LumberJocks

Stanley #29 Transitional "Chute (Shoot) Plane and Board"

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Blog entry by Trakem2 posted 09-25-2015 03:17 AM 1614 reads 1 time favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a Stanley #29 Fore plane that I converted into a chute plane. Since I am on a tight budget, I couldnt afford a LV or LN chute plane, so I decided to make a chute plane from a transitional plane after seeing what poopiekat came up with. Bought the 29 off the bay for less than 20 bucks. When I got it it needed a little work to flatten the sole and square the right side to the sole. I then needed to come up with a way to get the tote to a comfortable position, so I fitted a block to fit over the casting and angled the side to about 30 degrees to attach the tote. Also added a small block by the knob to guide the front of the plane. Sharpened the original stanley blade and put it work. Have used it on a few small projects and so far is doing a great job, if it continues to work as good as it is I may invest in replacing the blade with a heavier Hock blade.

-- The old ways worked then, and they still do today! Randy



13 comments so far

View David Taylor's profile

David Taylor

326 posts in 553 days


#1 posted 09-25-2015 03:52 AM

There’s thinking outside the box! I especially like the use of the Incra miter to set the angle of the fence. Why can’t I think of cool stuff like that? I hope you don’t mind me stealing this one!

-- Learn Relentlessly

View lepelerin's profile

lepelerin

478 posts in 1791 days


#2 posted 09-25-2015 07:43 AM

Really cool. I got a similar plane as yours (from my grand father), he would appreciate if I make use of it.
Well done.

View kiefer's profile

kiefer

4881 posts in 2133 days


#3 posted 09-25-2015 02:47 PM

I too have been playing around with a shooting board and this is exactly what I am going to make .
I hope you don’t mind and thanks for doing all the thinking .

Klaus

-- Kiefer https://www.youtube.com/user/woodkiefer1/videos

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3200 days


#4 posted 09-25-2015 03:46 PM

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/34646

I really like your use of an Incra mitre gauge for cross-cutting angles.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View BDormer's profile

BDormer

1 post in 440 days


#5 posted 09-25-2015 04:12 PM

I’ve been thinking about building a shooting board with an Incra Miter gauge. How are you holding the fence so it doesn’t shift when you are planing? Do you find this setup works well, or does the fence “give” too much under the force of planing?

Thanks

bd

View Trakem2's profile

Trakem2

26 posts in 1516 days


#6 posted 09-25-2015 08:57 PM

I wish I could take credit for the idea of using the Incra miter gauge, but I cant, I saw it posted somewhere but cant remember where. The miter gauge is held in place with a single screw through the miter bar, so it can be removed and used on the tablesaw or elsewhere. The wooden fence is attached with two screws and slides back and forth so it can backup the cut so there is no tearout. Once the gauge is locked in position there is no give in it at all. One thing I’m thinking about doing is to make the board inclined to get a skewing action to the cut and spread the wear out over more of the blade. Thanks for the comments and questions.

-- The old ways worked then, and they still do today! Randy

View JayT's profile

JayT

4785 posts in 1677 days


#7 posted 09-25-2015 09:38 PM

Nicely done. No reason that shouldn’t work very well for shooting. The Incra gauge for doing different angles is a nice touch. poopiekat’s modifications inspired my transitional based shooter, as well, though I went just a little farther in the design and construction.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3200 days


#8 posted 09-27-2015 06:20 PM

I recall the suggestions for inclining the stock fence, but I am not sure whether this would work on angles other than 90 degree end cuts. Seems to me it would introduce a compound angle to the surface… but whenever I try to visualize it, my head explodes.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Trakem2's profile

Trakem2

26 posts in 1516 days


#9 posted 09-27-2015 06:53 PM

I never thought about that, will have to do some experimenting.

-- The old ways worked then, and they still do today! Randy

View Trakem2's profile

Trakem2

26 posts in 1516 days


#10 posted 09-27-2015 09:57 PM

Poopiekat, your right about the inclined ramp producing a compound angle, works great at 90 degrees but not at any other angle.

-- The old ways worked then, and they still do today! Randy

View Don W's profile

Don W

17971 posts in 2033 days


#11 posted 09-27-2015 10:50 PM

Nicely done!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.net

View JayT's profile

JayT

4785 posts in 1677 days


#12 posted 09-27-2015 11:08 PM



Poopiekat, your right about the inclined ramp producing a compound angle, works great at 90 degrees but not at any other angle.

- Trakem2

Why? As long as the fence is perpendicular to the sloped surface vertically, then the angle on the fence will give you your final angle on the work piece. Yes, the plane will hit it at a compound angle, but that is no different than a skewed shooting plane. The final result will always be the angle between the fence and the ramp.

-- "Good judgement is the result of experience. A lot of experience is the result of poor judgement."

View Trakem2's profile

Trakem2

26 posts in 1516 days


#13 posted 09-28-2015 12:44 AM

JayT you are right. That’s what I was thinking in the first place, but I didn’t notice a spot of dried glue on the underside of the scrap I was using and it was throwing things off just enough to be noticeable. Please forgive tired, old eyes. Tried a different piece of wood and angles of 22.5, 30 and 45 degrees and they all came out square to the face like they should. Thanks for questioning that and making me go back and check my initial results.

-- The old ways worked then, and they still do today! Randy

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