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Delta 50-760 with Cyclone Retrofit.

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Blog entry by TechRedneck posted 04-29-2012 11:46 PM 8913 reads 24 times favorited 21 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have declared war on dust in the shop. My shop is in the basement/garage and I have been spending more and more time there. Recently I was planing/jointing around 100’ of rough cut cherry for a project which produced a lot of sawdust from all the power tools used.

As a hybrid woodworker, I like to get my wood from the mill and prep it myself, saving money. Once I get the stock flat and square and within 1/8” or less then I switch to hand tools.

I purchased a Delta 50-760 DC unit and Wynn filter over a year ago, along with a trash can separator from Woodcraft it worked fine for the most part. Then I started into a pile of cherry and quickly realized that the can would get about half full and then a lot of the chips were going into the bag, clogging the filter and dropping the suction.

I found that Oneida has a cyclone for the smaller DC units and the Super Dust Deputy received a Best Buy from Fine Woodworking. I ordered one directly from the factory and it arrived in a few days. I wanted to mount the DC unit right on top of the cyclone, and with a lot of measuring and some planning.. here is the result.

If you are still interested, read on and I will explain how I put the system together. It has NOTICEABLY improved air flow to the machines, leaves nearly nothing in the bag and works as advertised. 99% captured!

Materials used were parts of the original Delta unit, about five 2×4’s 8’ long, lleftover leveling feet, some good flat dense insulation in a roll, a 4” by 5” piece of plexiglass, a bunch of 2.5” decking screws, a 6-5” metal reducer crimped on the 6” end, wide metal ducting tape.

Legs of the unit are just screwed together at right angles, I ran them across the jointer to square them up.

Be sure you build the base wide enough to hold your can. Here you can see the completed base with the base of the original Delta upside down. Use the base to mark the holes you will drill in the top of the new base. I used a 1” forstner bit and wend down about 1.5” on all four corners.

I made the lid from 3/4” ply, routed a groove about 3/4” wide to fit to the top of the can and added the gasket material (firm closed cell about 1/4” thick and 3/4” to 1” wide. Put the lid on the can and the SDD on top where you want to position it. Trace around the bottom of the cyclone and mark the mounting holes.

Find some thick wood to use as a “clamp” for the cyclone. On the bandsaw, cut the boards and taper them to fit the cyclone in this position. The cyclone top with the reducer should fit into the intake of the Delta. It is a little loose and that is good, you can seal it up with metal tape later. Pre-drill and screw the two boards into the frame to hold the cyclone.

Here is the top prior to cutting the hole and drilling for the bolts. I used a compass to measure from the edge to the opening at the bottom of the cyclone. Add another 1/8” or so because you want material to fall freely inside and not hit any part of the lid. Sand the inside smooth to avoid any dust buildup. Drill the holes for the bolts with a small bit on center. Flip the lid over and use a forstner bit to countersink for the bolts provided with the cyclone. Then drill the holes to size from the top. The bolts are short unless you purchase new longer ones. I cut another square hole in the lid and put a viewing window in so I can see the level of chips in the bin.

Attach the lid to the bottom of the cyclone, Here I tipped it over to add some leveling feet.

Here is the finished unit. It stands 7.5’ tall and actually takes up less floor space than it did with a separate pre separator. They provide a piece of pipe with the cyclone that accepts the Delta “Y” connector. The bottom goes to the table saw and the top runs to the main line of the DC piping. Here is the interesting part… instead of lifting the unit to remove the can, all you need to do is set the can on some boards or on the floor and place some wedges under the can to move it up into the groove made on the lid.

Wedge the can up until it accepts about 1/2 the weight of the entire unit, nice and snug. To dump the can, remove the wedges, drop the can about 3/4” and slide out. I may design something better but this will do for now.

Here is a view of the lid portal. Double sided foam tape and held with screws. I only had tapered screws so I tapered the holes. Keep a cheap flashlight on top of the can to look in and check the level.

