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I have a Question!!!!! ABout stripping Furniture

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Blog entry by Joshua Howe posted 06-05-2009 04:21 PM 1729 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Okay I am stripping an old cedar chest. I stripped it 2days ago. I got 90% of what I think is a polyurethane clear off. (I had a few quarter size spots that where left behind) So I have been sanding on this thing and it keeps gumming up my 80 grit sandpaper. I moved to the belt sander 80 grit same thing. I tried slowing the speed down on both the orbital and the belt sanders to the first setting which is A on mine. Didn’t build up as fast but still did. Not making a lot of progress here. One thing I can think of is the stripper said to use mineral spirits and water to finish. I used water but no spirits because I didn’t want the oil in the wood because I will be using a water base clear after words. So please dump your insight on me! How do I save my sandpaper and get this stuff off?

The build up has also made the wood look like a resiny wood kind of like antique pine but you can get past this. I have seen pretty cedar in one area just took a while and 3- 80 grit belts(2ft x 2ft area)

-- Wood,clay,metal, and stone are all just materials, until an artist's hand touches them.--TreeFormDesign



10 comments so far

View Julian's profile

Julian

880 posts in 2986 days


#1 posted 06-05-2009 04:40 PM

What oil are you talking about? Mineral spirits is necessary to help break down the finish and get it off. Mineral spirits will evaporate and anything left should easily be sanded or scraped off.

-- Julian, Park Forest, IL

View spaids's profile

spaids

699 posts in 3154 days


#2 posted 06-05-2009 05:07 PM

If you use oil on your stripper furniture then how will she hold on to the pole?

-- Wipe the blood stains from your blade before coming in.--

View Joshua Howe's profile

Joshua Howe

71 posts in 2935 days


#3 posted 06-05-2009 05:12 PM

Okay so I have used mineral spirits before to clean paint off my hands and I had an oily residue on my hands but this was the one gal plastic jug that says paint thinner in big text and mineral spirits at the bottom is the same thing.
And will the oily residue I felt on my hands evaporate away or will it soak into the wood and effect the finish I apply later.

-- Wood,clay,metal, and stone are all just materials, until an artist's hand touches them.--TreeFormDesign

View Joshua Howe's profile

Joshua Howe

71 posts in 2935 days


#4 posted 06-05-2009 05:13 PM

Okay my stripper is very talented! And she is very use to being oiled up!

-- Wood,clay,metal, and stone are all just materials, until an artist's hand touches them.--TreeFormDesign

View Kindlingmaker's profile

Kindlingmaker

2656 posts in 2987 days


#5 posted 06-05-2009 05:14 PM

Use the mineral spirts…

-- Never board, always knotty, lots of growth rings

View Joshua Howe's profile

Joshua Howe

71 posts in 2935 days


#6 posted 06-05-2009 05:16 PM

So can I just wipe it down with mineral spirits let it dry and sand OR do I need to re strip it and follow the directions this time with mineral spirits?

-- Wood,clay,metal, and stone are all just materials, until an artist's hand touches them.--TreeFormDesign

View jlsmith5963's profile

jlsmith5963

297 posts in 2809 days


#7 posted 06-05-2009 05:24 PM

perhaps this might help you sort through your questions:
http://home.howstuffworks.com/how-to-strip-wooden-furniture.htm

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

View Joshua Howe's profile

Joshua Howe

71 posts in 2935 days


#8 posted 06-05-2009 05:31 PM

Awesome That is exactly my problem solver thanks jlsmith
I knew the build up on my sandpaper reminded me of paraffin wax that we used in my bronze casting class years ago.

-- Wood,clay,metal, and stone are all just materials, until an artist's hand touches them.--TreeFormDesign

View Kent Shepherd's profile

Kent Shepherd

2716 posts in 2747 days


#9 posted 06-05-2009 05:40 PM

In stripping, I always made sure I got everything off first with the paint remover. I frequently used course steel wool with the remover to help get the finish off. Then, I washed it down with lacquer thinner, which is not as oily as mineral spirits. The extra time you spend in the stripping process will be time well spent when it comes to sanding, I never washed it down with water, but I guess some strippers call for that. I personally don’t like soaking a piece of furniture with water. I guess I’m suggesting you go back and do some more stripping. (Furniture that is!)

By the way. if you use lacquer thinner, be sure it’s well ventilated. You can get high!

-- http://shepherdtoolandsupply.com/

View jlsmith5963's profile

jlsmith5963

297 posts in 2809 days


#10 posted 06-05-2009 07:50 PM

joshua – glad to hear you found the link useful…

-- criticism: the art of analyzing and evaluating the quality of an artistic work...

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