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I have a dumb question......

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Blog entry by TheWoodenBox posted 1515 days ago 1151 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have been looking at the plans you guys suggested for the thickness sander (by the way, thanks) and I have a “dumb” or “beginners” question. What keeps the wood from shooting out when you run it through? I didn’t finish college but the law of physics tell me if you put a piece of wood into something that is rotating at 1000+ RPMs, it’s going to shoot it across the room.



11 comments so far

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

6813 posts in 1907 days


#1 posted 1515 days ago

the sanding head is spinning in the opposite direction , so the wood going in is pushing against the sander…and between the two mechanics going on…there wont be any spitting of wood….

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4340 posts in 1640 days


#2 posted 1515 days ago

Please read the next comment. I had finger trouble.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View BritBoxmaker's profile

BritBoxmaker

4340 posts in 1640 days


#3 posted 1515 days ago

Always ask ‘dumb’ questions.

1. You learn and
2. You might catch someone, who thinks they’re smarter than you, out.

What happens here is you continuously push the wood against the direction the drum is rotating. Important that, if you get the rotation direction wrong you get a great wood gun.

-- Martyn -- Boxologist, Pattern Juggler and Candyman of the visually challenging. http://www.theartofboxes.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112001 posts in 2181 days


#4 posted 1515 days ago

Over all how happy are you with your sander and what would you change

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View TheWoodenBox's profile

TheWoodenBox

167 posts in 2213 days


#5 posted 1515 days ago

Right now, I don’t have a sander. Just my two hands. I’m a chip carver and I don’t make anything real big. The things a do make, I need to quickly sand the surface.

View DAWG's profile

DAWG

2850 posts in 1741 days


#6 posted 1515 days ago

Magicman I’ve wondered this also, because I always think of my planer that feeds itself. So to add to the question do you push it to a certain point and then pull out from the other side?

-- Luke 23: 42-43

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4760 posts in 2486 days


#7 posted 1515 days ago

I had tried to make one many years ago. I used my wood lathe to turn the sanding drum, and installed a board for a sander bed on a hinge connected to the lathe bed. I reversed the direction on the lathe. It did work, but feeding wood at a consistent rate was tough. The drum is spinning so the work piece is pushing back toward you, so you are correct, you will have to push it through with a push stick, or reach around and continue pulling. Or put it on a sled.

The trick seems to be that you take off a very small amount, so there is not much resistance. But… it can happen. Autumn did have a kick back on hers.

I have since bought a Proformax with auto-feed. It is one of the most used power tools in my shop. I just love it. But it ain’t cheap.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View rance's profile

rance

4125 posts in 1764 days


#8 posted 1515 days ago

Magicman, No ‘dumb’ questions. I wondered the same thing when I started looking.

I am building the SN version(not yet complete) but I’ve also used a Jet drum sander (model 10/20 maybe?). The drum obviously has grit on it, but the platten, that carries the wood under the drum, also has a big sanding belt on it. The biggest difference between the Jet and the one you can build using the SN plans is the price. Seriously, the Jet has a motor to turn the feed belt(on the platten) whereas the SN version has a hand crank. I’m replacing the hand crank to achieve a more uniform rate which hopefully will result in a more uniform result (although I’ve heard that the crank is very sufficient).

As for the rocket affect… Take for example a 10×10 board running through. The drum will contact your board with a surface area at about 10”x1/4”, about 2.5 square inches of friction. The drive belt on the platten, on the other hand, is grasping your board in a 10×10 area, about 100 square inches of friction. The drive belt has more area to grab, and therefore wins the tug of war, thus preventing the drum from shooting your board back at you. It has a 40 times more gripping surface. Even given that you may have a higher grit on the drive belt, it still has a tremendous advantage over the drum.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View 559dustdesigns's profile

559dustdesigns

632 posts in 1771 days


#9 posted 1515 days ago

Rance, what is the SN version, is that short for “Shop Notes”?

-- Aaron - central California "If you haven't got the time to do it right, when will you find the time to do it over?"

View rance's profile

rance

4125 posts in 1764 days


#10 posted 1515 days ago

Yes, ShopNotes (Issue 86).

http://plansnow.com/dn3078.html
Here’s one guy’s:
http://billswood.blogspot.com

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View sras's profile

sras

3784 posts in 1733 days


#11 posted 1515 days ago

Another thing to keep in mind is that the portion of the board that has passed through the sander is thinner. This is the portion that can be grabbed and launched. It still can happen, but it does help…

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

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