This retrofit has drastically increased the flow of the entire system, I cleaned the filter with compressed air but it has already been seasoned. I then went to each of the machines to test. Jointed and planed several boards to final thickness, then went to the table saw, opened the side and shoveled handfuls of dust into the DC port to test. As you can see, the bag has only a small amount of dust (probably because I tapped the sides) and all the chips went into the bin with no loss of suction. Exactly what I was looking for, and costs about half the price of similar cyclone units on the market.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle



21 comments so far

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

452 posts in 1061 days


#1 posted 04-30-2012 12:42 AM

Excellent …, simply Excellent. Having seen this, I’m going to have to do something very similar.

From the photos, are you using the weight of the SDD to seal the gasket against the can; and, when the can is full, how do you lift the SDD to provide the can’s mobility for emptying? I struggled with this the other night, and is something I haven’t solved? Finally, did you remove the lower ‘pan’ portion of the DC mobility frame?

Again, well-designed; professionally executed.
MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

742 posts in 1547 days


#2 posted 04-30-2012 12:53 AM

MJCD

You don’t lift the unit at all. Just pull the wedges below the can out which drops the can below the lid that is fixed. Slide out the can and empty. Position the empty can under the lid, tap in the wedges to raise or wedge the can against the seal, bering most of the weight of the unit. Feel around the seal to make sure it is in the seal’s groove. Done.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

742 posts in 1547 days


#3 posted 04-30-2012 01:15 AM

The bottom of the original Delta DC was replaced by the new wood base. I will probably turn it into a little cart or something.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View bluekingfisher's profile

bluekingfisher

1058 posts in 1669 days


#4 posted 04-30-2012 07:06 AM

Great work and ingenuity, I have to start or complete my DC system so I’m going to keep my eye on your post.

Thanks for sharing

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Don W's profile

Don W

15245 posts in 1257 days


#5 posted 04-30-2012 11:30 AM

nicely done. Winning the war on dust is always a bit of a challenge.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

452 posts in 1061 days


#6 posted 04-30-2012 02:18 PM

Thanks for the response …

I checked-out my 50-760, and there appears to be a connection on the riser poles, for lack of a better term. The wedge system is an excellent device – one that I’ll have to incorporate. Also, my current arrangement has a snap-seal (can lid to can top), not the gravity (mass) approach you’ve taken. I have to believe you’re approach seals just fine.

I’m completing a Maple cabinet, and will schedule this upgrade for my next trick.
Thanks, again.
MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

742 posts in 1547 days


#7 posted 04-30-2012 07:02 PM

MJCD

You are correct, the frame of the original Delta just lifts out. To do this you keep the whole upper portion of the DC unit intact. (you may have to turn it back around to where the inlet is at the bottom) Essentially, you are building a new base to replace the wheels of the original.

I would guess if you had the room you could put casters on the whole thing and would have to build a bottom shelf to set the can on, however that would add to the height. This is not intended to be a mobile solution, at least in my case.

I would invest in a metal trash can. Mine is the 30 gallon one and the sides can withstand the weight of some of the cyclone but more important it won’t tend to collapse if all your blast gates are closed and you fire up the unit.

I have another cyclone ( ClearVue mini) that is attached to a large shop Vac. If all the gates are closed and I turn it on it literally sucks in the sides of the metal can. You have to watch it but that way I know that all the seals are good. There is so much vacuum on that system that I often have to open another gate to relieve some of the pressure when using tools with smaller ports than 2”.

Since this pic, I added a new lid for the can and new seal similar to the larger cyclone. This little guy handles the router table, and sanding machines due to it’s high velocity air flow and it was built for the smaller dust ports. A system like the one above could handle a 6’ jointer, however it may have trouble with a 12” planer. If a machine has 4” ports then go with a 4” DC system or better.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

452 posts in 1061 days


#8 posted 05-01-2012 11:21 AM

Good Advice. Your shop vac solution is far superior to mine.

I have the smaller Dust Deputy (DD) handling the shop vac. Initially, I had a (30gal) Brute plastic can for the chips, however, the DD collapsed the can on-startup. Currently, I’m using the 5gal ‘paint can’ purchased from Oneida. This DD handles my sanding, hand-held routing, Domino, and general shop clean-up, and does this very well (it feeds a Fein HEPA Filter vac).

