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The Joiner and the Cabinetmaker #1: The Packing Box - A Preamble Ramble

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Blog entry by Tomcat1066 posted 1029 days ago 4269 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of The Joiner and the Cabinetmaker series Part 2: The Packing Box Part 2 »

I had previously mentioned my intention to, more or less, follow the steps as outlined in The Joiner and the Cabinetmaker as a way to sort of do a “self apprenticeship”. That intention still holds as I gear up for the first project, which is the packing box.

For those who haven’t read the book, the packing box was needed in a hurry and is a relatively rough piece of work. However, that doesn’t mean you can just slap it together either.

In the book the packing box is needed to be assembled over the span of a few hours with no option but to use hand tools. This means that, all things being equal, this should make a nice weekend project if nothing else. The box doesn’t require fancy joinery or anything else. It’s put together with cut nails, most of which are clenched.

At this point in time, I’m accumulating a handful of things that are necessary for the project. For example, a nail set. I also need to get a steel plate for clenching. I’m not really sure where to snag one at, so I’m open for suggestions.

The project will probably begin in the next week to ten days. Why the delay? Mostly because I’m in the process of buying a business and have some obligations towards that goal this weekend. I’m not sure if anyone else here has made the packing box, but if you have, I’d love to get any pointers you have for me.

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!



6 comments so far

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 2393 days


#1 posted 1029 days ago

Cool. I hope you enjoy it :)

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

View oldwolf's profile

oldwolf

100 posts in 1854 days


#2 posted 1029 days ago

I made my own doweling plate from a chunk of 3/16th” cold roll steel welding stock you can buy from local home centers. I bought a section 3 foot long by 1 1/2” wide and cut off about 8” I drilled three holes for making dowel and left the bottom 3 inches to use as a strike plate. you don’t need much to clench a nail.

I wrote a article on my blog about it. Not to detailed I guess but for what its worth it’s here http://insidetheworkshop.blogspot.com/2010/06/doweling-plate.html

I love this book and I’d like to see where you go with this exploration.

-- Oldwolf - http://insidetheworkshop.blogspot.com/

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3299 posts in 1251 days


#3 posted 1029 days ago

For a clenching nails a tiny 5 lb anvil is VERY nice to have. However cold rolled steel should do the trick just fine.

That box should offer some very good education on jointing and assembly as well as of course perfecting how to drive a nail…a skill that more people need to learn.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 2393 days


#4 posted 1029 days ago

oldwolf: Thanks. I’ve thought about making a doweling plate and using it. The trick is getting hold of a piece of steel. Of course, I can always get a drop from the sheet metal place or something like that. In fact, we may have something laying around work I can snag as a going away present :D

RG: I agree completely about driving a nail. I used to work construction and never did get really good at it. You also touch on part of the reason I’m planning on working through the book, and that’s how it teaches a new lesson or two with each projects. Jointing and assembling are essential regardless of how you fasten a project, so it’s a natural place to start. Then the school box that comes later teaches dovetailing, and the chest of drawers at the end has much more advanced joinery.

All in all, I really think this is a good way to go and it seems you guys agree on some level :)

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

View David Grimes's profile

David Grimes

2072 posts in 1237 days


#5 posted 1021 days ago

I haven’t read that book, but I take it that it is a learning journey in building useful items in order of difficulty so as to acquire skills as you proceed through the series ?

I anxiously await your product and comments on problems and successes.

-- If you're going to stir the pot, think BIG spoon or SMALL boat paddle. David Grimes, Georgia

View Tomcat1066's profile

Tomcat1066

942 posts in 2393 days


#6 posted 1021 days ago

David,

That’s pretty much it in a nutshell. The story is of an apprentice originally published in1839 and his journey towards becoming a journeyman. It has three projects of varying difficulty outlined. The book itself contains the original book and commentary on the history of the period and a section with more detailed instructions on how to build these projects.

It seemed like a good place to start :)

-- "Give me your poor tools, your tired steel, your huddled masses of rust." Yep, I ripped off the Statue of Liberty. That's how I roll!

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