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As if I have time for another restore project- Craftsman Shaper

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Blog entry by Tedstor posted 05-18-2011 10:09 AM 1892 reads 1 time favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I bought this shaper several months ago. As far as I can tell, it was manufactured around 1970.
To be honest, I’m not even sure why I even bought it. Totally brainless, impulse buy. I saw it on craigslist in a listing with about 10 other tools. I called the seller to ask about the price. He quoted $80 and included about a dozen cutters. I immediately made arrangements to pick it up. As soon as I hung up the phone, I started asking myself “what the hell do you need with an underpowered, 40 year old shaper?”
Oh well, a deals-a-deal. The next day, i picked up the machine, dumped it in my garage, and didn’t touch it again until yesterday.
As soon as I turned it on, it was obvious that I was going to be spending some quality repair time with my new shaper. While it does work, it makes a faint grinding sound. Its either the spindle bearing or the motor. I’ll need to disconnect the belt and run the motor. hopefully I’ll be able to isolate the noise.
I did run a few 2×4s through the machine. Its obvious the 1/2hp motor isn’t going to cut the mustard. Way to easy to bog down. I’m now in the market for a 1 or 1.5hp motor. That should be powerful enough to do what I need it to do.
After playing around with the machine for a half hour, I definitely think a shaper has the potential to make a permanent spot in my shop. I’m going to make a clone of the Shop Fox Right Angle jig and a couple other accessories that I think will work great with this machine.
A new motor, bearings, belt and paint will cost me. But all said, this will givie me a chance to try out a shaper for a reasonable price. Hopefully I can stumble upon a good used motor on the cheap.



7 comments so far

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2954 posts in 1839 days


#1 posted 05-18-2011 03:41 PM

Looks late a later version of the one I have, if it is, you will have to make an adapter plate to mount a
bigger motor to the mounting plate, otherwise the motor will set at and angle and create problems.
it is a good machine, and Grizzly does stock the 1/2” cutters for it. Hope you enjoy it.

-- As ever, Gus-the 76 yr young apprentice carpenter

View proveritate's profile

proveritate

4 posts in 1308 days


#2 posted 05-29-2011 03:06 PM

I have the same shaper and I noticed that my Grizzly 1/2” cutters are difficult to slip on to the spindle. Bluepine38 or Tedstor, are either of you having the same problem? BTW, I put a 1hp motor on mine and it works fine.

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2954 posts in 1839 days


#3 posted 05-29-2011 03:36 PM

My 1953 Craftsman shaper was made by King-Seeley and had quite a few miles on it when I bought it
for $50. I had to smooth out the acme threads on the shaft to get the retaining nut to operate
smoothly and by the time I polished the shaft, it was small enough that I do not think any cutters
would have any problem fitting.

-- As ever, Gus-the 76 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1446 days


#4 posted 05-29-2011 03:49 PM

very very cool. I like the oil bottle almost as much:)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View proveritate's profile

proveritate

4 posts in 1308 days


#5 posted 05-30-2011 01:16 AM

Bluepine38,

What material and method did you use to polish the threads?

Proveritate

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2954 posts in 1839 days


#6 posted 05-30-2011 06:16 PM

I used my assortment of small to medium files and quite a few feet of 180 grit emery cloth and quite a few
hours while saying politically incorrect things about the person that abused this machine. I had to build up
the bottom of the shaft and make a special driven pulley to get the machine operable. I know it would
have been less expensive and time consuming to buy a new shaper, but I guess I am just too damn
stubborn to quit a project once I start and since I have a lot of time, when the kids, grandkids and great
grandkids are not around, it was fun and I got to play in my shop. If you have the right chuck and a
metal working dead center, do not use a woodworking one, you can put most shafts in a lathe, reduce
the speed and polish them that way. I have a 1950’s era Delta lathe with a compound slide rest that
Delta made for it and can do rough metal turning, nothing within the 1/1000s accuracy range. My
beautiful lady knows that I am just playing in the shop most of the time, but I do little things like putting
a new deck on the front of the house and build her a special built in fireplace with a hearth she can set
on, for cold mornings, and the chimney exhausts out the side of the house instead of out the roof, so
she puts up with me.

-- As ever, Gus-the 76 yr young apprentice carpenter

View thelt's profile

thelt

632 posts in 2133 days


#7 posted 11-16-2012 12:56 PM

Is that a model 119.23930? I was just given one minus the table. I am searching now for an owners manual. The table is rusted but otherwise looks pretty decent. Going to have to do a lot of cleaning on it.

-- When asked what I did to make life worthwhile in my lifetime....I can respond with a great deal of pride and satisfaction, "I served a career in the United States Navy."

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