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Drill Press Wood Turning

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Blog entry by TheBoxStoreCraftsman posted 09-11-2012 01:37 AM 2462 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Adding a lathe to the arsenal of tools in your shop is usually a milestone for most weekend wood workers as other tools, needs and money tend to push that addition down the list for most of us. So what do you do if you don’t have a lathe but you have the need for some small turnings to help finish off that special heirloom jig you’ve been working on or that special gift for your wife? You could buy them, get a friend to make them or if you have a drill press, you can make them yourself as I did.

While this process wont win any speed records and you can’t turn large projects, it will allow you to turn small knobs, handles or small feet as well as give you a glimpse into the world of turning.

Remember “Necessity is the Mother of Invention”

-- The project is never finished until the workbench is full of tools!"



4 comments so far

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1683 days


#1 posted 09-11-2012 02:17 AM

Just be careful that the chuck doesn’t come off it’s spindle. The Jacobs taper can work loose and have the chuck drop off the spindle. It can’t handle side thrust as well as a Morse taper. A short nail on a board will make a nice little dead center and should make it behave better.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View TheBoxStoreCraftsman's profile

TheBoxStoreCraftsman

37 posts in 826 days


#2 posted 09-11-2012 03:04 AM

Thanks for pointing that out David

-- The project is never finished until the workbench is full of tools!"

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1003 posts in 2171 days


#3 posted 09-13-2012 11:06 PM

Not having a lathe, and no real desire for one, I’ve made some small handle turnings on my old Cman drill press. Was wondering if poplar is your choice of wood for drill press turning? I used yellow pine, sugar pine, and some oak and cherry, but no poplar. Also I dipped a cloth in shellac and applied as the turning rotates. Kinda makes a polished finish I can scuff if too slick. A dip in a bath of finish would work, especially using a narrow vessel. I just liked the way the shellac went on while spinning.

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View TheBoxStoreCraftsman's profile

TheBoxStoreCraftsman

37 posts in 826 days


#4 posted 09-13-2012 11:18 PM

Poplar is not necessarily my choice of wood (I like them all really) but it turns a little easier and is a joy to work with. There is another small knob on the left in the video that i had turned earlier out of of pine. I’m kind of into BLO right now as a finish but I use shellac, lacquer and poly regularly.

Thanks for checking out my video and leaving a comment.

-- The project is never finished until the workbench is full of tools!"

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