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Wooden enclosed CNC router project hobby build, fun, fun, fun #1: Building the skeleton.

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Blog entry by Jeff posted 11-11-2014 04:34 PM 2001 reads 2 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Wooden enclosed CNC router project hobby build, fun, fun, fun series Part 2: Working on table and rails »

Going to attempt to build a cnc router just for hobby stuff and maybe help with decking out our barn conversion.

Not really that good at woodworking but I think it will be fun to try and you never know it might come out decent. :-)

Started out scoring some 9 ply 3/4 inch birch plywood from our local home center and cut into pieces to build the bed.

Large Pic

Building the box.

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Using 2×6’s laminated 3 thick for the main supports, staggered the joints and glued and screwed them together

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Putting the base frame together with wheels for now just for convenience.

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Slid the base into place and fastened it.

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This is going to take a while…. wow :-)

Cheers – Jeff

-- To know the road ahead, ask those coming back.



6 comments so far

View Dutchy's profile

Dutchy

2018 posts in 1632 days


#1 posted 11-11-2014 05:56 PM

Thank you for sharing. I hope to folow the rest of the proces. Succes with it.

-- My englisch is bad but how is your dutch?

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

3926 posts in 2707 days


#2 posted 11-11-2014 06:34 PM

It looks like you underestimate your woodworking skills. Here is a little advice you may find helpful. I’m building a CNC router with a 36”x84” work surface. The woodwork is complete, but one must remember, a CNC machine is a precision tool and needs to respond to very precise movements. That means all moving parts need to be “right on”, without any slop or backlash. Achieving precision using wood is very difficult. On my CNC build, I had to incorporate many metal parts I had to machine in order to get acceptable results. Woodworking alone won’t build a working CNC machine. One other thing I have to report is; the electronics and software accounts for 75% of the total cost to build. My CNC is 90% complete, but I am faced with about $1000 to complete plus learning how to operate it. I started out blindly trying to build on the cheap. It’s costing me much more than I bargained for. I don’t want to discourage you, rather I would like to encourage you, as long as you know that this project will cost more than you realize. First off, assuming you have the computer, you will need a CAD program to draw what you wish to make. Second you will need a CAM program to convert the drawing into machine code and finally you will need a program that takes the machine code and translates it into CNC control. I’ve spent over 2 years building my machine and have worked out most of the build issues. I’ve re-invented such things as anti-backlash devices in order to keep the cost as low as possible. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions, problems or concerns.

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

27 posts in 757 days


#3 posted 11-11-2014 07:43 PM



Thank you for sharing. I hope to folow the rest of the proces. Succes with it.

- Dutchy

You are certainly welcome Dutchy! my pleasure. Not real sure how detailed I should be, maybe until someone shows a real interest in my how to failures (lol) I will keep the story board short with some pics. Thanks for stopping by!

Cheers – Jeff

-- To know the road ahead, ask those coming back.

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

27 posts in 757 days


#4 posted 11-11-2014 08:06 PM



It looks like you underestimate your woodworking skills. Here is a little advice you may find helpful. I m building a CNC router with a 36”x84” work surface. The woodwork is complete, but one must remember, a CNC machine is a precision tool and needs to respond to very precise movements. That means all moving parts need to be “right on”, without any slop or backlash. Achieving precision using wood is very difficult. On my CNC build, I had to incorporate many metal parts I had to machine in order to get acceptable results. Woodworking alone won t build a working CNC machine. One other thing I have to report is; the electronics and software accounts for 75% of the total cost to build. My CNC is 90% complete, but I am faced with about $1000 to complete plus learning how to operate it. I started out blindly trying to build on the cheap. It s costing me much more than I bargained for. I don t want to discourage you, rather I would like to encourage you, as long as you know that this project will cost more than you realize. First off, assuming you have the computer, you will need a CAD program to draw what you wish to make. Second you will need a CAM program to convert the drawing into machine code and finally you will need a program that takes the machine code and translates it into CNC control. I ve spent over 2 years building my machine and have worked out most of the build issues. I ve re-invented such things as anti-backlash devices in order to keep the cost as low as possible. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions, problems or concerns.

- MrRon

MrRon, Good advice for sure!! Have the computer, Mach3, high end Cad program but will need a good cam program to write my G code. Did better than a 100 hours of research before I even started but there will always be issues to deal with and you can count on me pickin your brain now and then before this project is over.

Pricing everything out, steppers (Nema 23) and controller package, acme rods, bearings, fittings and brackets, limit switches, hardware, etc etc was about 1,500 so add another 500 and it might do it lol Not a cheap date is it?

Thinking seriously about buying the z axis unit made from aluminum and a complete unit. $150 delivered to my door minus the stepper, nut etc.

Thanks for the advice!! would love to see your machine in operation. :-)

Cheers, – Jeff

-- To know the road ahead, ask those coming back.

View chippewafalls's profile

chippewafalls

44 posts in 779 days


#5 posted 11-12-2014 01:25 AM

ThinkTwice
I admire you for taking on the task of building a CNC from scratch. About 1 1/2 years ago I was looking to do the same but about the time I started looking into the actual build process I came across an older all aluminum machine on Craigs list that need the electronics and programing upgraded. Needless to say I snapped it up and spent the next couple of months working on the upgrade and learning the CAD/Cam programs.

I found CNC Zone web site very helpful.

I agree with MrRon you underestimate your woodworking skills.

Good luck, I will watch out for your updates and progress.

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

27 posts in 757 days


#6 posted 11-12-2014 05:11 AM



ThinkTwice
I admire you for taking on the task of building a CNC from scratch. About 1 1/2 years ago I was looking to do the same but about the time I started looking into the actual build process I came across an older all aluminum machine on Craigs list that need the electronics and programing upgraded. Needless to say I snapped it up and spent the next couple of months working on the upgrade and learning the CAD/Cam programs.

I found CNC Zone web site very helpful.

I agree with MrRon you underestimate your woodworking skills.

Good luck, I will watch out for your updates and progress.

- chippewafalls

Thanks Chippewafalls, you are just about strait west of me about 3 hours. Take it you received a little bit of that white stuff today.

Nice score on your machine, I have been checking CL for quite some time with no luck or they think its made of gold. :(

I am a member of the zone but its seems to be way too big, feel like a speck of dust in the sawdust pile there, ask a simple straightforward question and you get a dozen different answers, by the time you are finished you feel more confused then when you first posted and many look down on you…. like whats this pile of junk you building. I have learned a few things from there tho. Great info in the sticky’s :-)

Cad should be a breeze, I have several that I use weekly. Cam is a different story, have been watching how to vids and doesn’t look to difficult at an entry level, we all get better with practice. Lot of free G code out there.

Thanks for stopping by and the post!!

Cheers – Jeff

-- To know the road ahead, ask those coming back.

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