Plugs Part 20 of Dining table inspired by the Greene & Greene Thorsen table series no next part

With the bases complete I now assemble the two halves of the top with the table slides and temporarily attach the bases. This allows me to fit the alignment pins for all of the leaves.

To bore the holes for the alignment pins I make up a jig that locates the holes precisely. With five sets of pins and sockets it is critical to get them all aligned.

With the alignment pins in place I can now accurately mark the edges of the leaves for final trimming, which I do with a straight edge and a spiral pattern bit.

Not much room to move in my shop with this table fully assembled. Adding the four leaves extends the table an extra 60”. I use metal slides since they are the only ones strong enough to allow this much extension without a center leg.

Next I move on to making the curved ebony splines. The curve of the splines must match the curve of the table edge. Since the top is elliptical, each spline is different around the table quadrant. I make up four jigs to hold the ebony blanks for pattern routing. I had a CNC template made to match the four different spline shapes. The templates attach to the top with double sided tape.

The curve and spline profile are formed simultaneously on the router table.

The splines that meet the separation between the table halves are made with a small tab to allow precise fitting along the inside edge.

In addition to the splines, I need additional square ebony plugs for the table top. Making them by hand is very labor intensive, so I utilize a four jaw chuck on the lathe to help speed the process. I first rough the basic pillow shape with a mill bastard file, then sand with sanding sponges to 220, 400 and 600 grit before the final polish with the buffing wheel.

Using this method I can make the plugs in less than half the time and they are more consistent in shape. The plug on the right is made on the lathe, compared to the plug on the left which is made by hand. I like the consistent shape of the lathe turned plug.

Next step: Fabricate additional square plugs, rectangular plugs and straight splines for the leaves and table tops then fit and install.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



4 comments so far

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5541 posts in 2863 days


#1 posted 08-08-2017 02:34 AM

Man you’re as bad as Norm—you’ve got a jig for everything!

Well, you’re really making some good progress on this table, and it truly will be a masterpiece that’ll get handed down to future generations!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

491 posts in 211 days


#2 posted 08-08-2017 03:50 AM

I believe I have made more jigs for this project and the last set of G&G tables I made than I did in the entire 40+ years before hand.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

464 posts in 2064 days


#3 posted 08-08-2017 04:52 PM

Well at least we know who to ask about jigs for a G&G table, or splines, or plugs, or….well just about anything that has to do with G&G. The plugs and splines are one of the elements that really makes G&G furniture stand out. Can’t wait to see the finished project.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

491 posts in 211 days


#4 posted 08-08-2017 06:57 PM

I’m happy to talk about my jigs for G&G in more detail of there is interest, and there are certainly quite a few, but the real experts are Darrell Peart and William Ng and many others here on LJ.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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