I’m wondering whether there is a middle-ground between shop vacs and main DCs. My shop vac costs as much, if not more, than the 50-760. Have you thought about eliminating the shop vac altogether, and tying everything into your main DC? I’ve experimented with this, briefly, and did not get equivalent CFM through the shop vac hose (the hose being connected to a 4”->2”->shop vac hose reducer arrangement – a bit Rube Golberg)? I’d appreciate your thoughts on this.
Thanks, Again.
MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

742 posts in 1547 days


#9 posted 05-01-2012 10:33 PM

The shop vac system was the first DC solution I put in the shop. Since then I’ve re arranged and purchased some new tools. There is probably $250 in parts for the whole thing.

I used it for my old used contractor saw, bandsaw and bench sander. When I added new equipment, a primary consideration was dust ports. Then I purchased the Delta DC and used the bag. After more research on dust I added the Wynn filter and hard piped the DC with blast gates.

So.. My original mini cyclone was dedicated to machines with the smaller ports. The high velocity flow is all they need. I purchased a clear 2.5” kit with blast gates and hard piped all the smaller tools on this system. For the cost, a dual system (4” and2”) works well and is cost effective. This saves me from running 4” pipe all over the place. The only 4” to 2” reduction I use is for the drill press fence.

I have tweaked both systems over the past two years and am now happy with the locations and setup. (that is till I get another tool ). I built a box behind the 12” SCMS and have a 4” port there due to the fact that it moves a higher volume of air. This works better than using the small port it comes with. Very little escapes my miter saw now.

The last thing I plan is a collection hose above the blade on the table saw. The drop from the DC is already in place.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

742 posts in 1547 days


#10 posted 05-02-2012 12:12 AM

While we are on the subject of dust, one of the BEST products for the router table bar none is the Keen Dust Router

Fellow LJ review here http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/2703

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

452 posts in 1061 days


#11 posted 05-02-2012 12:43 AM

Thanks … I’ll take a detailed looked.
MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

4768 posts in 982 days


#12 posted 05-06-2012 01:58 PM

Thanks for your thoughtful, detailed and (for me) timely blog. This is something I’ve been looking into and considering doing. You’ve given me some great ideas toward solving my situation.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1665 posts in 1117 days


#13 posted 07-22-2012 09:22 PM

Mike your modifications are my dream dust colection solution for the Delta 50-760, Very well thought out and excellent work in getting it all together.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View MJCD's profile

MJCD

452 posts in 1061 days


#14 posted 07-23-2012 03:11 AM

Mike:

I’ve been meaning to send this to you – thanks for the inspiration … I’ve shared this with many, and have always mentioned you as the designer.
MJCD

-- Lead By Example; Make a Difference

View TechRedneck's profile

TechRedneck

742 posts in 1547 days


#15 posted 07-23-2012 06:25 PM

MJCD

NICE!... Now you need a wireless remote to turn it on and off. Believe me when I say they are worth the cost because you won’t be tempted to run a machine for a quick cut without the DC. We all get lazy sometimes and will get setup for a cut then forget to walk over and start the DC.

I always throw on my shop apron because my tape measure, center rule, markers and remote are always there. I keep the remote in the center top pocket so I push the button when ready, make the cut and shut it down.

Open blast gates are another issue I am working on. I’m trying to develop a system where the SCMS gate is always open since it is the most used tool in the shop. If I want to use the table saw, I close the default and open the gate for the TS. There is also a gate for the home made blade guard dust collector. Very little dust escapes the TS now.

Since the original post I have run a couple hundred BF through the machines, emptied the trash can at least three times and still have a few teaspoons of dust in the plastic bag. Suction is still strong.

I do plan to blow down the filter with compressed air in the next month or so just to keep it running in top shape. It will be interesting to see how much dust drops down from the filter then.

-- Mike.... West Virginia. "Man is a tool using animal. Without tools he is nothing, with tools he is all.". T Carlyle

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