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Do you have bumps on your surface?

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Blog entry by A Slice of Wood Workshop posted 09-16-2011 09:00 AM 1865 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is a very short video of how I apply polyurethane on my projects to get them bump free and streak free. It has taken practice over the few years of woodworking. I used to have those bumps all over my projects and you could definetly see them in the light. I now have it to where those little bumps are gone. As always, comments are welcome (we all need them, they help us learn). Thanks for viewing.

-- Tim- http://www.asliceofwoodworkshop.com; Twitter-@asliceofwood; Facebook-http://www.facebook.com/asliceofwood



9 comments so far

View StumpyNubs's profile

StumpyNubs

6192 posts in 1458 days


#1 posted 09-16-2011 02:00 PM

What is this… “The Blair Wood Project”? Maybe you should turn off a few more lights in that shop, I could still see a little bit!

Thanks for the tips- keep ‘em coming!

-- It's the best woodworking show since the invention of wood... New episodes at: http://www.stumpynubs.com

View A Slice of Wood Workshop's profile

A Slice of Wood Workshop

891 posts in 1830 days


#2 posted 09-16-2011 02:31 PM

@stumpynubs- HAHA maybe the next investment will be some overhead lighting. I could definetly use it!

-- Tim- http://www.asliceofwoodworkshop.com; Twitter-@asliceofwood; Facebook-http://www.facebook.com/asliceofwood

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4372 posts in 1693 days


#3 posted 09-16-2011 06:58 PM

Spooky!

Good advice though.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View amagineer's profile

amagineer

1385 posts in 1254 days


#4 posted 09-16-2011 10:39 PM

Thanks for the finishing tip. So, by using less light when applying the finish there will be less bumps? Just joking, I couldn’t help myself.

-- Flaws are only in the eye of the artisan!

View Stevinmarin's profile

Stevinmarin

837 posts in 1733 days


#5 posted 09-17-2011 12:04 AM

I use those same containers when they are “done” in the house. (Or I hide the lids!) Or my wife decides to donate them to the cause.

Thanks for the poly tips. The only thing I find frustrating with it is that you have to sand between coats. It seems to take forever to build up a good finish. Have you used wiping poly?

-- Entertainment for mere mortal woodworkers. http://www.WoodworkingForMereMortals.com

View A Slice of Wood Workshop's profile

A Slice of Wood Workshop

891 posts in 1830 days


#6 posted 09-17-2011 12:18 AM

@britbox- I think it would have been spookier with brighter lights….you would’ve seen me :-)

@amagineer- my work is an illusion….I know how to get it nice and smooth and thats what matters! just kidding, wine bottle holders were delivered to their owners today which were gladly accepted.

@steve- what can I say, I like to recycle those containers. I try to buy the sandwich meat in those plastic containers “for future use in the house”. Seems they fit nicely in the shop. I have not tried wipe on poly, but I am ready to start experimenting with some different finishes. Will be building/filming a mission style quilt rack in the next weeks, will have to try something new. Enjoyed your shadow box video by the way.

-- Tim- http://www.asliceofwoodworkshop.com; Twitter-@asliceofwood; Facebook-http://www.facebook.com/asliceofwood

View Stevinmarin's profile

Stevinmarin

837 posts in 1733 days


#7 posted 09-17-2011 01:07 AM

I’ve never tried this, but apparently, “wiping poly” is simply regular poly that has been cut in half with mineral spirits. You can make your own that way. It’s a bit easier to apply but takes more coats. Well, now that I think about it, is there any advantage to that? Anyway, looking forward to more videos.

-- Entertainment for mere mortal woodworkers. http://www.WoodworkingForMereMortals.com

View rance's profile

rance

4132 posts in 1818 days


#8 posted 09-17-2011 03:13 AM

Good information. Thanks for sharing.

From my calculations though, it comes to 20% MS, not 25%.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View A Slice of Wood Workshop's profile

A Slice of Wood Workshop

891 posts in 1830 days


#9 posted 09-17-2011 03:24 AM

@steve-yeah, sounds like the advantages are lacking. Next time I will try some laquer, easier for the build up.

@rance-hmmmm, seems as if you are correct. Looks like I left a part out. Usually though, the calculations go something like this…..a splash of this and a couple drops of that. Haha, thanks for your correction.

-- Tim- http://www.asliceofwoodworkshop.com; Twitter-@asliceofwood; Facebook-http://www.facebook.com/asliceofwood

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