LumberJocks

Dining table inspired by the Greene & Greene Thorsen table #17: Completing the remaining mortise and tenon joints

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 07-17-2017 04:04 AM 2214 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 16: Starting the pedestal bases Part 17 of Dining table inspired by the Greene & Greene Thorsen table series Part 18: Clamping Cauls, Finger Joints and Square Plug Stock »

With the first set of mortise and tenon joints finished its now time to complete the remaining mortise and tenon joinery. To maximize strength, I cut a double 2” tenon in my stretchers and aprons.

The tenons are offset to the outside to maximize the tenon size on the 30 degree angle.

The Leigh FMT Pro handles angled tenons up to 30 degrees easily.

There are six angled joints on each pedestal base. Any error in the angle of the setup will be multiplied across the six joints so I set up the Leigh jig carefully. To assure accuracy, I use a 30 degree machinists angle to set up the jig.

The extra effort assures tight fitting joints.

I make up a quick routing template for an interior apron that must clear the slides and route away the clearance openings.

A quick dry fit shows everything comes together nicely so far.

28 mortise and tenon joints completed so far.

Next step: cut the finger joints and fit the top apron

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



7 comments so far

View RichTaylor's profile

RichTaylor

1151 posts in 282 days


#1 posted 07-17-2017 04:25 AM

Looking good, Tung. That’s an impressive jig. I have their old MMT jig that fits on my original D4, but have never used it. I use the D4 all the time, but the MMT seemed like more of an afterthought, using a stop for the router base rather than the router bushing.

You’re a talented guy. Thanks for sharing.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5523 posts in 2840 days


#2 posted 07-17-2017 10:40 PM

Those angled joints are really turning out nicely! This is going to be an amazing looking table when it’s finished!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

392 posts in 188 days


#3 posted 07-18-2017 03:43 AM

thanks guys! It’s starting to look like a table now, there is light at the end of the tunnel.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

444 posts in 2041 days


#4 posted 07-18-2017 04:51 PM

Wow those are some clean tenons. Bases look great. Are you also sanding things as you go?

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

392 posts in 188 days


#5 posted 07-18-2017 06:21 PM

Thanks Earl. Yes, I will sand everything to 220 before final assembly. I still have a good bit of milling to do before that, need to cut the slots, round over all the edges, cut the square holes for the plugs, etc.

I’m also a bit concerned about sturdiness of the base. I plan to clamp up one of the bases and put one of the top halves on it to see if I need to add any additional bracing. It would be disappointing to glue everything up only to find its a bit wobbly for some reason. I’m worried about it not having sufficient torsional strength (twisting motion of the top, looking down from above).

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

444 posts in 2041 days


#6 posted 07-19-2017 05:31 PM

“Torsional strength” – only time I hear that is when I’m reviewing structural drawings at work.

I think it will depend on how the outer leg section attaches to the top since the inner legs will have the center of the table top to hold things in place. Worst case, you might need a support between the top of the outer legs and the cross brace of the inner ones.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

392 posts in 188 days


#7 posted 07-20-2017 12:46 AM

I dry clamped one of the bases tonight. Pretty rigid even with a just few bar clamps holding it together. I think my concerns are unfounded. I plan to run cleats along the insides of both top stretchers so I can screw the base securely to the top.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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