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Workshop #3: Things that make you go Hmmmmm

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Blog entry by Tomcat1066 posted 02-12-2008 01:15 PM 1010 reads 0 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Yet Another possibility here Part 3 of Workshop series Part 4: Tool Storage »

With the saw vise complete, I found myself thinking about my workshop once again. The saw vise was done completely outside in the open, and I found it pretty nice to get some fresh air while working. This has be doing even more thinking about an outside workshop. Besides the space issues, which I’ve lamented more than once, there’s just something nice about working like that.

You see, that little storage room that will be the shop isn’t climate controlled at all. After all, who’d run duct work to a storage room? Now, in winter, a space heater would do wonders with such a small location. But in summer, I can actually see the heat being to much. Remember, this is Southwest Georgia. While winters are brutal for many of you folks, summers here are the killer. 95 degrees with 95% humidity aren’t unusual for us at all. An outside shop will give me the opportunity to catch breezes that will make it a bit easier to deal with.

Now, don’t get me wrong. I’d still prefer a decent sized freestanding shop, but any I’d select would have windows that can be opened! It gets really hot down here, and I’d like to work year round if at all possible. However, a decent sized canopy costs a lot less than a freestanding shop!

The one concern I have is rain and wind combined. However, on one end of the porch, there is a brick wall adjacent to the other back yard (this is a duplex). This gives me two walls worth of protection, which should protect my “shop” from all but the hardest rains with wind. However, walls can be rigged up with tarps and put in place to give additional protection.

Tools can, and probably will, get rusty. However, this is Southwest Georgia. That would probably happen in the storage room as well. That just means I’ll have to be careful and take good care of them. However, tool storage can fix that.

In the 18th Century, the huge honking tool chests like the Benjamin Seaton chest and the Duncan Phyfe chest weren’t very portable. They’re mucking HUGE! What they did apparently do well are the two things I need. They provided protection from theft, and they provided protection from rust. Adam Cherubini noted on his blog once upon a time that the chests like the Seaton and the Phyfe were found in more urban areas, while tool walls were often found in more rural locales. The chests can lock, while the walls obviously can’t. And, since a well made tool chest is apparently fairly air tight, it might just be the option to go with.

Honestly, this system actually has fewer drawbacks, at least in my mind, than most of the other options I’ve considered with the exception of a freestanding shop. However, the drawbacks it has (security and weather) are pretty significant. I think I have figured out how to deal with those though, and should really consider this one seriously. It just might work!

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!



8 comments so far

View Eric's profile

Eric

875 posts in 3250 days


#1 posted 02-12-2008 02:17 PM

I, too, have had thoughts about working outside after doing some hand planing out in our driveway. But the morning sun there is brutal, so I would never work out there in the morning. Otherwise, I seriously might consider putting my bench there!

-- Eric at https://adventuresinwoodworking.wordpress.com/

View Jimthecarver's profile

Jimthecarver

1123 posts in 3252 days


#2 posted 02-12-2008 04:02 PM

I couldnt imagine subjecting my trusty table saw to the elements. I live in sunny So. Cal. and the weather is very dry here, which has its draw backs as well. We are thinking of moving back east maybe Tenn. but I didnt think of my saw rusting or other tools turning that dreaded rust color. What do you to stop that from happening?

-- Can't never could do anything, to try is to advance.

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 3262 days


#3 posted 02-12-2008 04:05 PM

Well, being that I’m a hand tool guy, I don’t have to worry about a table saw :)

Seriously, I figure that something like Boeshield and paste wax will help prevent it, and quick removal of surface rust when it does show up is probably the best course of action I’d think.

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

View gizmodyne's profile

gizmodyne

1770 posts in 3556 days


#4 posted 02-12-2008 04:12 PM

Give it a go. The lowest cost investment here is a canopy which is sure to have some other uses. Controlling the moisture of your wood is probably going to be a bigger challenge. Though if you just keep the projects near by they should be ok.

Does anyone know what happens when you bring a board from outside humididty of 95% into an a.c. controlled environment?

Do you have a.c.?

-- -John "Do I have to keep typing a smiley? Just assume it's a joke." www.flickr.com/photos/gizmodyne

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 3262 days


#5 posted 02-12-2008 04:15 PM

Giz, yep…got the AC. What I figured I’d do is store the wood in the storage room (it’s for storage,right?) with a dehumidifier running, so that it’s exposure to the moisture would be minimal.

I’m not sure how that would work though, but it’s worth a shot.

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 3288 days


#6 posted 02-12-2008 06:28 PM

Another thing you might consider is a gazebo. These are available at Lowe’s, Wal-Mart etc, are relatively inexpensiive and cover up to about a 10×10 area. Put up one of these against the brick wall and you have an open air shop with a waterproof canopy. I put one on my uncovered deck and the canopy lasted about 2 years. You could put your tool box under it and run bolt it to the concrete from the inside. I will guarantee no one would be “borrowing” it.

Just some thoughts.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 3262 days


#7 posted 02-12-2008 06:49 PM

That’s definitely something to look into Scott. I’d have to look at the total costs and see! Thanks :)

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

View Bulldog's profile

Bulldog

7 posts in 3219 days


#8 posted 02-16-2008 07:48 PM

Many years ago, when everyone used hand tools, they would put a block of champhor in the chest to prevent rust. I cannot find blocks of champhor now.

-- Bulldog

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