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M7 and the Cherry Tree #2: Final Day of Cutting with the M7

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Blog entry by Tony posted 2593 days ago 1612 reads 0 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Tree Cutting Part 2 of M7 and the Cherry Tree series Part 3: The concluding Part »

So the penultimate episode in my saga with the M7.

Today I finished cutting all the timber I could with the M7. There were several really big, but short pieces I would have liked to cut up, but they were less than 1 meter long, by 75 cm wide. Very heavy, but too short to manoeuvre onto the M7 alone – The M7 is really designed for pieces longer than 2M in length.
This was a physically tiring exercise, with only one person, yesterday I did have some help and it made the job much easier – the biggest problem was the short length of the logs – has they all been over 2 M long, it would have been much easier. So an early shower, and back to tidy up the property tomorrow.

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This shows the “steps” that were used to raise the logs to the M7 bed

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All packed up and ready to go home (75M) – The trailer is an 8*4 and everything fits inside nicely, just have to watch out for the overhang front and rear (1.3M)

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Here is the final stack of lumber – it is 40% 6/4, 20% 8/4 5% ≥12/4 and 35% outside pieces and garbage. The outside pieces make good weights to hold the lumber down. I just have to cover it now with a plastic sheet.

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This is a sample I cut on my band saw some weeks ago. It was only a ½ “ thick so dried quite quickly. The TUOMI (Finnish name for the tree)/Bird Cherry cuts and sands beautifully, very similar to American black cherry, but the variations in colour are more pronounced in this specimen, than the Black Cherry I have in stock. This piece was sanded to 220 grit. On the Left side it is finished with a natural paste wax and on the right it is finished with Cherry paste wax. The photograph does not do justice to the colours.

As requested, the concluding part, when I have recovered some energy, with be a review of the M7 and its operation.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)



15 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2699 days


#1 posted 2593 days ago

Wow. What a wonderful stack of wood. I’m guessing the mill will get lots of use. It is always somthing I wanted to do, but no where to store and dry the wood here where I live.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2913 days


#2 posted 2593 days ago

Great looking wood and setup. I was wondering if there is a way to mount a boat wench to the back side of your setup(maybe on a hinge that can be pinned in the up position, so it can be quickly lowered to make room for your saw) which would allow you to winch the logs onto the M7? Ramps instead of the stepped setup you have now would probably be the way to go with a winching opertion. I’ve never done it, so this is just a suggestion. You would know best what might and might not work with your setup. I’ve seen other mill operations with the slope type ramps and a winch setup to get the logs on the rack.

I await your final review. Have a nice rest until then, you deserve it.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2632 days


#3 posted 2593 days ago

I do not think it will get that much use Wayne – Not unless I start to sell the lumber – but I do not want to go down that road really. The way I look at it, is that cut 3 trees like this, the M7 is paid for. We do not have such a great variet of large trees here for furniture making.

I coulp probably cut enough timber in One year to last me a life time of furniture making. I could then sell the saw and buy another “toy”

Unless I decide to build another workshop or a house, then this M7 would get some serious work done – take a look at the videos as to what it could do! http://www.logosol.se/_sagverk/m7/index.php?play=1_m7_konstruktion_och_tillbehor – they are in Sedish, but the pictures tell the whole story

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2632 days


#4 posted 2593 days ago

Oscorner – it would not work – The M7 only weighs about 80kg (175lb) and is made from Aluminum – it is not designed for those kind of stresses – I had already considered it. Take a look at the videos, it shows other methods of loading the logs – the step method was the best for the location in this case. – the biggest problem was the short lengths.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2699 days


#5 posted 2593 days ago

I will be interested to see how many trees you actually do. I’m guessing there will be a lot more than 3. Thanks for the video link. It looks like a great tool.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View frank's profile

frank

1492 posts in 2808 days


#6 posted 2593 days ago

Hi Tony;
—-great blog story and some really great cherry wood!

Now I’m waiting to read your write up on the mill and also tell us how the Stihl chainsaw ran, model and hp. I’m interested in the amount of time to push the saw through the cut….oh well, ha!, I guess I can wait….also how did the oiling system work, since the bar chain is going for some length, 27-1/2” ?

Thanks for sharing this write up….
GODSPEED,
Frank

-- --frank, NH, http://rusticwoodart.tumblr.com/

View Karson's profile

Karson

34860 posts in 3003 days


#7 posted 2593 days ago

Great Job Tony. Nice stack of wood. Did the machine seem to mill the boards flat. I noticed that you didn’t cut any at 4 quarter. Were the cutting tolerances not close enough.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2632 days


#8 posted 2593 days ago

Karson

I will make comments on the performance in the next episode!!!!! –

But, please remember that this wood is very wet, it will shrink, so the 6/4, when dry will be about 4/4 and the 8/4 will be about 5/4. I am not too sure about the characteristics of the wood. Time will tell – whatever I get at the end, I will adjust for on the next tree.

I know that the ¼ sawn Birch, Alder and Aspen I cut 2 years ago was wet when cut, it was cut at 33mm and dried to 25mm so I am assuming the same for the Cherry

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2599 days


#9 posted 2593 days ago

good work! do you use a ripping chain?

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2913 days


#10 posted 2593 days ago

I understand, Tony. Thanks.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2639 days


#11 posted 2592 days ago

Tony,

Really a nice setup and good read. Great documentation with photos. I have never seen anything like this in action. Maybe the powers that be will allow us to get into closer proximity so that I can see something like this up close. Frankly, I find myself overwhelmed with the process, just watching your series.

Cheers!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 2599 days


#12 posted 2592 days ago

Mot – you could start with a little Alaskan Small Log Mill like I have…not too overwhelming.

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2763 days


#13 posted 2591 days ago

Great wood and a great story Tony. Maybe you will have some more finds like that and use the M7 some more.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View miles125's profile

miles125

2179 posts in 2608 days


#14 posted 2591 days ago

Dorje, makes me wonder if anyone has done any kind of jig like that for a horizontal bandsaw mounted on rails. hmmm

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2741 days


#15 posted 2587 days ago

Tony -

Well I am drooling at all that wonderful lumber! I really like cherry.

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

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