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Reclaimed Pine All-Weather Morris Chair #8: Plugging & Drilling

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Blog entry by TimBridge posted 05-23-2014 06:49 PM 1863 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: Back rest Part 8 of Reclaimed Pine All-Weather Morris Chair series Part 9: Finish Test Palette »

Next on the list was plugging all the screw holes and drilling holes for the recliner bar.

I was considering making the plugs out of oak with a plug cutter but after making a test board with the stain and poly I planned to use on the project, I really liked the contrast between regular dowels and the rest of the chair so I opted to go that route. All the plugs were glued in and cut flush to the surface. Thanks much to my fiancee, Dani, for all her help plugging! I know she has a lot of experienced with plugged holes, so I thought she’d be a great help.

I also cut the 45 degree cut outs on the bottom of the back rest. This allows for the backrest to recline further back than 90 degrees.

I also made the second mistake of my project here. The front-most hole in the armrest was drilled about an 1/8” too far to the right. I later fixed that by clamping a thin piece of scrap over the whole thing, redrawing my center lines, and drilling straight through again. This left a little crescent shaped “pocket” to the right of the final hole, but I filled it in with wood putty. It will hardly be seen anyway since the recliner support bar will cover it 66% of the time (unless it;s set into place in the furthest back location.

Click Here for Part Nine

-- Tim Bridge, Northern NJ,"Education is when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don't." Pete Seeger



5 comments so far

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5052 posts in 2611 days


#1 posted 05-24-2014 12:28 AM

Just found this blog. Looks like she’s coming along nicely! Looking forward to seeing the finished chair!

-- Dean

View TimBridge's profile

TimBridge

36 posts in 1036 days


#2 posted 05-25-2014 05:10 AM

Dean,

Thanks for the kind words! I too cannot wait to finish this project up. The finishing step (stain, wiping poly) is taking a lot of time. I think the next time I build an outdoor project, I’m going to opt for a danish oil finish rather than varnish.

My father, however, saw this project and immediately wanted to build one as well so it seems as soon as I wrap this one up, I;m going to be building another one along side him. I’ve learned a lot though on this project so far so I;m excited to utilize those new skills right away in “version 2”.

Tim

-- Tim Bridge, Northern NJ,"Education is when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don't." Pete Seeger

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5052 posts in 2611 days


#3 posted 05-25-2014 05:29 PM

Tim,

You’ll find that once you’ve built one, the next one goes a lot easier, and you’ve already made the mistakes on the first one. I always find myself saying “if I ever make another one of these, it will be a lot better!”

As for the Danish oil, you may want to re-think that. Danish oil isn’t going to hold up to the elements, like varnish. But if you use varnish, be sure it’s outdoor Spar varnish. Spar varnish is a little flexible, so it’ll move when the wood expands and contracts due to the elements. I just refinished all of my outdoor furniture and used a recipe I learned from Tom Silva of This Old House. He recommends a mix of a penetrating oil (like Penofin) and spar varnish, mixed at 8oz varnish to 1 gallon penetrating oil. I used this recipe on my decks last summer, and they came through the winter without fading, and without the usual mildew. The Penofin has UV inhibitors to keep the wood from fading, and the spar varnish has mildewcide which keeps the mildew from growing.

And you’re right, it’s a bit of work! It took two weeks to get my outdoor furniture ready for Memorial Day weekend. I have 4 Adirondack chairs, 2 bistro chairs, 1 bistro table, and 2 side tables. But they look great year after year!

Anyway, good luck, and keep us posted!

-- Dean

View TimBridge's profile

TimBridge

36 posts in 1036 days


#4 posted 05-28-2014 02:24 AM

Mean_Dean,

Thanks for the advice! I’ve read that all finishes fall on a spectrum between film and oil. Film finishes provide the most protection but are much more complex/long to apply and much more difficult to fix a mistake or refinish in the future. Oil finishes provide no protection but are easy to apply and easy to re-finish in the future.

From what I’ve read, Danish Oil, as a mixture of an oil (tung or BLO), a varnish (urethane, Alkyd, or phenolic), and a thinner (naphtha, mineral spirits, paint thinner), is a compromise. It is a finish that provides some protection but is also somewhat easy to apply and re-apply.

So, with a full on “film” style finish like I’ve used in this project of a Spar Varnish, the finish may last up to 5 years before it needs to be refinished but when the time comes, it will be a large® endeavor because it entails stripping the whole thing down and starting fresh. However, with a Danish Oil finish, it will be absolutely necessary to re-finish every year but may only take 1-2 coats yearly instead of 10 coats of pure varnish at once.

All my sources for this information has been from the The Wood Whisperer’s articles and videos about finishing such as:
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/pondering-outdoor-finishes/
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/a-better-way-to-apply-spar-urethane/
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/the-difference-a-film-makes/
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/oil-based-finish-basics/
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/desert-outdoor-finish/

Rest assured that I have used a spar varnish for this project and have applied 10 coats, wiped on after diluting with 50% naphtha. I’m confident I will not have to refinish this chair for at least 3 years but, for all the time and effort (and pausing of other projects I’ve had going on (since I wanted to keep the dust to a minimum in the shop)), Danish oil + refinishing yearly seems like a pretty attractive alternative.

Although I understand that Danish Oil will not provide nearly as much protection as varnish, the yearly re-finishing will help to combat that.

I am a HUGE fan on Tommy Silva though so I must say I am terribly intrigued by his recommendation and am about to scour the interwebs for more information about that.

Thanks again for the advice and taking the time to read!

-- Tim Bridge, Northern NJ,"Education is when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don't." Pete Seeger

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

5052 posts in 2611 days


#5 posted 05-29-2014 12:23 AM

Tim,

Sounds like you’ve thought this through!

Speaking of Tom Silva, I thought I’d pass along a link to the video which contains the recipe I mentioned earlier. It’s about refinishing a deck, and the recipe is at the end of the video.

http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/video/0,,20282692,00.html

I noticed that you have newer blogs, so I’ll catch up with you there!

-- Dean

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