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Sharpening Table Saw blades by hand and cutting nails

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Blog entry by TopamaxSurvivor posted 1299 days ago 4343 reads 0 times favorited 30 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I decided to sharpen the firewood/ pallet blade today. It was cutting pretty slow. Thank goodness it is a combination blade without too many teeth. While I was filing, the first time I have tried this by the way :-)), I thought I should have put the blade on backwards and jointed it with a file. Has anyone ever done this?

20 minutes after fininshing the filing, I hit a nail!! Murphy’s law, I thought about that before I filed, but it did cut very well and I could defiinitely tell the difference after I hit it. The filing job must have been ok, eh? :-))

BTW, I cut for several days breaking down pallets before I hit the first nail ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence



30 comments so far

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4327 posts in 1620 days


#1 posted 1299 days ago

You might like to try a pocket metal detector. They’re not expensive. Well less expensive than a blade, even an old one.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14549 posts in 2260 days


#2 posted 1298 days ago

I have one too, but I’m breaking down pallets for fire wood. I am using an old used blade that I don’t care much about. I am usually cutting between nails. This one was hidden a little and got the edge. If I were giong to plane or use a good blade, I would be using the detector. It would go nuts if it saw what I am doing:-)) BTW, have an old used table saw too. Don’t want to use good tools for rough and tumble work ;-))

I was rather pleased at my first attempt at table saw blade sharpening. The main thing I am wondering about is jointing that blade running it backwards???

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4327 posts in 1620 days


#3 posted 1298 days ago

I admire your tenacity.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View Hoakie's profile

Hoakie

306 posts in 2620 days


#4 posted 1298 days ago

Pallet + Sawzall = firewood.

-- John H. [To invent, you need a good imagination and a pile of junk. ~Edison]

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14549 posts in 2260 days


#5 posted 1298 days ago

Too slow ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1831 posts in 1581 days


#6 posted 1298 days ago

I would worry about the RPM. A file doesn’t seem to work at that speed. You might want to try and make a JIG on your drill press, backwards blade and only 100 RPM. Your Table Saw runs at 3450 RPM.
IF you try it and you still have fingers to type with ,let us know how it turned out. !
Consider knocking a tooth OFF at high speed and hitting you !

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4064 posts in 1440 days


#7 posted 1298 days ago

I use my 4” angle grinder.
It is quick you don’t even need to remove the saw blade.
I don’t know about accuracy it worked fine with cutting rail road ties that were full of all sorts of …........
I also did this on bandsaw blades.

Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View rance's profile

rance

4125 posts in 1744 days


#8 posted 1298 days ago

Topo, I thought I was the only one crazy enough to sharpen a blade like that. No, I havn’t sharpened a TS blade but I did do a BS blade a while back. Worked just fine and saved from buying a new one a little while.

I’m having a hard time understanding your question. What is “jointing a TS blade?”. Pictures maybe? :)

Edit: I Googled it and found Popular Science – Sept 1964 issue:
http://books.google.com/books?id=MiYDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA144&lpg=PA144&dq=%22jointing+a+table+saw+blade%22&source=bl&ots=CuatLs9TRb&sig=ThRyhaBUx-Q_gaaWHf1jfqtz2CM&hl=en#v=onepage&q=%22jointing%20a%20table%20saw%20blade%22&f=false

or http://tinyurl.com/2ek89vj

Interesting. Looks like it turns it into a Rip blade as a side benefit.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14549 posts in 2260 days


#9 posted 1298 days ago

Jointing a saw blade like a hand saw = filing all the teeth to the same height.

I was mostly wondering if jointing it like that would be feasible. I was a bit concerned about the speed of the blade and file wipe out. :-)) For the purpose I am resharpening, I doubt if jointing will matter much.

Don’t worry about my fingers. I love them, all 10 of them! Well, 8 pluse the thumbs. I would definitely try it with some kind of jig holding the file, even on a drill press at slow speed. While i was fililng, i thought about a holder that teh blase could be raised up to just touch. Then thoughts of the speed putting a groove in the file crept into my head ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Todd A. Clippinger's profile

Todd A. Clippinger

8705 posts in 2683 days


#10 posted 1298 days ago

I would think that if you are sharpening a blade with carbide teeth that stones would work better than a file.

Wouldn’t the file tend to chip the brittle teeth?

I suppose if you are cutting pallets and using a file on it you have pretty much written the blade off already anyway though.

The blades I use on my circular saw are definitely backfill blades, they get used for general construction/carpentry and they do not get sharpened. They usually end up losing a lot teeth and it does not matter how cheap or expensive they are, they all suffer the same fate.

-- Todd A. Clippinger, Montana, http://americancraftsmanworkshop.com

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6067 posts in 1384 days


#11 posted 1298 days ago

I once cut a 2” hard maple bench top with a circular saw and hit a hidden 1/2” threaded rod inside. It took every single carbide tooth off the blade, and boy was it hard to get the rest of the way through the maple top without teeth. I miss that saw…

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View Karson's profile

Karson

34842 posts in 2984 days


#12 posted 1298 days ago

When I was making my bowling alley kitchen counter I bought a nail cutting blade made by Dewalt I think. It fits aq skill saw and it worked great. I’d see lots of sparks as the blade hit the hardened nails and it kept on cutting. You might check them out Cheap enough I think I might have bought 4 or 5 on ebay for a buck a piece.

By the way this post is number 10 on google search under “nail cutting blades”

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View HokieMojo's profile

HokieMojo

2097 posts in 2312 days


#13 posted 1298 days ago

does your combo blade have a flat grind? I thought they are usually ATB grinds on combo blades.

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

14549 posts in 2260 days


#14 posted 1298 days ago

The blade looks like it had a ATB, but is wearing down.

Thanks Karson, I didn’t know they made nail cutting blades. I’ll see what I can find. I have wood augers that will eat 16 d nails for breakfast :-))

No carbide Todd. I thought about al those little chips breaking off doing demo work before I startted. I bought several old blades for a guy here on LJ, I believe just to use for “rough work” :-)) He was selling them as basically scrap for not much or maybe I just paid the shipping. Not sure any more.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Dan's profile

Dan

3543 posts in 1464 days


#15 posted 1298 days ago

I also cut up a lot of scrap wood for fire wood. I am always worried about hitting a nail or screw. I doubt a nail or two would hurt the blade much though. I was cutting scraps with a carbide blade that had 4 broken teeth and it still cut the wood good enough.

I use my Miter saw, table saw and RAS to cut up scraps. I will even cut small logs on the miter saw using a rip blade. It cuts through the logs like a knife through butter.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

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