LumberJocks

Dining table inspired by the Greene & Greene Thorsen table #8: Bagging the Leaves and a Design Change

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Blog entry by TungOil posted 03-29-2017 02:39 AM 2226 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Preparing Cores and First Test Bagged Board Part 8 of Dining table inspired by the Greene & Greene Thorsen table series Part 9: Gluing Up the Leaves »

Time to start vacuum pressing the boards. I start with the leaves on the theory that if something does not come out quite right, the mistake will be hidden away most of the year. I spread out all of the veneers to arrange and number them in the preferred sequence on the ping pong table, which makes a convenient work surface for sorting and arranging.

For this table I like the look of a slip match arrangement over book match.

My original design has three 20” wide leaves. One issue with such wide leaves is what to do with them when they are not in the table? As I arrange the veneer for the leaves, they look too wide. Sometimes what looks good on paper just doesn’t work in the real world. The solution is a design change to four 15” wide leaves. The narrower leaves look better and will be easier to handle. In addition, by decreasing the width of each leaf they are now narrow enough to fit inside a ‘storage bench’ when not in use that will also act as additional seating when needed. Problems solved.

The exposed edges of the table an leaves need a finished edge. I begin by vacuum pressing the plywood cores without veneer then glue on some 1/2” wide sapele edging.

The edging is left slightly proud of the plywood surface and trimmed later with a flush trim bit in the router table.

With the veneer sorted and arranged I start bagging the leaves.

Working within the 40 minute open time of the adhesive, I can prepare and bag two boards at a time. Since the adhesive requires 6 hours to cure completely, I can get 2 to 4 boards completed in a day. Here I have boards for three of the four leaves vacuum pressed.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"



11 comments so far

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7745 posts in 2612 days


#1 posted 03-29-2017 04:35 AM

I am curious as to why you don’t assemble the leaves before veneering them ….... or am I missing something.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

710 posts in 309 days


#2 posted 03-29-2017 11:55 AM

Hi Paul-

My original plan was to cut thicker (~1/8”) shop sawn veneer, laminate up ‘boards’ then treat them like solid lumber by edge gluing them for assembly. In hindsight, my veneers finished up thinner than originally planned (they are just a bit over 1/16” thick) so I probable could have used traditional veneering techniques instead. The idea is to be able to flatten everything with the drum sander after glue up, but with the thinner veneers I’m losing that advantage. I’m still going forward with this method.

If I were doing this again, I would go the traditional route and veneer up the whole top or leaf in one go. I would also buy the veneers, not shop saw them. I was unaware that I could get 1/16” sapele veneer from Certainly Wood until after I had cut my own. Although they only have QS in the heavier veneer, no highly figured. Hindsight is always 20/20 I suppose.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7745 posts in 2612 days


#3 posted 03-29-2017 02:14 PM

That’s answers my question. I think you are on the right track and have learned from your experience. IMHO there are more pitfalls in veneering first and assembling “like boards” than in veneering whole pieces.
Keep an eye on Certainly Wood’s stock. It changes all the time and what they have (or don’t have) today can change tomorrow.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

558 posts in 2162 days


#4 posted 03-29-2017 05:02 PM

Once again I learned something. I’ve been making my own version of veneer, or using solid wood because I couldn’t find plywood with a thick enough veneer to stand up to finish sanding and wear and tear. I will be checking out Certainly Wood as I work on projects that need large panels.

this is one of those times when I wonder if making veneer is any less time consuming or expensive than making large flat panels from solid wood.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

710 posts in 309 days


#5 posted 03-29-2017 05:18 PM

Hi Earl-

Certainly Wood is a great resource for veneer for sure!

I wish I could have used solid materials. On this table that would have been a disaster however, since the edge border runs cross grained to most of the top. It would have come apart in under a year with the humidity swings we get here in eastern PA.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7745 posts in 2612 days


#6 posted 03-29-2017 06:05 PM

Certainly Wood “special thickness” veneers.
https://www.certainlywood.com/woodmenu2.php?category=Special%20Thickness%20Veneers

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View horky's profile

horky

205 posts in 2744 days


#7 posted 03-29-2017 09:43 PM

20/20 hind sight is a great thing. Table is going to be beautiful for sure. I did a very similar thing with shop made veneers, cut to about 1/16, and did edge glue them after running through a drum sander. Then vacuum pressed them for a table top

I also did it for the bottom veneer (Purchased) ... about 0.020” thick …

That leaf is 18×40+. I did the same with the ends … 36 ish x 40+. All worked well. Some scrapping/sanding, flat as a pancake. Note, I only used one layer of plywood.

Project: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/235914
I hope the pics show up … don’t know what happened to them.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

710 posts in 309 days


#8 posted 03-29-2017 11:51 PM

horky, looks great!

I’ll likely veneer the two large ends of the table as a single layup instead of making individual boards. I’ll need to order some veneer tape tonight.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5624 posts in 2961 days


#9 posted 03-31-2017 12:58 AM

I guess you can call this a learning process—for all of us!

Thanks for sharing this project with us!

-- Dean -- "Don't give up the ship -- fight her 'till she sinks!" Capt James Lawrence USN

View Kelster58's profile

Kelster58

298 posts in 354 days


#10 posted 04-08-2017 12:53 AM

Seems like you are making great progress…..Thanks for allowing us to look in on your build.

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

View htl's profile

htl

3058 posts in 973 days


#11 posted 04-11-2017 08:01 PM

Very interesting project and problems.
There’s all ways a hundred ways to get er done and reading Lumber Jocks we get exposed to many of the different ways things can get done.
Ways I have never hear of before but now add them to my list of [this could work here].
Got to love it!!!

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

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